OpenNebula 4.8: The Cloud View Gets OneFlow Services

OpenNebula has had the OneFlow component for quite some time. For 4.8, we have made it even easier to use for end users, integrating it with the intuitive Sunstone Cloud View.

OneFlow allows users and administrators to define, execute and manage multi-tiered applications, or services composed of interconnected Virtual Machines with deployment dependencies between them. These groups of Virtual Machines are deployed and managed as a single entity.

One of the new features in 4.8 is the definition of dynamic networks for OneFlow Services. This allows you to create more generic Service Templates. For example, the same Service Template can be used by users of different VDC’s that may have access to different Virtual Networks.

The following diagram shows a sample Service with two roles, Master and Slave. The Slave role contains 3 VMs, and must be deployed after the Master role VM is running. There are two networks, “Internal” and “Public”.

flow-diagram

The Service Template must be defined by the cloud administrator, and it looks like this in Sunstone:

flow-wizard-1 flow-wizard-2

As you can see, the Public and Internal networks are defined in the Service Template. These networks are not attached to any specific OpenNebula Virtual Network yet, that will happen when the users instantiate the Service.

The slave role has a VM Template defined to start the 3 VMs. The VM Templates can be configured with user inputs, another new feature of OpenNebula 4.8. This will help you to create a customized instance each time a new Service is created. In this example, we will ask the user for a couple of configuration attributes in the master role VM Template:

template-wizard

Now everything is ready to be published. This is how the Service Template will look for the end users:

flow-cloud-1 flow-cloud-2 flow-cloud-3

After the Service creation, the users will get a nice interface that hides most of the complexity behind it:

flow-cloud-4

We hope that you find these new features useful to prepare complex deployments for your users. You can read more in our documentation, and see more new features in our screencasts. If you can’t upgrade to 4.8 yet, give it a try in your laptop with one of our sandbox machines.

OpenNebula at CentOS Paris Dojo

We are happy to announce that OpenNebula will be at the upcoming CentOS Dojo Paris, France, which will take place on August 25th.

If you are interested in learning how to get a fully operational private cloud under CentOS you should definitely drop by this event. It’s going to be fun and exciting!

Here at OpenNebula we really enjoy CentOS Dojos, it’s a wonderful occastion to meet with the local group of sysadmins, talk about experiences and to learn a lot about how to really get things done.

Registrations run through EventBrite. More info at the Dojo page.

dojo

OpenNebula Newsletter – July 2014

We want to let you know about what we are up to with the main news from the last month regarding the OpenNebula project, including what you can expect in the following months. This month’s newsletter is slightly overdue because the team has been 100% dedicated to the release.

We have created a new user survey that will take you only 5 minutes to complete. As an open-source community, it is very important for us to have information about your deployment. Doing so you will have influence over the project and software direction, and will help us improve the support for most demanded infrastructure platforms and configurations.

Technology

This past month, the OpenNebula team had only one, well defined focus: a new stable release. After one beta version, the team is very proud of the release of OpenNebula 4.8, codenamed Lemon Slice. This release brings significant improvements in different aspects. Sticking with our vision of bringing simplicity to cloud management, this release comes with improvements in the recently added Cloud View portal, now with the ability to control flows, as well with a new interface designed for Virtual Datacenter administrators (VDCAdmin View).

The hybrid model has been one of the principal actors of Lemon Slice. Support for two new public cloud providers (Microsoft Azure and IBM SoftLayer) have been added, widening the range of possibilities to offload VMs in case the local infrastructure is saturated. The hybrid model in OpenNebula enables a centralized management of both local and remote resources for the cloud administrator, and a transparent consumption of these resources by the end user. With these two new additions, OpenNebula is increasing the possibilities to build powerful, robust, cost and performance efficient cloud infrastructures across administrative domains and public cloud providers.

The OneFlow component also has been improved, specially OneGate, making sharing service information among VMs possible. Flows are now easier than ever to build and consume, since details like the virtual network the flow are going to use are defined later by the user, so the administrator doesn’t have to deal with all the possible combinations.

Moreover, Virtual Networks underwent a thorough redesign. Definition of virtual networks are no longer restricted to the fixed and ranged model, but rather they can include any combination of ranges to accommodate any address distribution. Moreover, end users can now reserve a range or IP addresses for their own use at a later time.

