OpenNebula 4.6 RC Released!

The OpenNebula project is proud to announce the availability of OpenNebula 4.6 RC (Carina). This release brings many new features and stabilizes features that were introduced in previous versions.

OpenNebula 4.6 introduces important improvements in several areas. The provisioning model has been greatly simplify by supplementing user groups with resource providers. This extended model, the Virtual Data Center, offers an integrated and comprehensive framework for resource allocation and isolation.

Another important new feature has taken place in the OpenNebula core. It has undergone a minor re-design of its internal data model to allow federation of OpenNebula daemons. With OpenNebula Carina your users can access resource providers from multiple data-centers in a federated way.

provisioning-full

With Carina the OpenNebula team has started a journey to deliver a more intuitive and simpler provisioning experience for users. Our goal is level the final user usability with the system administration and operation ones. First, the Sunstone graphical interface has been tweaked to help the user workflows. It has also been improved in order to support the new Marketplace version, which makes even easier for a user to get a virtual application up and running.

Finally, some other areas has received the attention of the OpenNebula developers, like for example a better Gluster support through libgfapi, improved access to large pools pagination, or optionally limit the resources exposed by a host, among many others are included in Carina.

As usual OpenNebula releases are named after a Nebula. The Carina Nebula (NGC 3372) is one of the largest nebulae the sky. It can only be seen from the southern hemisphere, in the Carina constellation.

Thanks the community members and users who have contributed to this software release by being active with the discussions, answering user questions, or providing patches for bugfixes, features and documentation.

The new features for VDCs, Federations and OVA support in the Marketplace introduced in OpenNebula 4.6 were funded by Produban in the context of the Fund a Feature Program.

Relevant Links

oneInsight: A 2D-Load Visualization Addon for OpenNebula-Managed Hosts

I’m pleased to announce oneInsight, a visualization addon for OpenNebula that allows users to have at-a-glance, an insight of the load of managed hosts. It provides various kinds of load mappings, that currently include the following metrics:

  • CPU used by OpenNebula-managed virtual machines;
  • Memory used by managed virtual machines;
  • Effective CPU used by all system processes, including processes outside of managed virtual machines;
  • Effective memory used by all system processes.

Here is a screenshot showing an overview of CPU used.

Screenshot of oneInsight

Benefits

oneInsight enables many benefits, as well for cloud operators than for business managers:

  • Provides a simple and comprehensible load charting that allows you to have at-a-glance an accurate insight on how servers are loaded, so to let you plan migrations and capacity upgrading if necessary;
  • Provides, via tooltip and popup, details about each server in zero or one click;
  • High class visualization that saves you from command line output;
  • Lightweight HTML/Javascript stack that can be deployed on any server within your IT infrastructure, just need a valid OpenNebula user account and a network access to OpenNebula server.

How oneInsight Works

oneInsight works out-of-the-box on the vast majority of Linux operating systems, subject to have the following tools installed:

  • curl command line interface
  • The Bash interpreter
  • The cron time-based job scheduler
  • A Web server like Apache and nginx, even the python SimpleHTTPServer module just works fine

Read the documentation to get started.

What Next & Contributions

oneInsight is a new project, and there is a lot of things concerning data visualization in OpenNebula. Contributors are welcome, we apply the Github Pull Request model for contributions in code and documentation. Stay tuned.

OpenNebula Newsletter – March 2014

We want to let you know about what we are up to with the main news from the last month regarding the OpenNebula project, including what you can expect in the following months.

Technology

With OpenNebula 4.6 Beta released, the team is working full throttle ironing out wrinkles: fixing bugs, polishing the interface, prepping the documentation, updating related components and applications, etc. It is a lot of work, but we want our users to experience a migration as smooth as possible.

One of the main contributions of this new release is a big boost to the provisioning model. Besides the Sunstone interface facelift, including tweaks to help the user workflow, there has been a number of provisioning ideas developed in this release. For instance, Sunstone integration with marketplace has also been improved in order to support the new AppMarket version, which makes even easier for a user to get a virtual application up and running. Moreover, the provisioning model has been greatly simplify by supplementing user groups with resource providers. This extended model, the Virtual Data Center, offers an integrated and comprehensive framework for resource allocation and isolation.

