OpenNebula 5.8 beta (Edge) is the fifth major release of the OpenNebula 5 series. A significant effort has been applied in this release to enhance features introduced in 5.6 Blue Flash, while keeping an eye in implementing those features demanded most by the community. A major highlight of Edge is its focus to support computing on the Edge, bringing the processing power of VMs closer to the consumers to reduce latency. In this regards, Edge comes with the following major features:

  • Support for LXD. This enables low resource container orchestration. LXD containers are ideal to run on low consumption devices closer to the customers.
  • Automatic NIC selection. This enhancement of the OpenNebula scheduler will alleviate the burden of VM/container Template management in edge environments where the remote hosts can be potentially heterogeneous, with different network configurations.
  • Distributed Data Centers. This feature is key for the edge cloud. OpenNebula now offers the ability to use bare metal providers to build remote clusters in a breeze, without needing to change the workload nature. We are confident that this is a killer feature that sets OpenNebula apart from the direct competitors in the space.
  • Scalability improvements. Orchestrating an edge cloud will be demanding in terms of the number of VMs, containers and hypervisors to manage. OpenNebula 5.8 brings to the table a myriad of improvements to the monitoring, pool management and GUI, to deliver a smooth user experience in large scale environments.

This OpenNebula release is named after the edges of nebulas. Nebulas are diffuse objects, and their edges can be considered vacuum. However, they are very thick, so they appear to be dense. This is the aim of OpenNebula 5.8, to provide computing power on a wide geographic surface to offer services closer to customers, building a cloud managed from a single portal over very thin infrastructure. There’s an Edge Nebula on the Freelancer videogame.

The OpenNebula team is now transitioning to “bug-fixing mode”. Note that this is a beta release aimed at testers and developers to try the new features, and send a more than welcomed feedback for the final release. Also note that being a beta, there is no migration path from the previous stable version (5.6.1) nor a migration path to the final stable version (5.8.0). A list of open issues can be found in the GitHub development portal.

Relevant Links

Join us in Frankfurt, Germany for our next OpenNebula TechDay

Both Interactive Network and EuroCloud Germany will be hosting our next OpenNebula TechDay, in Frankfurt, Germany on February 14, 2019.

We are starting off the year, heads down and focused on getting OpenNebula v.5.8 ready for release.  A beta-release is not far away now, and what better way to get first-hand details about new capabilities?!  Join us, together with Interactive Network and EuroCloud Germany, for our FREE day-long seminar where we will provide hands-on training, share use cases and insights on experiences, and have the opportunity to discuss “What’s New” in OpenNebula.

Check the following links for registration and agenda information:


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OpenNebula v.5.8 is close…

We are launching a “Call for Translations” as we prepare the release of OpenNebula v.5.8.  Any help that you can provide in helping to translate for our Sunstone GUI would be of enormous value – and it is very easy to do!

You can translate “one string at a time”.

Existing translations can be updated and new translations submitted through our project site at Transifex:

https://www.transifex.com/opennebula/one/

The “Call for Translations” will end on January 28, 2019.  And translated languages reaching a good level of completion will be included in the official v.5.8 release.

We appreciate your collaboration!!

Closing out 2018…and welcoming in 2019!!

2018 has been another exciting year for OpenNebula. It has brought continued developments and advancements in the OpenNebula product capabilities. At the same time, we’ve seen a fervor and a steady commitment by the User Community which continues to bring unmatched value. At OpenNebula Systems, we have our sights set on continued improvement for 2019, and we are excited about several promising, emerging developments. But again, one of the key dynamics of the project is that we wouldn’t be able to grow without you.

For that reason, one of the recent developments in the community has been our request for your participation in our 2018 User Survey.  This is a simple vehicle to allow us to learn about the use cases, platforms, and overarching technical needs of the OpenNebula User Community.  We look to remain in synch with your needs, and to develop alongside with you. Fill it out, and share your thoughts!

Speaking of developments…

Among the various version releases this year, we released version 5.6 “Blue Flash” with a huge set of improvements both at the core level, as well as for vCenter integration. And from there, we have jumped right into focused development on the upcoming version 5.8.  In it, we have been working on many different features – a long-awaited support for LXD containers, being one of them.

2018 has seen a certain dedicated focus on the emerging developments surrounding Edge Computing, and while we have been working closely with customers and partners, learning the details of evolving use cases, we have also made developments around integrations with OpenNebula along “the edge”.  Earlier this year, we released an initial prototype of “oneProvision”, allowing users to provision and deploy bare-metal resources directly within an OpenNebula cluster.  Upcoming development of oneProvision will include being able to deploy not only one host, but a cluster of hosts.  At the same time, we partnered with Packet to demonstrate our continued focus in bringing capabilities to the edge.

Recent releases of new capabilities like miniONE and VirtualNetwork Scheduler, and the Image Converter to/from VMDK and QCOW2 all demonstrate our driven effort to making OpenNebula the easiest-to-use platform out there.