Finally, several improvements are scattered across every other OpenNebula component: improvements in quotas management, multi boot available through Sunstone, availability of Windows contextualization packages, new raw device mapping datastore, better Ceph drivers, possibility to clone images across datastores …. ladies and gentlemen, you are in for a treat.

Community

This month has been specially interesting for the movement in the OpenNebula community. Most noticeable, without doubt, is the announcement by two computer industry giants such as Microsoft and IBM of their collaboration with the OpenNebula project.

Microsoft announced in the OSCON 2014 their willingness to tightly collaborate with OpenNebula in order to build Microsoft Azure support within your favourite Cloud Management Platform.

On the other hand, IBM SoftLayer announced in their blog their support for extending OpenNebula hybrid model to be able to outsource VM workload to the SoftLayer cloud. Their interest comes from existing SoftLayer users that seek to complement their public cloud with in house private clouds run by OpenNebula:

Some of our largest customers have already begun using OpenNebula to manage their hybrid cloud environments, so official support for the SoftLayer cloud in OpenNebula is a huge benefit to them (and to us)

Needless to say, we are really excited about this collaborations: building hybrid clouds with OpenNebula is now richer and more powerful than ever.

The community is determined to make the OpenNebula team happy with these little pearls: OpenNebula 4.6.2 cloud running on ARM board of Android TV stick. We want to give a big thanks from here to Carlo Daffara and Vincent V.d. Kussen for their intensive testing, pushing OpenNebula to its limits. Appreciate that! We also appreciate mini tutorials to start using OpenNebula, like this one.

Special thanks are due to the Terradue folks for .NET API to the OpenNebula world. Also, it is very interesting the integration between OpenNebula and Bacula proposed by Rentalia.

Check out the comparative made by Bitergia in the OSCON about the OpenNebula project and its codebase, it is pretty interesting.

We want to thank the community for their feedback, which has proven to be a very important asset turning the beta 4.8 version into the stable Lemon Slice that has been just released. You are the real MVP!

Outreach

As usual, first things first, this year’s OpenNebula Conference will be held in Berlin as well, 2-4 of December, 2014. The final agenda is now available at the conference page. This years will offer the chance to learn how folks from PuppetLabs, E-Post, Deloitte and many other companies are using OpenNebula. If you want to repeat or find out how it is for yourself, save the date and register!

OpenNebula Project Director gave several seminars on cloud computing Berkeley and Stanford this last month. Also, members of the OpenNebula team participated in July in a Centos Dojo in Cologne.

BuLtQ_4CcAAJz8m

We have upcoming TechDays in future months, if you are interested in OpenNebula you can check the project page to find out if we are travelling somewhere near you: Timisoara, Barcelona, Chicago, Aveiro … and many more to come!!

Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Events page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

OpenNebula 4.8 Lemon Slice is Out!

The OpenNebula team is pleased to announce the immediate availability of the final version of OpenNebula 4.8, codename Lemon SliceThis release brings significant improvements in different aspects. Sticking with our vision of bringing simplicity to cloud management, there are improvements in the recently added Cloud View portal, designed for end users. One significant advantage of the new portal is the ability to control flows, groups of interconnected Virtual Machines that conform a service. Based on this Cloud View, a Virtual Datacenter administrators view has been included (VDCAdmin View), which enables VDC admins to easily manage the VDC users and resources.

An important highlight in this release is the vast improvement made to the hybrid model. Support for two new public cloud providers has been added, widening the range of possibilities to offload VMs in case the local infrastructure is saturated. The hybrid model in OpenNebula enables a centralized management of both local and remote resources for the cloud administrator, and a transparent consumption of these resources for the end user. With these two new additions, namely support for Microsoft Azure and IBM SoftLayer, OpenNebula is increasing the possibilities to build powerful, robust, cost and performance efficient cloud infrastructures across administrative domains and public cloud providers.

The OneFlow component also has been improved, specially OneGate, making sharing service information among VMs possible. Flows are now easier than ever to build and consume, since details like the virtual network the flow are going to use are defined later by the user, so the administrator doesn’t have to deal with all the possible combinations. Moreover, Virtual Networks underwent a thorough redesign. Definition of virtual networks are no longer restricted to the fixed and ranged model, but rather they can include any combination of ranges to accommodate any address distribution. Moreover, end users can now reserve a range or IP addresses for their own use at a later time.

