OpenNebula Newsletter – January 2016

Check this Newsletter to find out the what kept us busy this month: latest developments, events and future plans for the upcoming months.

We are starting this 2016 willing to share with the OpenNebula community another chapter of excellent cloud management. If you, as we do, like planning ahead check the sponsorship opportunities for the next OpenNebula Conf 2016, due in October in Barcelona. Take a look also to the projected OpenNebula TechDays for this year.

Technology

The OpenNebula team, after the release of a new maintenance release for Great A’Tuin, the 4.14.2, is working around the clock on the next upgrade of OpenNebula, v5.0.
This new version will come packed with features and interface changes to iron out the wrinkles in the user experience, to make the experience managing and using an OpenNebula cloud even smoother. vCenter storage management (you are right, including datastore selection and disk hotplug), fully integrated virtual router management (including default and transparent HA for routers), marketplace datastore to easily import/export images to other OpenNebula clouds (we think this is a badass feature), Cloud View improvements, and a long list of other features. As a teaser see this blog entry about resource tagging in Sunstone to keep VMs, networks, images and templates perfectly organized.

Results from the last survey, aimed to understand the use of OpenNebula by the community, has been analyzed and published in the blog. After a careful filter, 190 organizations were chosen as a representative sample of the community. The main changes with respect to the last, 2014 survey are (read a more extensive report here):

  • OpenNebula shows its increasing maturity, with 73% of deployments in production compared to 62% reported in our previous survey.
  • Growth in North America has accelerated, now representing 30% of responses, up from 20%.
  • KVM provides the majority of OpenNebula support, growing from 48% to 79%.
  • There is a high rate of adoption in VMware environments from 28% to 37%.
  • Ubuntu grows from 36% to 40% and Debian falls from 33% to 22% as OS to build the cloud.
  • The use of the EC2 cloud API decreases from 25% to 10%.
  • The use of Ceph has grown considerably from 17% to 40%

Community

The OpenNebula community never sleeps! Well, that may be an overstatement, but certainly when they don’t they contribute to the common knowledge as well as come up with cool integrations to enhance the already mighty power of OpenNebula clouds. Floating IPs for OpenNebula can be easily achieved now thanks to this nifty tool developed OpenNebula clouds, developed by the same authors as CloudVAMP and Docker drivers.

Billing is crucial for VPS providers, which will greatly benefit from this provisioning module for Blesta which can be plugged into OpenNebula infrastructures.
It is crucial for an open source project such as your favourite cloud management platform to receive its users feedback. As you may heard from us before (once or twice), our roadmap is defined using our knowledge of our user and community developer needs. This is why it is so important messages like this one, with very useful feedback to be taken into account in future OpenNebula releases. Thanks, keep up the good work!

Outreach

Recently after our last OpenNebula Conference (talks, slides,pictures), the next, 2016 edition have been announced!. We know it is hard to plan that much in advance, but if you are willing to attend and can save now the date you can take advantage of a huge 40% discount in your Conf tickets. More information is available from the event site.

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Remember our December newsletter? We said you should stay tuned for the OpenNebula TechDay schedule in 2016. If you did then you already know about the quite a few already scheduled TechDays around the world for this year, to which we promptly added others in US. The OpenNebula Cloud TechDays are full day events to learn about OpenNebula with a hands-on cloud installation and operation workshop, and presentations from community members and users. TechDays hosts have an important role, and that is the local promotion of the event to gather OpenNebula enthusiasts in this technical event. If you are interested in participating in (or hosting) any of these TechDays agenda let us know.

TechDays

OpenNebula was spoken of in the Journée interministérielle du libre 2016 in France, country which recommends OpenNebula in their open source software reference list. Rubén S. Montero, our chief architect, gave an interesting interview to DatacenterDynamics magazine, check it out.
OpenNebula Systems also announced this month its training plans for 2016 for Europe and US. These courses are designed to train cloud administrators to properly operate an OpenNebula infrastructure. Please contact us if your would like to request training near you.
Members of the OpenNebula team will be present in the following events in upcoming months:

  • VMworld 2016 US, August 28 – September 1, Las Vegas (Mandalay Bay Hotel & Convention Center), Nevada, US.
  • VMworld 2016 Europe, October 17 – 20, Barcelona (Fira Barcelona Gran Via), Spain.

Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Events page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

Upcoming Cloud TechDays Cambridge USA and Toronto CA

Last week we opened the call for speakers and registration to the OpenNebula Cloud TechDays in Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia), Sofia (Bulgaria), Dallas (TX, USA), Ede (The Netherlands) and Nuremberg (Germany). Today we are announcing that we just opened the call for speakers and registration to the following Cloud TechDays:

Send us an email at events@opennebula.org if you are interested in speaking at one of the TechDays and register as soon as possible if you are interested in participating, seats are limited!.

For more information on past events, please visit the Cloud Technology Days page

Please send us an email at events@opennebula.org if you are interested in hosting a TechDays event.

We look forward to your answers!

Upcoming Cloud TechDays in 2016

Besides our annual OpenNebula Conference in Barcelona (very early bird registration is now open), we are planning to organize Technology Day events in multiple cities globally during 2016. We have just published complete info about the following TechDays:

And in a few days we will publish the details of the TechDays we are organizing in:

  • Dublin, Ireland
  • Toronto, Canada
  • Cambridge, MA, USA
  • Madrid, Spain
  • San Francisco, CA, USA

TechDays

 

The OpenNebula TechDays are full day events to learn about OpenNebula with a hands-on cloud installation and operation workshop, and presentations from community members and users that will focus on:

  • Sharing cloud use cases and deployment experiences
  • Introducing new integrations and ecosystem developments
  • Describing other related cloud open-source projects and tools

Send us an email at events@opennebula.org if you are interested in speaking at one of the TechDays and register as soon as possible if you are interested in participating, seats are limited!.

For more information on past events, please visit the Cloud Technology Days page

Please send us an email at events@opennebula.org if you are interested in hosting a TechDays event.

We look forward to your answers!

OpenNebula Public Training for 2016

OpenNebula Systems has published the schedule for public classes in 2016 at its offices in Madrid, Spain, and Cambridge, MA, USA. This year OpenNebula Systems is expanding its public training services to the United States.

The course about OpenNebula Fundamentals: Cloud Operator and Architect uses a hands-on lab atmosphere to provide IT professionals with the skill-sets they need to install, configure and operate OpenNebula deployments. Additionally the program briefly addresses the integration of OpenNebula with other components in the data center.

You can contact OpenNebula Systems if your would like to request public training near you or private on-site training.

2015 OpenNebula Cloud Architecture Survey Results

Executive Summary

This is the third survey of OpenNebula deployments since September 2012. The results of this voluntary survey were answered online between December 3, 2015 and December 11, 2015. While previous surveys were open for several months, responses in this survey were collected only over a period of one week because its goal is to have a snapshot on the architectural components of existing OpenNebula clouds in order to improve support for the most demanded infrastructure platforms and configurations.

Although several hundreds of organizations took part of the survey, we have only included in the analysis the 190 respondents that are using OpenNebula 4.x (latest series) and who we deem reliable because they have provided identification details that allow us to verify the answers of the survey. This is important given that our main aim is to have accurate and useful information about OpenNebula deployments. This Survey is not a market survey and does not express all OpenNebula deployments worldwide. Since the foundation of the open-source project in November 2007, OpenNebula has been downloaded more than 360,000 times from the project site (280,000 times since our first survey in September 2012 and 160,000 times since our latest survey in August 2014), not including other software repositories or third-party distributions.

Regarding the use of OpenNebula, the Survey shows 43% of overall deployments are in Industry and 13% in Research Centers. Most of organizations (80%) are in Europe, Russia or North America and use OpenNebula to build private clouds (93%). When asked about the type of workload, 73% said that they use OpenNebula for running production workloads.

Regarding the size of the clouds, 80% of deployments have fewer than 100 nodes and 10% of deployments have more 500 physical nodes. 51% of deployments consist of more than one OpenNebula zone and 5% run more than 10 zones. Among the advanced components offered by OpenNebula, High Availability at 73% is the most widely used, in correspondence with the predominant production usage of OpenNebula.

Regarding the building blocks of the cloud, KVM at 79% and VMware vCenter at 37% are the dominant virtualization platforms, and CentOS at 44% and Ubuntu at 40% are the most widely used linux distributions for OpenNebula clouds. The preferred choices for the storage back-ends are shared FS and Ceph at 60% and 40% respectively. Regarding networking, most of the deployments, 45%, use the Standard Linux Bridge for network configuration, 35% use 802.1Q, and 33% use Open vSwitch. 44% of deployments use the hybrid cloud functionality offered by OpenNebula. Amazon EC2 at 30% and Microsoft Azure at 16% are the most widely used public clouds.