The latest addition to the provisioning model improvement is the new provisioning view for cloud end users. This view ensures a minimal and utterly simple portal to consume cloud resources. All the clutter is out of the way to make the experience as pleasant as possible. Give it a spin!

BjrE8KmIcAE93TN

The other significant features that will be present in OpenNebula 4.6 includes the ability to achieve a federation using OpenNebulas (yes, plural is coming!) at different datacenters. Check out the screencast on partitioning clouds with vDCs to get a feel on this new functionality. Also, 4.6 will feature the ability to import OVAs into OpenNebula via AppMarket, and will be a complete translation and import of all the resources defined in the OVA: disks, capacity, network, etc. Other aspects that are being revisited are storage backends, virtual networking, datastore, image and VM management and Sunstone. You can find a comprehensive list here.

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Some of the above features have been sponsored by Produban in the context of the Fund a Feature program.
Another technology contribution by OpenNebula members is summarise in this post about integrating puppet and OpenNebula: Automatic configuration of VMs with Puppet. Moreover, integration with GlusterFS (a distributed filesystem with replica and storage distribution features that come really handy for virtualization), was also addressed in the Native GlusterFS Image Access for KVM Drivers post.

Community

This month the community was as engaged as ever. We would like to give a big “thank you” to all the OpenNebula users that gave as feedback about the beta version of OpenNebula 4.6. The final release will be more robust due to you!

Our friends at BIT (this month they hosted the very first OpenNebula TechDay, check the Outreach section of this newsletter ;) ) wrote a very long and flattering (cheers!) post stating their experiences with OpenNebula. We would like to highlight in this newsletter the following excerpt:

The OpenNebula way of developing software is open, and user focused, The “voice” of the community really matters. The cliche “software made with and for the community” really applies here. If users get (positive) feedback about their input they feel appreciated and be more “connected” to the project. The “atmosphere” on the mailing list is friendly and open. No flame wars, or negativism here, so it keeps users “in” instead of pushing them away.

So we blush! We are glad that our users feel this atmosphere, which is the main driver of the OpenNebula project ;)

Folks at CloudWeavers build this slick portable DC based on OpenNebula. Awesomely pretty!

Outreach

As usual, first things first, this year’s OpenNebula Conference will be held in Berlin as well, 2-4 of December, 2014. If you want to repeat or find out how it is for yourself, save the date!

Following last month series of comparing OpenNebula with other similar projects, we published a new post comparing the balance between user base and community in both the OpenStack and OpenNebula projects. Check it out, it is an interesting read.

We are setting up a number of OpenNebula TechDays around the world. These events are designed to learn about OpenNebula with a hands-on cloud installation and operation workshop, and presentations from community members and users. If you are interested in hosting or sponsoring one, let us know!. The first TechDay happened in Ede, Netherlands, and was hosted by BIT, a dutch internet service provider. You can read about the aftermath here.

tutorial-ede

There will be two OpenNebula TechDays in the upcoming months in the USA, covering both the east and the west coast. The one in Florida will take place in Boca Raton the 19th of June, hosted by TransUnion, whereas the west coast will be covered by the Bay Area Techday the 24th of June, hosted by Hyve, which includes an exciting tour around the manufacturing plant of Facebook production racks.

This month, the OpenNebula team participated in the Cloud Expo Europe 2014. As part of the Open Cloud Forum sessions about open source cloud solutions, there was an OpenNebula tutorial. Also, OpenNebula was present at the biggest IT fair in the world, the CeBIT 2014, were we hanged out the Netways booth. Our partners, Netways, represented OpenNebula in the FLOSS UK 2014.

And, last but not least, our project director travelled to Greece for the Future Internet Assembly 2014, with a presentation aiming to show how OpenNebula is driving innovation in cloud computing, impacting the adoption of private cloud, and enabling business in the cloud.

The following events are happening this month, with the participation of an OpenNebula team member:

During the following months, members of the OpenNebula team will be speaking in the following events:

Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Events page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

There are still available seats for the LOADays in Belgium, register now!.

OpenNebula 4.6 Beta Released!