Finally, several improvements are scattered across every other OpenNebula component: improvements in quotas management, multi boot available through Sunstone, availability of Windows contextualization packages, new raw device mapping datastore, better Ceph drivers, possibility to clone images across datastores …. ladies and gentlemen, you are in for a treat.

This is a stable release and so a recommended update. It incorporate important improvement since 4.6 and several bug fixes since 4.8 Beta. Be sure to check the compatibility and upgrade guides. We invite you to download it and to check the QuickStart guides, as well as to browse the documentation, which has also been properly updated. 

As usual OpenNebula releases are named after a Nebula. The Lemon Slice nebula (IC 3568)  is a planetary nebula that is 1.3 kiloparsecs (4500 ly) away from Earth in the constellation of Camelopardalis. It is a relatively young nebula and has a core diameter of only about 0.4 light years.

The new features for Cloud View and VDCAdmin View introduced in OpenNebula 4.8 were funded by Produban in the context of the Fund a Feature Program. The new feature that redefined virtual networks in OpenNebula 4.8 were funded by BlackBerry in the context of the Fund a Feature Program.

More information

OpenNebula Conf 2014: Program is determined – we are ready to rock the house

Hello dear folks!

We have created quite a lovely OpenNebula Conf line up for you and gave our very best to get the perfect balance of topics. Now everything is ready and we can proudly tell you that:

So now it is your turn to wallow in all the information here and register directly after that here for 3 days fully packed with enlightenment.

OpenNebula at CentOS Cologne Dojo

We are happy to announce that OpenNebula will be at the upcoming CentOS Dojo Cologne, Germany, which will take place on August 4th.

OpenNebula will be part of a very special event during the CentOS Dojo, a 2 hours tutorial about OpenNebula, CentOS and KVM. The tutorial will consist in a real world example OpenNebula deployment, where attendees will be able to follow and deploy their own cloud in their laptops. The only requirements is to have a laptop capable of virtualization, the latest VirtualBox installed, and the will to enjoy yourselves for a couple of hours!

If you are interested in deploying production-ready private or public clouds in minutes with fully functional working images, you should definitely drop by this event. It’s going to be fun and exciting!

Here at OpenNebula we really enjoy CentOS Dojos, it’s a wonderful occastion to meet with the local group of sysadmins, talk about experiences and to learn a lot about many things. Be sure to join this amazing event!

Registrations run through EventBrite. More info at the Dojo page.

loadays-centosdojo

Rentalia Experiences with OpenNebula and Bacula

imgRentalia

Hi, we at Rentalia.com have OpenNebula to meet our needs on virtualization, and we use Bacula to make backups of the vm’s disks. I’ll try to explain you how, let me tell you a bit of our environment first.

We have two OpenNebula environments, one’s for production and another for development. We use Puppet inside the vm’s so we don’t have to backup the files inside since they are given by Puppet. However, we have a few vm’s we would like to backup the disk image from, and since we are using Bacula along our system, we used Bacula to make this backups too.

First of all, we are using KVM and qcow2 drivers so we can make use of the “onevm disk-snapshot” capabilities, this way Bacula can invoke this command to make a hot snapshot of the disk. So the idea here  its to let Bacula make a hot snapshot of the target disk, store it, and remove the copy. This is an example job we use:

bacula

As you can see, we use two scripts, which are on the frontend. One script for making the hot snapshot and tell Bacula where it was created, and another for cleaning it after Bacula store it .
If you used Bacula before this is pretty straightforward, maybe the File directive it’s the weird thing here, we are getting the output from a script instead of using a file or dir name.

And this is the main script we use, Prebackup.sh. We give it the name of a vm and it makes a hot snaphot of the target disk, wait for it to finish, and then output the path of the snapshot. Maybe its too simple and doesn’t meet your needs, since there are some lack of logic to decide which is the disk to make the snapshot, we use 0 on onevm disk-snapshot because all of our machines have the image we care on slot 0 but you could change the scripts. For example, with some grep magic you could check if the disk you are going to copy its persistent or not, and its worth make a backup of it.

Once the script make the snapshot, and Bacula store it, Postbackup.sh script erase the copy we dont longer need.

