AppMarket 2.0.2 Released!

We are pleased pleased to announce a new maintenance release of AppMarket. Release 2.0.2 solves issues reported by the community and has been verified to work with OpenNebula 4.8.

This release is part of the AppMarket 2.0.x series, which extended the AppMarket functionality by adding a new set of features that enables the management and processing of OVA files. A new component AppMarket Worker was introduced, which handles the OVA package treatment (download, unpack, OVF parsing) and image format conversion. This release also featured a new API, a new simplified import dialog, a new AppMarket interface via Sunstone, and handles VMware and VirtualBox OVAs.

Please consider that, although AppMarket is widely used by the OpenNebula users, this software has not gone through the same rigorous testing process as the main OpenNebula distribution.

Read more about the AppMarket 2.0.x series.

list_appliance_from_sunstone

 

OpenNebula TechDay / CentOS Dojo in Timisoara on 26-27 September 2014

The next OpenNebula TechDay will be a joint event with CentOS Dojo to be held in Timisoara (Romania) on the 26th and 27th of September. The event will start on the 26th at 15:00 with a OpenNebula on CentOS Hands-on tutorial and will continue on the 27th with a CentOS Dojo that will include presentations by OpenNebula users and experts.

Notice that you have two different registrations, one for the OpenNebula Hands-on Tutorial on the 26th and other for the CentOS Dojo on the 27h.

The event will be hosted by cloudbase  and UnifiedPost, a big thanks to making the OpenNebula Tech Day possible. We hope see you there!

 

 

2014 OpenNebula Cloud Architecture Survey Results

Executive Summary

The results of this survey were collected during July and August of 2014 from the OpenNebula open source cloud management platform community with regards to the type of cloud deployment and its main architectural components. The aim of the survey is to acquire information in order to improve the support for the most demanded infrastructure platforms and deployments.

Since the foundation of the open-source project in November 2007, OpenNebula has been downloaded more than 200,000 times from the project site (120,000 times since our last survey in September 2012), not including other software repositories or third-party distributions.

Regarding the use of OpenNebula, the Survey shows that 42% of the deployments are in Industry and 14% in Research Centers. 74% of the organizations are in Europe, Russia or USA. 88% of the respondents use OpenNebula to build a private cloud. When asked about the type of workload, 62% said that they use OpenNebula for running production workloads.

Regarding the size of the clouds, 10% of the deployments have more 500 physical nodes. 44% of the deployments consist of more than one OpenNebula zone and 4% are running more than 10 zones. One of the companies reported a workload of 200,000 VMs. Among the advanced components offered by OpenNebula, High Availability, with 67%, is the most widely used or planned to use, which is closely aligned with the top usage of OpenNebula in production environments.

Regarding the building blocks of the cloud, KVM at 48% and VMware at 30% are the dominant hypervisors, and CentOS at 46% and Ubuntu at 36% are the most widely used linux distributions for OpenNebula clouds. The preferred choices for the storage back-ends are shared FS and SSH with a 52% and 36% ratio respectively. The most widely used Configuration Management Systems are Puppet and Ansible with a 37% and 14% respectively. Regarding networking, most of the deployments, a 49%, use the Standard Linux Bridge for network configuration, 38% use Open vSwitch, and 30% use 802.1Q.

In comparison to the previous survey findings in 2012, the relevant changes are that CentOS has displaced Ubuntu as the most widely linux distribution to build OpenNebula clouds, and a growth in the number of production deployments from 42% to 62% and in the number of public clouds that has doubled from 21% to 40%.

Although more than 2,000 users took part of the survey, we have only included in the analysis those respondents using OpenNebula 4.x (latest series) and who we deem reliable because they have provided identification details that allow us to verify the answers of the survey. This is important given that our main aim is to have accurate and useful information about OpenNebula deployments.