In comparison to previous survey findings in 2014, there have been some changes:

  • OpenNebula shows its increasing maturity, with 73% of deployments in production compared to 62% reported in our previous survey.
  • Growth in North America has accelerated, now representing 30% of responses, up from 20%.
  • KVM provides the majority of OpenNebula support, growing from 48% to 79%.
  • There is a high rate of adoption in VMware environments from 28% to 37%.
  • Ubuntu grows from 36% to 40% and Debian falls from 33% to 22% as operating systems to build the cloud.
  • The use of the EC2 cloud API decreases from 25% to 10%.
  • The use of Ceph has grown considerably from 17% to 40%.
  • The use of LVM as storage solution decreases from 22% to 12%.

On the whole, OpenNebula continues to be loved by its users for its flexibility, 82%, simplicity, 80%, and openness, 72%. These results are aligned with our our mission — to become the simplest cloud enabling platform — and our purpose — to bring simplicity to the private and hybrid enterprise cloud. OpenNebula exists to help companies build simple, cost-effective, reliable, open enterprise clouds on existing IT infrastructure.

We would like to thank all respondents that took part in the survey!

A. About the Organization

43% of respondents indicated that they work for industry, while 13% work for research centers. These are similar to previous survey results.

Type_Organization

Type of Organization

 

50% of deployments are in Europe and Russia. This means a small reduction compared with previous survey data where the number of deployments in Europe and Russia was 54%. The number of deployments in North America grows from 20% to 30%. 80% of respondents are located in Europe, Russia, and North America.

Geographic

Geographic Region

 

65% of organizations are small companies with fewer than 500 employees, and only 7% has more than 10,000 employees.

Employees

Number of Employees in the Organization

B. About the Type of Cloud

93% of respondents are running a private cloud for internal operations, while 34% are running a public cloud to offer utility services. Compared with previous survey data in 2014, the number of public clouds decreases from 40% and the number of private deployments increases from 84%.

Type

Type of Cloud (people may select more one checkbox)

 

73% of respondents are running non-critical environments or peripheral installations for running testing or development applications, while 73% are using the cloud for running production workloads. We see that OpenNebula is increasingly mature, with more deployments moving into production stage as compared with prior surveys data, from 42% in 2012 and 62% in 2014.

Workload

Type of Workload (people may select more one checkbox)

 

The number of users in most of the clouds, 70%, is fewer than 100. Many of these deployments use OpenNebula as virtual data center infrastructure manager and not as a cloud provisioning platform. Similar results were collected in previous edition of the survey.

Users

Number of Users

C. About the Cloud Architecture

56% of OpenNebula deployments have more than 10 nodes, and 10% of the deployments have more than 500 physical nodes. Similar results were collected in the previous edition of the survey.

Nodes

Number of Nodes

 

51% of deployments are federated environments consisting of more than one OpenNebula zone, and 5% are running more than 10 zones.This means a slight increase, from 44%, in the number of federated environments compared to previous survey.

Zones

Number of Zones

 

KVM at 79% and vCenter at 37% are the most widely used virtualization platforms. Next one is Xen at 12%. VMware ESX drivers are used by only 4% of deployments, most of VMware users have migrated from ESX to vCenter drivers, which brings many benefits. The number of KVM users has grown considerably from 48% to 79% and the number of VMware users has grown from 28% to 37%, compared to previous survey in 2014 (vCenter support was introduced just after the previous survey). Other hypervisors include those not part of the main OpenNebula distribution that are supported through community plugins.

Hypervisor

Hypervisor (people may select more one checkbox)

 

Shared file system at 60% and Ceph at 40% are the most widely used storage solutions in open environments. The use of Ceph has grown considerably from 17% in 2014. FS LVM, Block LVM and GlusterFS are used by 17%, 12% and 12% of organizations respectively. VMware FS at 40% is used in VMware-based deployments, mainly through vCenter.

Storage

Storage Configuration (people may select more one checkbox)

 

Most of deployments, 45%, use the Standard Linux Bridge for network configuration; 35% use 802.1Q; 33% use Open vSwitch; and 13% use VXLAN. VMware networking at 40% is used in VMware-based deployments, mainly through vCenter. These are similar to previous survey results.

Network

Network Configuration (people may select more one checkbox)

 

Regarding authentication, most of organizations, 73%, use the built-in user/password system, while SSH and LDAP/AD, with 50% and 36% respectively, are the more popular external authentication systems. Similar results to previous edition of the survey.