The OpenNebula project is proud to announce the availability of OpenNebula 4.6 Beta (Carina). This release brings many new features and stabilizes features that were introduced in previous versions.

OpenNebula 4.6 introduces important improvements in several areas. The provisioning model has been greatly simplify by supplementing user groups with resource providers. This extended model, the Virtual Data Center, offers an integrated and comprehensive framework for resource allocation and isolation.

Another important new feature has taken place in the OpenNebula core. It has undergone a minor re-design of its internal data model to allow federation of OpenNebula daemons. With OpenNebula Carina your users can access resource providers from multiple data-centers in a federated way.

With Carina the OpenNebula team has started a journey to deliver a more intuitive and simpler provisioning experience for users. Our goal is level the final user usability with the system administration and operation ones. First, the Sunstone graphical interface has been tweaked to help the user workflows. It has also been improved in order to support the new Marketplace version, which makes even easier for a user to get a virtual application up and running.

Finally, some other areas has received the attention of the OpenNebula developers, like for example a better `Gluster <gluster_ds>` support through libgfapi, improved access to large pools pagination, or optionally limit the resources exposed by a host, among many others are included in Carina.

As usual OpenNebula releases are named after a Nebula. The Carina Nebula (NGC 3372) is one of the largest nebulae the sky. It can only be seen from the southern hemisphere, in the Carina constellation.

Thanks the community members and users who have contributed to this software release by being active with the discussions, answering user questions, or providing patches for bugfixes, features and documentation.

The new features for VDCs, Federations and OVA support in the Marketplace introduced in OpenNebula 4.6 were funded by Produban in the context of the Fund a Feature Program.

Relevant Links

Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 18.26.14

OpenNebula TechDay Ede – Agenda and Speaker Line-up

The OpenNebula Project is proud to announce the final agenda and line-up of speakers for our first OpenNebula TechDay. The TechDay will be hosted by BIT.nl, internet service provider and datacenter in The Netherlands, on the 26th of March. The agenda includes a hands-on cloud installation and operation workshop, presentations from OpenNebula community members and users, and an open space to discuss passionate questions, burning ideas, features, integrations…

9:00-13:00: Hands-on Workshop
Jaime Melis, Engineer at OpenNebula and C12G Labs

13:00-14:00: Lunch

14:00 – 14:30: Introduction to the TechDays
Rubén S. Montero, Chief Architect at OpenNebula and C12G Labs

14:30 – 15:00: New Features in OpenNebula
Jaime Melis, Engineer at OpenNebula and C12G Labs

15:00 – 15:30: OpenNebula Experiences @ BIT.nl
Stefan Kooman, BIT.nl

15:30 – 15:45: Coffee Break

15:45 – 16:15: OpenNebula Experiences @ SURFsara
Ander Astudillo, Consultant / Scientific developer at SURFsara

16:15 – 16:45: OpenNebula from the SysAdmin Perspective
Toshaan Barvhani, VanTosh

16:45 – 17:30: Open Space

There are still some seats available, register now! Looking forward to meeting you in Ede.

Why We Use OpenNebula at BIT

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BIT is a business to business internet service provider in the Netherlands specialized in colocation and managed hosting. BIT delivers to quality aware customers the backbone of their IT and internet infrastructure. Reliability is the focus of BIT’s services. BIT differentiates through its knowledge, years of experience and pragmatic solutions. It helps that all people of BIT share a passion for technology.

We wanted to have a Cloud Management Platform (CMP) that would be easy to manage and would not cost too much of our resources to keep up-to-date. It should also be easy to in-corporate in our infrastructure, be flexible and easy to adjust to our needs. As we’re an ISP operating our own infrastructure we were looking for software that was able to build a “virtual DataCenter”, more functionality then “just” be able to provision a bunch of resources. We have done internet research on some main CMP’s: OpenStack, Eucalyptus, oVirt, OpenNebula. Two of them were tested in a lab environment: OpenStack and OpenNebula. We had lots of trouble getting OpenStack working, hit some bugs, etc. In the end we could never get it to do what we wanted. It became clear the project is moving fast, at least code was flying around, subprojects became different entities of themselves, etc. We were worried it would take a lot of time to get it all running, let alone upgrade to newer versions.