Last, but not least, when asked about what you like most about OpenNebula, most users, a 76%, answered because of its simplicity, and 69% and 65% answered because of its flexibility and openness. These results are aligned with our our mission — to become the simplest cloud enabling platform — and our purpose — to bring simplicity to the private and hybrid enterprise cloud. OpenNebula exists to help companies build simple, cost-effective, reliable, open enterprise clouds on existing IT infrastructure.

BIG THANKS to all the organizations that have contributed to the survey!

A. About the Organization

42% of the respondents indicated that they work for industry, while 14% work for research centers.

Type_of_OrganizationType of Organization

 

54% of the deployments are in Europe and Russia. This means a small increase compared with previous survey where the number of deployments in Europe and Russia was 49%. 80% of the respondents are located in Europe, Russia, North America, China, Japan or Korea.

2_Geographic_RegionGeographic Region

 

63% of the organizations are small companies with fewer than 100 employees, and only 5% has more than 10,000 employees.

3_EmployeesNumber of Employees in the Organization

B. About the Cloud

88% of the respondents are running a private cloud for internal operations, while 40% are running a public cloud to offer utility services. Compared with 2012, the number of public clouds has doubled from 21%. This is aligned with the quickly growing number of hosting companies that are adopting OpenNebula to offer cloud services.

4_Cloud_TypeType of Cloud (people may select more than one checkbox)

 

76% of the respondents are running a non-critical environment or peripheral installations for running testing or development applications, while 62% are using the cloud for running production workloads. The number of production deployments has grown from 42% in 2012.

5_Workload_TypeType of Workload (people may select more than one checkbox)

 

The number of users in most of the clouds, a 71%, is fewer than 100. Many of these deployments use OpenNebula as virtual data center infrastructure manager and not as a cloud provisioning platform.

6_Number_of_UsersNumber of Users

C. About the Cloud Architecture

52% of the OpenNebula deployments have more than 10 nodes, and 10% of the deployments have more than 500 physical nodes. The number of very large-scale deployments has slightly fallen from 13% achieved in 2012.

6_Number_of_UsersNumber of Nodes

 

44% of the deployments consist of more than one OpenNebula zone, and 4% are running more than 10 zones.

8_Number_of_ZonesNumber of Zones

 

KVM at 48% and VMware at 28% are the most widely used hypervisors. Next one is Xen at 11%. Hyper-V and Xen Cloud Platform usage has fallen from a 11% in 2012 to a 4%, mostly because these two hypervisors are not supported by the OpenNebula distribution. They can be used through community plugins.

9_HypervisorsHypervisor  (people may select more than one checkbox)

 

52% of the OpenNebula deployments use a shared file system; 36% of users use the ssh datastore; 30% use VMware FS; and 42% of the users use a block device architecture based on LVM or iSCSI. GlusterFS and Ceph are used by 18% and 17% of the organizations respectively.

10_StorageStorage Configuration  (people may select more than one checkbox)

 

Most of the deployments, a 49%, use the Standard Linux Bridge for network configuration; 38% uses Open vSwitch; and 30% uses 802.1Q.

11_NetworkNetwork Configuration  (people may select more than one checkbox)

 

92% of the clouds use the monitoring system provided by OpenNebula, and 37% use a third-party monitoring system.

12_MonitoringMonitoring Configuration  (people may select more than one checkbox)

 

Regarding authentication, most of the organizations, a 65%, are using the built-in user/password system, while SSH and LDAP, with 43% and 27%, are the more popular external authentication systems.

13_AuthenticationAuthentication Configuration  (people may select more than one checkbox)

 

CentOS at 46% and Ubuntu at 36% are the most widely used linux distributions for building OpenNebula clouds. In the previous survey in 2012, Ubuntu was the most widely used with a 31%. Notice that in this last survey we allowed respondents to select more than one operating system.