Authentication

Authentication Configuration (people may select more one checkbox)

 

CentOS at 44% and Ubuntu at 40% are the most widely used linux distributions for building OpenNebula clouds. CentOS slightly falls from 46% and Ubuntu grows from 36%. Debian decreases from 33% to 22% of the deployments.

OS

Operating System (people may select more one checkbox)

 

Among the advanced features offered by OpenNebula, High Availability, with 73%, is the most widely used. DC federation and Flow multi-VM are the next features with 55% and 45% respectively. The use of the EC2 cloud API drops from 25% to 10%.

Advanced

Advanced Components (people may select more one checkbox)

 

In this survey edition we added a new question about the use of hybrid cloud drivers. 44% of deployments use the hybrid cloud functionality offered by OpenNebula. Amazon EC2 at 30% and Microsoft Azure at 16% are the most widely used public clouds.

Hybrid

Hybrid Cloud (people may select more one checkbox)

D. Why OpenNebula

One more year, simplicity, flexibility, and openness continue being the main reasons for choosing OpenNebula.

Why

Why OpenNebula (people may select more than one checkbox)

OpenNebulaConf 2016: Oct 25-27 in Barcelona (again!)

Following last year’s successful event, we are happy to announce that the fourth annual OpenNebula Cloud Conference will take place on October 25-27 at the same venue as the previous year, the Barceló Sants Hotel in Barcelona.

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OpenNebula Conferences are education events that serve as a meeting point of cloud users, developers, administrators, integrators and researchers, featuring talks with experiences and use cases. They also include tutorials, lightning talks, and hacking sessions that provide an opportunity to discuss burning ideas, and meet face to face to discuss development.

The third OpenNebulaConf will open its Call for Sponsors and Call for Speakers in a few days, stay tuned for content updates.

And remember… OpenNebulaConfs are vendor-neutral events focused on real-world practices and how to successfully implement open source in your cloud.

We look forward to seeing you in Barcelona!

OpenNebula 5.0 Features: Labels

We are working hard on new features and improvements for OpenNebula 5.0. In this post we will share with you the new labels support that will be included in Sunstone.

This new feature will enable the possibility to group the different resources under a given label and filter them in the admin and cloud views. With this new functionality, the user will be able to easily find the template she wants to instantiate or select a set of resources to apply a given action.

Labels can be defined for most of the OpenNebula resources from the admin view. Each resource will store the labels information in its own template, thus it can be easily edited from the CLI or Sunstone.

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The list of labels defined for each pool will be shown in the left navigation menu. After clicking on one of these labels only the resources with this label will be shown in the table. This filter is also available in the cloud view inside the virtual machine creation form to easily select a specific template.

Screen Shot 2015-12-22 at 15.50.42

Stay tuned in the next coming weeks for more details about the new features planned for OpenNebula 5.0.

 

 

OpenNebula 2015: Year in Review

This has been a very interesting year in the Cloud Computing field in general, and in OpenNebula in particular. It looks like the field is consolidating, and we are past the Peak of Inflated Expectations slowly moving into the Plateau of Productivity. This can be inferred from the increasing number of enterprises that are implementing their in-house private clouds and offloading their computing needs to public cloud providers, showing that the paradigm did take off and it’s soaring towards computing efficiency.

In this regard, we are proud that OpenNebula celebrated this year its 8th anniversary, showing a degree of maturity fit for the most demanding production environments. The OpenNebula project is proud to deliver a truly open, vendor-free, user-driven software to build private and hybrid clouds, with design principles that focus on simplicity and flexibility. Our philosophy is not to break with the previous outstanding work in datacenters, but rather extending its functionality to take advantage of the cloud computing benefits. We think this is a unique vision in the field, and OpenNebula is the product of this believe.

With 2015 coming quickly to a close, we’d like to review what this year has meant for the OpenNebula project. You have all the details about the great progress that we have seen for the OpenNebula project in our monthly newsletters.

Solving Real User Needs in Innovative Ways

Two major releases were published this year: 4.12 Cotton Candy and 4.14 Great A’Tuin. Moreover, three maintenance versions were released to fix bugs and polish features. Several maintenance versions of AppMarket were also released.