OpenNebula worked pretty much out of the box, besides a bug with OpenvSwitch that stood in the way at first. We wanted to have a platform that would be able to work with different hypervisors. We’re using KVM now, but for one reason or the other VMware, XEN, or Hyper-V should be possible. We didn’t want to restrict ourselves to only one (that’s why oVirt didn’t make it). Besides that it should be easy to understand how things are tied together, basically KISS. If systems get overly complex sooner or later you get bitten by them. You don’t have complete oversight of every little component and when the shit hits the fan you don’t know were to start cleaning …

OpenNebula core itself might be pretty complex but most of the work is being done by drivers. Drivers that are most of the time easy to understand shell script doing stuff. Using commands that sysadmins are already familiar with, and therefore aren’t scary, and easy to debug. OpenNebula has quite a bit of interfaces. A nice WebGUI always helps to get familiar with a project. If you can just “click” something together that actually works it’s pretty impressive. But the OCCI interface and XML-API are really useful to enable integration with our workflow and administrative systems, especially with the nifty “hooks” feature.

DSC_3649 copy


OSS to us is more that just “free to use” software, although the liberal license makes it easy to just “start using” without the need to worry about all kind of licensing issues. It gives you the possibility to, if needed, make your own adjustments and fit your use case. OpenNebula is flexible enough to extend without the need for “hacking the source”. Although it’s possible it’s (most of the time) not needed, which is a big plus because it makes following “upstream” easy. But OSS by itself is not enough for a project to be successful and succeed. It’s about the way the software is developed that is of vital importance.  The OpenNebula way of developing software is open, and user focused, The “voice” of the community really matters.  The cliche “software made with and for the community” really applies here. If users get (positive) feedback about their input they feel appreciated and be more “connected” to the project. The “atmosphere” on the mailing list is friendly and open. No flame wars, or negativism here, so it keeps users “in” instead of pushing them away.

DSC_7056

 

In a nutshell, the benefits of using OpenNebula are:

  • Simple but powerful / flexible
  • Works out of the box
  • Easy to maintain / upgrade
  • (API) Interface(s)
  • OSS
  • Great community / development organization (that became obvious as soon as we joined the mailing list)

And the benefits of using OSS:

  • Source available (i.e. able to audit code, adjust code, etc)
  • Be able to influence the (feature) roadmap by joining the community
  • Quicker development (more potential developers)
  • OSS models most of the time have an easy way to communicate with developers. With (big) commercial organizations this is often not possible or very difficult. It’s all about technical excellence, not about profit.

Balance between User Base and Community in OpenStack and OpenNebula

In our last post “OpenNebula vs. OpenStack: User Needs vs. Vendor Driven” we stated that “OpenStack penetration in the market is relatively small compared with the investment made by vendors and VCs”. We have received several emails from people asking for the numbers that support this statement. This conclusion arises from the comparison between OpenNebula and OpenStack user base, a well as between the resources invested in development and marketing by each of them.

User Base

OpenStack is experiencing explosive growth in the number of developers, with more than 200 companies contributing code, 15,000 people and 850 companies involved according to its web site, and almost 1,000 developers involved in its latest release. However, the number of users and the size of the deployments are not that impressive, at least compared with this software development force.

Let us compare the user base of OpenNebula and OpenStack by using their latest surveys:

  • According to the most recent OpenStack user survey (November 2013), they received 827 responses, and 387 were deployments. In the 80% of these deployments the number of nodes was below 100, and only 11 deployments with more than 1,000 nodes (hypervisors).
  • On the other hand, in the latest OpenNebula survey (November 2012), OpenNebula received 2,500 responses, 820 of these were deployments. In the 70% of these deployments the number of nodes was below 100 nodes, and 99 deployments have more than 500 nodes (hypervisors).

nodes

We avoid giving references to featured users, both projects could put on the table good references of large-scale cloud deployments. The surveys show that OpenNebula and OpenStack are achieving a similar level of deployment. However, OpenStack presents a ratio 1/40 between deployments in the survey and number of people involved, a ratio 1/3 between deployments and developers, and a ratio 1/2 between deployments and companies involved. Not every company contributed to the survey?.