There is some improvements that could be made on this method, the main script could be more intelligent to decide which image to backup and you have to keep some free space to make a room for the snapshot while doing the backup, but its some integration we made between Bacula and OpenNebula that works fine for us and maybe can help you too :)

OpenNebula Integrates with Azure to Build Hybrid Clouds

Today we are sharing exciting news about the expansion of the number of public clouds supported by OpenNebula to build hybrid cloud deployments. As a result of the collaboration between OpenNebula and Microsoft, a new set of plug-ins to support Microsoft Azure has been included in OpenNebula. This partnership has been announced today by Microsoft Open Technologies at the O’Reilly Open Source Convention (OSCON).

“With this set of plug-ins, IT pros and system integrations can use OpenNebula’s rich set of infrastructure management tools to manage cloud deployments across Microsoft’s private, public and hosted cloud platforms.”

The Beta version of  OpenNebula 4.8 bringing the new drivers was released today and is available for testing. The integration has been carried out using the Microsoft Azure SDK for Ruby, which interacts with the Azure REST API, enabling a complete control of the lifecycle of Virtual Machines in a transparent way within an OpenNebula cloud. Thanks to these new plug-ins, private resources can be easily supplemented with resources from Azure to meet fluctuating demands.

So far the only public cloud officially supported by OpenNebula to build hybrid cloud deployments was Amazon AWS. Supporting multiple public cloud providers opens the possibility of defining pre-determined schedule or performance-based policies for the execution of applications in different clouds, that can be fine tuned to achieve an optimal placement in terms of performance and cost. This new support also enables the ability to meet services constraints regarding special functionality offered by a subset of the supported public cloud providers, like for instance high availability.

Need more information? You are welcome to use the OpenNebula community instruments to ask around (for instance, the users mailing list is a good place to pose your questions).

As always, we value your feedback and contributions to this new feature!

OpenNebula 4.8 beta released!

The OpenNebula team is really happy to release the first beta for version 4.8 (4.7.80). In this version, alongside several fixes, we have been working on some new features:

  • Improvements to the Cloud View interface like OneFlow integration
  • New VDC admin view that matches the Cloud View.
  • New virtual network model that make its configuration and management more flexible with address ranges.
  • IP reservation.
  • Network interface default configuration
  • Quotas can now specify a value of 0 to disable certain objects for users or groups.
  • Logs now have the zone ID so its easier to parse in a centralized syslog configuration.
  • New datastore to use local block devices.
  • Inter datastore image clone.
  • Support for RBD format 2 in CEPH drivers
  • IO throttling for disk devices.
  • New hybrid drivers for Microsoft Azure and IBM Softlayer services.
  • OneGate can now be used to get information about all the VMs in a service.
  • OneFlow can wait until a VM phones home before starting the rest of VMs.
  • Network configuration in a flow can be specified per role.
  • User input on template instantiation for certain VM parameters.
  • Default view for a group in Sunstone.
  • Instantiate VMs on hold.
  • Boot order can be selected from Sunstone.

You can find more information about the new features in the release notes.

In this new release we also start supporting RHEL/CentOS 7. We encourage everyone that is using or planning to use this distributions to try the new packages and fill any bugs found in them.

We have also created new repositories for this release so its easier to install and your 4.6 installations don’t upgrade automatically to it.

You can download the packages from the software page or use the new repositories. Now is the time to try it and fill bugs so we can fix them before the final release.

This new release code name is “Lemon Slice“. From Wikipedia:

lemon_slice

The Lemon slice nebula, also known as IC 3568, is a planetary nebula that is 1.3 kiloparsecs (4500 ly) away from Earth in the constellation of Camelopardalis (just 7.5 degrees from Polaris). It is a relatively young nebula and has a core diameter of only about 0.4 light years. The Lemon slice nebula is one of the most simple nebulae known, with an almost perfectly spherical morphology. It appears very similar to a lemon, for which it is named. The core of the nebula does not have a distinctly visible structure in formation and is mostly composed of ionized helium. The central star is a very hot and bright asymptotic red giant, and can be seen as a red-orange hue in an amateur’s telescope. A faint halo of interstellar dust surrounds the nebula.

Thank you all for the input, patches and bug reports that made this release possible.