The “Calendar of Events”

In 2018, we held several OpenNebula TechDay events throughout Europe – in Sofia hosted by StorPool, in Barcelona hosted by CSUC, and in Frankfurt hosted by LINBIT – and in the US – in Santa Clara, CA hosted by Hitachi Vantara and in Cambridge, MA hosted by OpenNebula Systems.  We also held our OpenNebulaConf in Amsterdam.  We thank our sponsors and hosts for collaborating to put these events together.

Events schedule in 2019

The lineup for OpenNebula TechDays for this coming year will tentatively be in the following locations, with dates and details to be determined:

  • Frankfurt
  • Barcelona
  • Vienna
  • Sofia
  • Boston

And plan to attend our 2019 OpenNebulaConf in Barcelona on October 21-22, 2019.

Great support from the Community

Lastly, as we continuously try to make clear, the OpenNebula project would not have the vitality nor the reach it has if it weren’t for our dedicated User Community.  We’ve seen a continued growth of OpenNebula Champions.  Throughout the year, users have taken the time to publish tutorials like these from Pandora FMSVirtuozzo 7, and CSUC.  Our OpenNebula Blog has been used by many from the Community to publish share insight and experiences. This year, we also created our Partner Ecosystem, another instrument to show and share integrations between ONE and other great technologies.

This has been an exciting year for OpenNebula! We give you our utmost thanks, and we look forward to our collaboration going into 2019!!

Stay Connected!

Our newsletter contains the highlights of the OpenNebula project and its Community throughout the month.

Technology

Several important items and functionalities have been worked on or released this month, which are definitely worth mentioning:

  • We released the powerful, yet simple tool called “miniONE“.  With miniOne, you can now stand up a complete OpenNebula environment on a single host with just one command.  And it takes no longer than a few minutes.  Check out the detailed miniONE blog post.
  • We have released a new appliance onto the OpenNebula Marketplace with a pre-installed WordPress 5.0 service.  Take a look at the quick walk-through on the forum post and check it out!
  • We have been firmly focused on our testing and validation of the LXD container support, along with vCenter driver updates, and we are getting very close to releasing a beta version for OpenNebula 5.8.  Keep your eyes peeled!

Community

As the holiday season approaches, and we coast into the new year, we give a big thanks to the User Community for your continued support and enthusiasm in pushing OpenNebula forward, and for sharing your experiences and insight.

Outreach

And as we look toward the new year, we have been working fervently on the OpenNebula plan for 2019:

  • We sent out our 2018 User Survey with the hopes of getting useful insight into your needs and suggested areas of focus. Your feedback is extremely valuable, so we urge you to fill it out, if you haven’t already.  (It takes 5 minutes, max).
  • We will soon be wrapping up our OpenNebula TechDay schedule for 2019. We sent out a Call for Hosts, and are working on finalizing our schedule.  There’s still time to submit your request to host a TechDay of your own.

We wish you all a wonderful holiday season, and look forward to ringing in the new year together!

Best wishes, and Stay Connected!

The Scientific IT Services (SIS) of ETH Zurich offers  scientific computing, research data management and analysis support, as well as software engineering expertise to ETH researchers.

To support the personalized health research community, the SIS built and actively develops further “Leonhard Med”: a secure and powerful high-performance platform designed for computing, storage, management, interoperability and controlled sharing of confidential research data (e.g., biomedical patient data). Leonhard Med is operated by the Scientific IT Services (SIS) of ETH Zurich and it is part of the emerging BioMedIT national network whose role is to provide secure and interoperable data and computing infrastructures for research projects in the Swiss personalized health programs

While being in production use since beginning of 2018, Leonhard Med must be constantly developed further to keep up with new and changing requirements within a rapidly, evolving scientific environment. For example, our customers needed additional services that could not be hosted on a regular HPC infrastructure (e.g., databases, terminal servers, webapps or data management applications). This brought us to the idea of providing a cloud solution. We had some previous experience running vCloud Director (VMware) and we also had a close look to OpenStack but both came with a high price tag either in terms of license costs or manpower. Luckily one of our consultants introduced OpenNebula to us and after a few weeks of testing we fell in love with it. It met all our requirements and we found it quite intuitive and easy to maintain and support. We were actually looking for a lightweight but powerful product that is easy to maintain with few IT personnel resources and on the other hand we were aware of the challenges lying ahead of us when integrating OpenNebula into the secure environment of Leonhard Med.

We began deploying and integrating OpenNebula almost 4 months ago, using 2 physical hosts from the cluster (new hardware) and set-up the OpenNebula and 2x KVM nodes on them. We now have a fully functional and productive installation ready to serve our consumer needs and we achieved this with only a few sysadmins working on the project part time time over the four months. Our private cloud running OpenNebula sits in a restricted zone without Internet access. The access is done via proxy servers using 2 factor authentication and Sunstone is only reachable via socks proxy. For reproducibility purposes, the installation and all processes running inside the cloud has been automated with Ansible.

Challenges: We did face a couple of challenges during installation and later on during the upgrade to v5.6. For example, we had to search for a couple of ruby gems, built rpms and move them into our secured environment. These were mostly related to our network security restrictions. Nevertheless, as a “nice to have” I’d include all dependencies required during installation or upgrade within OpenNebula’s repository for RH/CentOS platforms.