We could also use the volume of web searches according to Google Trends to compare the impact of both projects. The ratio in the number of searchers between OpenNebula and OpenStack during the last 12 years is 1/20. This mainly reflects the successful marketing of OpenStack. OpenNebula mainly invests its resources in developing technology and serving its users, being really vendor agnostic and free of marketing.

There is also a quarterly comparative analysis of the community activity (mailing lists traffic mostly) of the four main open-source cloud management platforms: OpenStack, OpenNebula, Eucalyptus and CloudStack. The number of threads and participants in OpenStack is one order of magnitude higher than in OpenNebula. This mostly reflects a higher number of developers. Moreover, it is also worth noting that development coordination in OpenNebula is done through a redmine portal and not through a mailing list.

Resources Invested

We conservatively estimate the investment in OpenStack is approximately $300 million per year:

  • OpenStack Havana involved 950 developers almost completely hired by vendors. This is approximately $150 Million per year
  • OpenStack Foundation budget is approximately $10 Million per year
  • Marketing costs, i.e. marketing staff and external marketing programs, can be estimated in tens of millions per year
  • Just seven of the many start-ups involved in OpenStack have raised $120 million from VC. Assuming this is for 3 years. This is approximately $40 million per year
  • There are other direct costs from other many companies, there are almost 1,000 companies involved, that are also allocating resources to development, training, documentation,…, a big overhead in indirect costs, and of course opportunity costs

So $300 million per year is a good conservative estimate. We have seen other estimations above $0.5 billion per year, some reaching to $1 billion per year. In any case, over a few years, it’s billions. Will these companies ever get their money back?. I see VC’s starting to ask “Where’s our future money?”. Summarizing, a relatively small user base, and so penetration in the market, compared with the investment made by vendors and VCs. OpenNebula, with a budget at least two orders of magnitude lower, is achieving a similar user base. You can draw your own conclusions.

OpenNebula Newsletter – February 2014

We want to let you know about what we are up to with the main news from the last month regarding the OpenNebula project, including what you can expect in the following months.

Technology

As part of our commitment to solve bugs reported by the OpenNebula community, a new maintenance release for 4.4 Retina, 4.4.1  was released. This release only includes bug fixes and is a recommended update for everyone running any 3.x or 4.x version of OpenNebula, whom for any particular reason do not want to upgrade their cloud manager to the latest available OpenNebula version.

OpenNebula 4.6 is just around the corner, with the beta release just days away. The team is now deep into the testing and certification process, and finishing some wrinkles in the new features.

The Sunstone interface is getting a facelift, with various JS & CSS components being updated. Hard work, but it pays off with a modern and cleaner interface. Check out the pic!

 

The other significant features that will be present in OpenNebula 4.6 includes the ability to achieve a federation using OpenNebulas (yes, plural is coming!) at different datacenters. The replication would be performed at the DB level, sharing the users, groups, ACLs and zone pools, while the other information would be kept locally and represent local resources. Groups would be able to have Resource Providers (basically, clusters in one local or remote zone) to conform Virtual Datacenters, thus allowing a cloud partition to enable real and isolated multi-tenancy. Check out the screencast on partitioning clouds with vDCs to get a feel on this new functionality.

Another cool feature that will be present in 4.6 is the ability to import OVAs into OpenNebula. The functionality is being implemented in AppMarket, and will be a complete translation and import of all the resources defined in the OVA: disks, capacity, network… even with the ability to change the disks format.

The AppMarket component has been updated to extend its functionality to enable the management and processing of OVA files. A new component AppMarket Worker is introduced, which handles the OVA package treatment (download, unpack, OVF parsing) and image format conversion. The release also features a new API and a new AppMarket interface via Sunstone.
Other aspects that are being revisited are storage backends, virtual networking, datastore, image and VM management and Sunstone. You can find a comprehensive list here.

Some of the above features have been sponsored by Produban  in the context of the Fund a Feature program.

Community

The OpenNebula community is as vibrant and active as ever. We want to highlight the great user story told by the people behind runtastic, the popular fitness app. The story is about the migration from a huge german webhoster to private cloud run by them, with the ability to burst their peaks into a public cloud like Amazon EC2. It makes an interesting read.