4.12 Cotton Candy shipped with several improvements in different subsystems and components. For the first time, OpenNebula introduced the ability to generate cost reports that can be integrated with chargeback and billing platforms, and also presented to both the administrators and the end users. Each VM Template defined by the Cloud administrator can define a cost per cpu and per memory per hour. Extensively used features like SPICE, Security Groups and VXLAN were firstly seen in Cotton Candy

One of the main focus of 4.14 Great A’Tuin has been the Sunstone interface, which has been completely refactored for maintenance and performance reasons. However Great A’Tuin is probably the release of OpenNebula to date that features more new functionality. GPU support is a great addition to support HPC oriented infrastructures, importing existing running VMs into OpenNebula for all supported hypervisors (including the public ones), fully supported disk snapshots for Ceph and qcow2, image resizing, ability to ability to save VMs into VM Templates for later use, flexible context definition of network attributes, the list goes on and on. We feel this is the most mature and rich OpenNebula version, but we are not stopping here since work towards 5.0 has already started.

Moreover, four major releases of vOneCloud were released this year. Thanks to the amazing user feedback, the a virtual appliance for vSphere that transforms an existing vCenter deployment into an automated, self-service private cloud in a few minutes, is quickly growing its feature set to deliver a reliable, robust and mature product. vOneCloud exposes a multi-tenant, cloud-like provisioning layer, including features like virtual data centers, self-service portal, or hybrid cloud computing to connect in-house vCenter infrastructures with public clouds. vOneCloud seamlessly integrates with running vCenter virtualized infrastructures, and can be set up if a few minutes and import the existing infrastructure resources, including running VMs.

We would like to thank the community members that have contributed with patches, documentation and feedback to the matureness of OpenNebula. Also, to the various organizations that have contributed to enhance OpenNebula through the Fund a Feature program: Blackberry, Echelon, Unity, BIT.nl, SURFsara and the Université Catholique de Louvain. We look forward to your contributions to code development!.

An Engaged Community of Users

The OpenNebula community is as healthy as ever, and fastly growing. The contributions to the software and its roadmap are vast, and cannot be briefly mentioned. We wanted to highlight a few integrations and feature extensions though, like one onesnooper, StorPool, Vagrant, LXC, nodejs binding, Saturnring, Kerberos, Chef, CloudVAMP, Docker, ZFS, and many many more. We are proud of our very much alive, proactive and engage community!

There are tens of thousands of deployments around the globe and OpenNebula is parked in some of the biggest organizations out there including Industry and Research leaders. OpenNebula roadmap is defined by its users needs. We just performed a survey to require input for the list of features that will be tackled for the next major update, OpenNebula 5.0.

2015 also marked the end of the distribution mailing list as the main mechanism of communication with our community, in favour of the new online forum, to keep this communication agile and fruitful.

We would like to thank all our users! It is out of scope to name all new users, but we want to give a wholeheartedly warm welcome to those new users that shared their experiences through our blog: Unity, Universidad Politécnica de Valencia, PTisp, Avalon, China Mobile, Rentalia and BIT.nl. If you are using OpenNebula, you are very welcome to contribute your integrations and experiences by writing a post in our blog or submitting your integration to the OpenNebula Add-on Catalog.

Spreading the Word

Spreading the OpenNebula word is of the uttermost importance for the project. The brightest highlight is, as usual, the OpenNebulaConf 2015. This year it was held in slick hotel Barcelo Sants in Barcelona and featured very interesting talks by relevant users: Runtastic, Unity, Citrix, RedHat, Fermilab, … Check out the videos, slides and pictures to get a glimpse of what you missed. A lot of new ideas for features and collaborations were fostered in this event, so expect a great and fruitful 2016.

In 2015 members of the OpenNebula team participated in several around the world. We want to highlight the VMworld Europe 2015 in Barcelona, Cloud Expo Europe in London and the Open Cloud Day in Bern. These events are great opportunities to evangelize people into what we think is the greatest Cloud Management Platform.

A number of high quality OpenNebula TechDays, full day events to learn about OpenNebula with a hands-on cloud installation and operation workshop and presentations from community, were held this year. Check out the agendas of the Prague, Boston, Paris and Ontario TechDays.

We want to thank all organizations that hosted a TechDay in 2015 for their hospitality. We are organizing the schedule of TechDays for future months, send us an email or send it to the community discuss mailing list if you are interested in hosting a TechDay event. We also look forward to proposals to create a user group in your area. In a few days we will announce OpenNebulaConf 2016.

***

We are thrilled to have a community as vibrant and engaged as the OpenNebula one. Two thumbs up to you all for helping us building a great cloud management platform that solves real world problems.