14_Operating_SystemOperating System  (people may select more than one checkbox)

 

Puppet is used by 37% of the OpenNebula users. 37% have reported that they do not use any Configuration Management Systems (CMS) as the existing OpenNebula contextualization system and cloud-init support meet their needs. Ansible ,with a 14%, is the next popular CMS within the OpenNebula community.

15_CMS

Configuration Management System  (people may select more than one checkbox)

 

Among the advanced components offered by OpenNebula, High Availability, with a 67%, is the most widely used or planned to use. Flow multi-VM and DC federation are the next features with a 46%.

16_Advanced_ComponentsAdvanced Components (people may select more than one checkbox)

D. Why OpenNebula

Basically OpenNebula is used for its simplicity, flexibility, and openness.

17_Why_OpenNebulaWhy OpenNebula (people may select more than one checkbox)

 

OpenNebula Newsletter – August 2014

We want to let you know about what we are up to with the main news from the last month regarding the OpenNebula project, including what you can expect in the following months.

We have created a new user survey that will take you only 5 minutes to complete. As an open-source community, it is very important for us to have information about your deployment. Doing so you will have influence over the project and software direction, and will help us improve the support for most demanded infrastructure platforms and configurations.

Technology

This summer month of August has been the host for the new, shiny and latest release of OpenNebula: 4.8 Lemon Slice. Did you try it out? We would love to hear your feedback, so we have time to include possible changes in the next maintenance release. You can reach us through the user mailing list, give it a spin!

This new version of OpenNebula comes with several goodies that we would like to highlight. Sticking with our vision of bringing simplicity to cloud management, this release comes with improvements in the recently added Cloud View portal, now with the ability to control flows, as well with a new interface designed for Virtual Datacenter administrators (VDCAdmin View).

Another important addition happened in the domain of cloudbursting: support for two new public cloud providers (Microsoft Azure and IBM SoftLayer) has been added, widening the range of possibilities to offload VMs in case the local infrastructure is saturated. Moreover, Virtual Networks underwent a thorough redesign, now their definition is no longer restricted to the fixed and ranged model, but rather they can include any combination of ranges to accommodate any address distribution. Dig in to see all the nuts and bolts!

“OpenNebula 4.8 is helping us fulfil one of the most important needs of our users: a simple and unified deployment cycle in all of our environments, including a transparent hybrid cloud integration with the main public cloud providers. I would like to thank C12G for their Fund a Feature program,” said Daniel Concepcion, IT Managing Director at Produban.

”By offering support for Microsoft Azure in OpenNebula 4.8, we’re further simplifying the developer experience across Microsoft’s private, public and hosted cloud platforms,” said Gianugo Rabellino, Senior Director of Open Source Communities at Microsoft Open Technologies, Inc. “The Azure drivers in OpenNebula are certified to ensure compatibility, providing developers with a solution that will work now, and in the future.”

So now is time to stand back and let you ride the Lemon Slice, let us know how is doing. Meanwhile, we will be busy (as always!) carefully planning the roadmap for the next stable release (yes, we are relentless!). Curious on how we define the roadmap? Take a look at this page, where you can also find how to contribute to the list of features that will be tackled in this next release.

Community

Even for a traditionally quiet month as it is usually the case with August, the OpenNebula community hasn’t stop buzzing. It’s really nice to have you there folks.

A nice OpenNebula Cookbook for Chef was released by Vaamo. These recipes go a long way for deploying and setting up a cloud infrastructure based on OpenNebula.

It is worth also pointing out that OpenNebula scored 3rd in the Top IaaS Open Source projects, in a survey conducted by The New Stack and Linux.com, as presented recently in the CloudOpen in Chicago. We want to point out that, according to this, OpenNebula is also the 1st vendor-free IaaS Open Source project, as well as the 1st non-US project of its kind. Way to go OpenNebulers!

Top IaaS Open Source Projects

It is also nice to become aware of more business powering their solutions with OpenNebula. And if they top it with an explanation of why they chose your favorite CMP, then kudos and let us wish all the best.