There has been a lot of feedback on the development portal, suggesting new features and reporting bugs. We want to thank you all for this, we really appreciate it. This is what makes OpenNebula a great software, it won’t be the same without you!

Outreach

First things first, this year’s OpenNebula Conference will be held in Berlin as well, 2-4 of December, 2014. If you want to repeat or find out how it is for yourself, save the date!

There are two articles posted this month comparing OpenNebula with other similar projects which we think are worth reading. First one compares OpenNebula vs OpenStack, while the second extends the comparison with VMware and Ganeti.

We are setting up a number of OpenNebula TechDays around the world. These events are designed to learn about OpenNebula with a hands-on cloud installation and operation workshop, and presentations from community members and users. If you are interested in hosting or sponsoring one, let us know!.

The first TechDay is happening in Ede, Netherlands, and it is hosted by BIT, a dutch internet service provider. The call for sponsors and for speakers is not closed yet so if you are interested drop us a line. Upcoming TechDays will be held in Boca Raton, Chicago, Palo Alto (USA), Aveiro (Portugal), Barcelona (Spain), Munich (Germany), Lyon (France) and Timisoara (Romania).

Throughout february the OpenNebula team was present at the CentOS Dojo and Fosdem, with great feedback and exciting comments including a productive talk with folks from the GlusterFS project. It was present also at CloudScape VI in Brussels and the Cloud Expo Europe in London, with a thoroughly engaged audience in the configuration tutorial, showing great interest and giving excepcional feedback.

The following events are happening this month, with the participation of an OpenNebula team member:

During the following months, members of the OpenNebula team will be speaking in the following events:

Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Events page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

A New Cloud Provisioning Model: vDCs as a Service

Three years ago, driven by the needs of some of our larger users, we incorporated support for Virtual Data Centers (vDCs) and multiple Zones into OpenNebula 3.0. Since that time, this innovative vDC functionality has helped many IT organizations to make the transition towards the next generation of cloud infrastructures supporting on-demand provisioning of multiple fully-isolated vDCs. Thanks to the feedback received by many of these organizations during the last years, we have improved this functionality and its integration with the rest of subsystems. This post describes the new cloud provisioning model based on vDCs that is brought by OpenNebula 4.6. The new model offers an integrated and comprehensive framework for resource allocation and isolation in federated data centers and hybrid cloud deployments.

The Infrastructure Perspective

Common large IT shops have multiple Data Centers (DCs), each one of them consisting of several physical Clusters of infrastructure resources (hosts, networks and storage). These Clusters could present different architectures and software/hardware execution environments to fulfill the needs of different workload profiles. Moreover, many organizations have access to external public clouds to build hybrid cloud scenarios where the private capacity of the Data Centers is supplemented with resources from external clouds to address peaks of demand. Sysadmins need a single comprehensive framework to dynamically allocate all these available resources to the multiple groups of users.

For example, you could have two Data Centers in different geographic locations, Europe and USA West Coast, and an agreement for cloudbursting with two cloud providers, Amazon and SoftLayer. Each Data Center runs its own full OpenNebula deployment.

Resources
The Organizational Perspective

Users are organized in Groups (also called Projects, Domains, Tenants…). A Group is an authorization boundary that can be seen as a business unit if you are considering it as private cloud or as a complete new company if it is public cloud. A powerful, configurable ACL system is needed to enable different authorization scenarios, from the definition of group Admins to the privileges of the users that can deploy virtual machines. Each Group can execute different types of workload profiles with different performance and security requirements.

For example, you can think Web Development, Human Resources, and Big Data Analysis as business units represented by Groups in OpenNebula.

Groups

The following are common enterprise use cases in large cloud computing deployments:

  • On-premise Private Clouds Serving Multiple Projects, Departments, Units or Organizations. On-premise private clouds in large organizations require powerful and flexible mechanisms to manage the access privileges to the virtual and physical infrastructure and to dynamically allocate the available resources. In these scenarios, the Cloud Administrator would define a Group for each Department, dynamically allocating resources according to their needs, and delegating the internal administration of the Group to the Department IT Administrator.
  • Cloud Providers Offering Virtual Private Cloud Computing. Cloud providers providing customers with a fully-configurable and isolated environment where they have full control and capacity to administer its users and resources. This combines a public cloud with the control usually seen in a personal private cloud system.