We’d also like to take this opportunity to wish you happiness and prosperity in 2016 to you and your loved ones!

– The OpenNebula Team

Creating Customized Images

One of the steps when preparing an OpenNebula installation is the creation of Virtual Machine images for base Operating Systems or appliances. Some of these images can be downloaded from the marketplace but you may need an OS that is not in the marketplace or the images must be customized in some other way.

I’m going to describe an automated way to customize the base images provided by the Linux distributions using the software libguestfs.

The software libguestfs comes with tools to create and modify Virtual Machine images in a number of formats that qemu understands. Some of these utilities let us add or delete files inside the images or execute scripts using the image filesystem as root.

The first step is getting an image from the distribution web page. I usually get these images as they are very small and don’t have extra software. For this example we will use CentOS 7. Head to http://cloud.centos.org/centos/7/images/ and download the image CentOS-7-x86_64-GenericCloud.qcow2c.

One of the customizations we have to do to this image is uninstall the cloud-init package that comes by default with that image and install OpenNebula context package. The easiest way to install extra packages that are not in a repository is to add them into a CDROM that will provided to the customization tool. So head to https://github.com/OpenNebula/addon-context-linux/releases and download the latest context package.

To create the CDROM image we can use genisoimage. Remember to add a label so it’s easier to mount. Here we are going to use the label PACKAGES:

  • Copy the packages to a directory, for example packages
  • Execute genisoimage to create the iso that contains those files:
$ genisoimage -o packages.iso -R -J -V PACKAGES packages/

Now we need to prepare a script with the customizations to be done in the image. For example:

mount LABEL=PACKAGES /mnt

# Install opennebula context package
rpm -Uvh /mnt/one-context*rpm

# Remove cloud-init and NetworkManager
yum remove -y NetworkManager cloud-init

# Install growpart and upgrade util-linux, used for filesystem resizing
yum install -y epel-release --nogpgcheck
yum install -y cloud-utils-growpart --nogpgcheck
yum upgrade -y util-linux --nogpgcheck

# Install ruby for onegate tool
yum install -y ruby

Instead of modifying the original image downloaded we can use a feature of qcow2 image that is creating a new image that is based on another one. This way we keep the original image in case we are not happy with the modifications or we want to create another image with different customizations.

$ qemu-img create -f qcow2 -b CentOS-7-x86_64-GenericCloud.qcow2c centos.qcow2

Now all is prepared to customize the image. The command we are going to use is virt-customize. It can do a lot of modifications to the image but we are only going to do two. Execute the previous script and disable root password, just in case. The command is this one:

$ virt-customize -v --attach packages.iso --format qcow2 ---attach centos.qcow2 ---run script.sh -root-password disabled

It attaches two images, the iso image with the packages and the OS hard disk, executes script.sh that we previously created and disables root password.

After the command is run the image centos.qcow2 contains the modifications we did to the original image. Now we can convert it to any other format we need (for example vmdk) or to a full qcow2 image, that it, does not depend on any other one. Here are the commands to convert it to qcow2 (compatible with old qemu versions) and vmdk:

$ qemu-img convert -f qcow2 -O qcow2 -o compat=0.10 centos.qcow2 centos-final.qcow2
$ qemu-img convert -f qcow2 -O vmdk centos.qcow2 centos-final.vmdk

There are other customizations you can do, for example set a fixed password with --root-password password:r00tp4ssw0rd. You can also use virt-sparsify to discard the blocks that are not used by the filesystem. Check the libguestfs web page to learn about all the possibilities.

You can also take a look at the presentation I gave about this topic in the CentOS dojo held in Barcelona this year:

https://speakerdeck.com/jfontan/customizing-virtual-machine-images

OpenNebula TechDays 2016 – Call for Hosts

Besides our annual OpenNebula Conference, we are planning to organize Technology Day events in multiple cities globally during 2016.

The OpenNebula TechDays are full day events to learn about OpenNebula with a hands-on cloud installation and operation workshop, and presentations from community members and users that will focus on:

  • Sharing cloud use cases and deployment experiences
  • Introducing new integrations and ecosystem developments
  • Describing other related cloud open-source projects and tools

In the shorter term we would like to organize TechDays in USA (East and West coasts) and Europe, like we did during 2015:

For more information on past events, please visit the Cloud Technology Days page. These are not for profit events, all funds raised are rolled into the OpenNebula promo fund and will be used for further OpenNebula TechDay Events.

We look forward to your answers