The community being great can also be deduced from excellent posts such as the one by AZNS, covering with great detail the datacenter federation capabilities of OpenNebula, including internal design, deployment recommendations and, overall, perfectly grasping the philosophy of this new feature.

Feedback from the community has started trickling. And seriously, we want to thank all of you for this, it is an essential part of the process that makes OpenNebula a mature technology as it is today. For instance, we love to be aware of any member of the community becomes aware of a new functionality (we blush!) , but, even more than this, we appreciate all the detailed bug reports done through any of the channels, being Twitter, the OpenNebula users mailing list and the development portal. Also, extensive testing and benchmarking as performed by key members of the community is more than welcome, keep it up!

Outreach

This year’s OpenNebula Conference, to be held in Berlin 2-4 of December, 2014 is approaching fast. The final agenda is now available at the conference page. This years will offer the chance to learn how folks from PuppetLabs, E-Post, Deloitte and many other companies are using OpenNebula. Moreover, check out the venue for the evening event, lush isn’t it?. If you want to repeat or find out how it is for yourself, save the date and register!.

Members of the OpenNebula team participated in August in a Centos Dojo in Cologne. Also, a Centos Dojo was held in Paris, and we also participated there. Check out what went on on those events.

OPenNebula at CentOS Dojo at Paris

 

We have upcoming TechDays in future months, if you are interested in OpenNebula you can check the project page to find out if we are travelling somewhere near you: Timisoara, Barcelona, Chicago, Aveiro, Munich … and many more to come! As a bonus, both the Timisoara and Barcelona TechDays will be jointly held with the CentOS Dojo.

Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Events page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

OpenNebula 4.8: The Cloud View Gets OneFlow Services

OpenNebula has had the OneFlow component for quite some time. For 4.8, we have made it even easier to use for end users, integrating it with the intuitive Sunstone Cloud View.

OneFlow allows users and administrators to define, execute and manage multi-tiered applications, or services composed of interconnected Virtual Machines with deployment dependencies between them. These groups of Virtual Machines are deployed and managed as a single entity.

One of the new features in 4.8 is the definition of dynamic networks for OneFlow Services. This allows you to create more generic Service Templates. For example, the same Service Template can be used by users of different VDC’s that may have access to different Virtual Networks.

The following diagram shows a sample Service with two roles, Master and Slave. The Slave role contains 3 VMs, and must be deployed after the Master role VM is running. There are two networks, “Internal” and “Public”.

flow-diagram

The Service Template must be defined by the cloud administrator, and it looks like this in Sunstone:

flow-wizard-1 flow-wizard-2

As you can see, the Public and Internal networks are defined in the Service Template. These networks are not attached to any specific OpenNebula Virtual Network yet, that will happen when the users instantiate the Service.

The slave role has a VM Template defined to start the 3 VMs. The VM Templates can be configured with user inputs, another new feature of OpenNebula 4.8. This will help you to create a customized instance each time a new Service is created. In this example, we will ask the user for a couple of configuration attributes in the master role VM Template:

template-wizard

Now everything is ready to be published. This is how the Service Template will look for the end users:

flow-cloud-1 flow-cloud-2 flow-cloud-3

After the Service creation, the users will get a nice interface that hides most of the complexity behind it:

flow-cloud-4

We hope that you find these new features useful to prepare complex deployments for your users. You can read more in our documentation, and see more new features in our screencasts. If you can’t upgrade to 4.8 yet, give it a try in your laptop with one of our sandbox machines.

OpenNebula 4.8 Lemon Slice is Out!

The OpenNebula team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of the final version of OpenNebula 4.8, codename Lemon SliceThis release brings significant improvements in different aspects. Sticking with our vision of bringing simplicity to cloud management, there are improvements in the recently added Cloud View portal, designed for end users. One significant advantage of the new portal is the ability to control flows, groups of interconnected Virtual Machines that conform a service. Based on this Cloud View, a Virtual Datacenter administrators view has been included (VDCAdmin View), which enables VDC admins to easily manage the VDC users and resources.