A New Cloud Provisioning Model Based on vDCs

A Group is simply a boundary, you need to populate resources into the Group which can be consumed by the users of the Group. These resources are obtained from Resource Providers that can be located in different Data Centers, ending up with the creation of a vDC. A Resource Provider is a Cluster of infrastructure resources (physical hosts, networks, datastores and external clouds).

For example, you could create three different vDCs:

  • BLUE: Allocation of (ClusterA@DC_West_Coast + Cloudbursting) to Web Development
  • RED: Allocation of (ClusterB@DC_West_Coast + ClusterA@DC_Europe + Cloudbursting) to Human Resources
  • GREEN: Allocation of (ClusterC@DC_West_Coast + ClusterB@DC_Europe) to Big Data Analysis

vdcs
A vDC is a fully-isolated virtual infrastructure environment where a Group of users, under the control of the vDC admin, can create and manage compute, storage and networking capacity. The users in the vDC, including the vDC administrator, would only see the virtual resources and not the underlying physical infrastructure. The physical resources allocated by the cloud administrator to the vDC can be completely dedicated to the vDC, providing isolation at the physical level too.

The privileges of the vDC users and the administrator regarding the operations over the virtual resources created by other users can be configured. In a typical scenario the vDC administrator can create virtual networks, upload and create images and templates, and monitor other users virtual resources, while the users can only instantiate virtual machines and virtual networks to create their services. The administrators of the vDC have full control over resources and can also create new users in the vDC.

UsersVDCs
Users can then access their vDC through any of the existing OpenNebula interfaces, such as the CLI, Sunstone, OCA, or the OCCI and AWS APIs. vDC administrators can manage their vDCs through the CLI or the vDC admin view in Sunstone. Cloud Administrators can manage the vDCs through the CLI or Sunstone.

The Cloud provisioning model based on vDCs enables an integrated, comprehensive framework to dynamically provision the infrastructure resources in large multi-datacenter environments to different customers, business units or groups. This brings several benefits:

  • Partitioning of cloud physical resources between Groups of users
  • Complete isolation of users, organizations or workloads
  • Allocation of Clusters with different levels of security, performance or high availability
  • Containers for the execution of software-defined data centers
  • Way of hiding physical resources from Group members
  • Simple federation, scalability and cloudbursting of private cloud infrastructures beyond a single cloud instance and data center

Want to Try?

The Beta release of OpenNebula 4.6 will be available in few days. In the meantime you can enjoy this screencast about partitioning clouds with vDCs.

We are looking forward to your feedback!.

Partitioning Clouds with Virtual Data Centers (vDCs)

OpenNebula 4.6 is slowly cooking, getting ready to get out of the oven and being spun around the certification carrousel. We’ve created a screencast to show on of the most interesting features that will be available in the next, shiny new release: the ability to manage Virtual Data Centers natively in OpenNebula, via Sunstone or the CLI.

First, let’s define some concepts. In OpenNebula, a Group (of users) is the authorization boundary. Authorization comes using ACLs  built in OpenNebula. ACLs model can be used to control who can manage the Group (that is, the Group admin) and who can deploy virtual machines. A Group can be seen as business unit if you are considering it as private cloud and complete new company if it is public cloud. You can think Human Resources, Marketing and Sales as business units represented by Groups in OpenNebula. Moreover, a Resource Provider is a OpenNebula Cluster of infrastructure resources (aggregation of physical hosts, virtual networks and datastores).

Combining the two above, OpenNebula can handle Virtual Data Centers (vDCs). vDCs are containers for the execution of virtual machines and a way of hiding physical resources from Group members. A Group is simply a boundary, you need to populate resources within the Group which can be consumed by the users of the Group. These resources are obtained from Resource Providers, ending up with the creation of a vDC by combining a Group and one or more Resource Providers. These Resource Providers can reside in other other datacenters, thus achieving a DC federation. But this a story for another screencast ;)

For other interesting screencasts, please take a look to the screencasts page.

This new feature is funded by Produban in the context of the Fund a Feature Program.