An important highlight in this release is the vast improvement made to the hybrid model. Support for two new public cloud providers has been added, widening the range of possibilities to offload VMs in case the local infrastructure is saturated. The hybrid model in OpenNebula enables a centralized management of both local and remote resources for the cloud administrator, and a transparent consumption of these resources for the end user. With these two new additions, namely support for Microsoft Azure and IBM SoftLayer, OpenNebula is increasing the possibilities to build powerful, robust, cost and performance efficient cloud infrastructures across administrative domains and public cloud providers.

The OneFlow component also has been improved, specially OneGate, making sharing service information among VMs possible. Flows are now easier than ever to build and consume, since details like the virtual network the flow are going to use are defined later by the user, so the administrator doesn’t have to deal with all the possible combinations. Moreover, Virtual Networks underwent a thorough redesign. Definition of virtual networks are no longer restricted to the fixed and ranged model, but rather they can include any combination of ranges to accommodate any address distribution. Moreover, end users can now reserve a range or IP addresses for their own use at a later time.

Finally, several improvements are scattered across every other OpenNebula component: improvements in quotas management, multi boot available through Sunstone, availability of Windows contextualization packages, new raw device mapping datastore, better Ceph drivers, possibility to clone images across datastores …. ladies and gentlemen, you are in for a treat.

This is a stable release and so a recommended update. It incorporate important improvement since 4.6 and several bug fixes since 4.8 Beta. Be sure to check the compatibility and upgrade guides. We invite you to download it and to check the QuickStart guides, as well as to browse the documentation, which has also been properly updated. 

As usual OpenNebula releases are named after a Nebula. The Lemon Slice nebula (IC 3568)  is a planetary nebula that is 1.3 kiloparsecs (4500 ly) away from Earth in the constellation of Camelopardalis. It is a relatively young nebula and has a core diameter of only about 0.4 light years.

The new features for Cloud View and VDCAdmin View introduced in OpenNebula 4.8 were funded by Produban in the context of the Fund a Feature Program. The new feature that redefined virtual networks in OpenNebula 4.8 were funded by BlackBerry in the context of the Fund a Feature Program.

More information

OpenNebula Integrates with Azure to Build Hybrid Clouds

Today we are sharing exciting news about the expansion of the number of public clouds supported by OpenNebula to build hybrid cloud deployments. As a result of the collaboration between OpenNebula and Microsoft, a new set of plug-ins to support Microsoft Azure has been included in OpenNebula. This partnership has been announced today by Microsoft Open Technologies at the O’Reilly Open Source Convention (OSCON).

“With this set of plug-ins, IT pros and system integrations can use OpenNebula’s rich set of infrastructure management tools to manage cloud deployments across Microsoft’s private, public and hosted cloud platforms.”

The Beta version of  OpenNebula 4.8 bringing the new drivers was released today and is available for testing. The integration has been carried out using the Microsoft Azure SDK for Ruby, which interacts with the Azure REST API, enabling a complete control of the lifecycle of Virtual Machines in a transparent way within an OpenNebula cloud. Thanks to these new plug-ins, private resources can be easily supplemented with resources from Azure to meet fluctuating demands.

So far the only public cloud officially supported by OpenNebula to build hybrid cloud deployments was Amazon AWS. Supporting multiple public cloud providers opens the possibility of defining pre-determined schedule or performance-based policies for the execution of applications in different clouds, that can be fine tuned to achieve an optimal placement in terms of performance and cost. This new support also enables the ability to meet services constraints regarding special functionality offered by a subset of the supported public cloud providers, like for instance high availability.

Need more information? You are welcome to use the OpenNebula community instruments to ask around (for instance, the users mailing list is a good place to pose your questions).

As always, we value your feedback and contributions to this new feature!

OpenNebula 4.8 beta released!

The OpenNebula team is really happy to release the first beta for version 4.8 (4.7.80). In this version, alongside several fixes, we have been working on some new features:

  • Improvements to the Cloud View interface like OneFlow integration
  • New VDC admin view that matches the Cloud View.
  • New virtual network model that make its configuration and management more flexible with address ranges.
  • IP reservation.
  • Network interface default configuration
  • Quotas can now specify a value of 0 to disable certain objects for users or groups.
  • Logs now have the zone ID so its easier to parse in a centralized syslog configuration.
  • New datastore to use local block devices.
  • Inter datastore image clone.
  • Support for RBD format 2 in CEPH drivers
  • IO throttling for disk devices.
  • New hybrid drivers for Microsoft Azure and IBM Softlayer services.
  • OneGate can now be used to get information about all the VMs in a service.
  • OneFlow can wait until a VM phones home before starting the rest of VMs.
  • Network configuration in a flow can be specified per role.
  • User input on template instantiation for certain VM parameters.
  • Default view for a group in Sunstone.
  • Instantiate VMs on hold.
  • Boot order can be selected from Sunstone.

You can find more information about the new features in the release notes.

In this new release we also start supporting RHEL/CentOS 7. We encourage everyone that is using or planning to use this distributions to try the new packages and fill any bugs found in them.

We have also created new repositories for this release so its easier to install and your 4.6 installations don’t upgrade automatically to it.

You can download the packages from the software page or use the new repositories. Now is the time to try it and fill bugs so we can fix them before the final release.

This new release code name is “Lemon Slice“. From Wikipedia:

lemon_slice

The Lemon slice nebula, also known as IC 3568, is a planetary nebula that is 1.3 kiloparsecs (4500 ly) away from Earth in the constellation of Camelopardalis (just 7.5 degrees from Polaris). It is a relatively young nebula and has a core diameter of only about 0.4 light years. The Lemon slice nebula is one of the most simple nebulae known, with an almost perfectly spherical morphology. It appears very similar to a lemon, for which it is named. The core of the nebula does not have a distinctly visible structure in formation and is mostly composed of ionized helium. The central star is a very hot and bright asymptotic red giant, and can be seen as a red-orange hue in an amateur’s telescope. A faint halo of interstellar dust surrounds the nebula.

Thank you all for the input, patches and bug reports that made this release possible.

OpenNebula Conf 2014: first speakers confirmed!

OpenNebulaConf

Hello dear fellows!

Today I’d like to remind you of hurrying up with sending your proposals for the OpenNebula Conf. July 15th will be your last chance to submit your talk and to join us as a speaker on December 2nd – 4th this year in Berlin. The scrimpers of you should also know that July 15th is the last day early bird tickets are on sale.

We already have some confirmed speakers, too. If you have a look at the event website, you can admire the abstracts of the talks of  Armin Deliomini (Runtastic) and Stefan Kooman (BIT.nl). Alberto Zuin (Moyd.co LTD) will follow soon.

Now ain’t that some good news?

Aftermath of the TechDays in Florida and Bay Area

We have had a great time in OpenNebula Cloud TechDays of the past weeks:

We had the chance to share the new features in OpenNebula 4.6 and the upcoming releases with all the attendess and have them build a fully working private cloud in just a matter of hours. Cloud computing has never been this easy!

But that’s not everything, we had really interesting talks, ranging from PaaS solutions based on OpenNebula: Megam – Cloud orchestrator for OpenNebula, open hardware iniciatives which are a great match for OpenNebula: OCP Open Rack, the renowned distributed object-store: Ceph for Cloud and Virtualization environments and more use cases.

So a big thank you all, for coming and attending the event, for your great feedback and excitement.

And of course big thanks to the hosts: TransUnion|TLOxp and Hyve Solutions for their amazing hospitality, organization and making these events a success!

techday

lego

upgrade

hyve-techday