OpenNebula 1.4.0 released

The OpenNebula team is happy to announce that we have reached a stable state for the new 1.4 series of the OpenNebula Toolkit. During these months we have been working on new features that we hope will be helpful to manage your infrastructure. Downloads are available as source code as previous version but we also have created binary packages for RedHat/CentOS, Ubuntu, openSUSE and Fedora.

We want to thank the people actively using beta versions that provided us feedback to polish features and get rid of bugs before releasing this stable version.


Highlights of OpenNebula 1.4 are…

  • EC2 Query API interface for building OpenNebula-based clouds
  • OCCI interface for building OpenNebula-based clouds
  • Support for the VMware Hypervisor family
  • Multiple user support and access-right control for Virtual Machines and Virtual Networks
  • Advance contextualization support to integrate VM packs and implement multi-component services
  • Easy integration with your data-center services and procedures with a new hook system
  • Support block devices as VM images.
  • Support for LVM storage
  • Many bug fixes, and scalability and performance improvements in several components of the OpenNebula system
  • A whole new set of documentation pages, guides and examples

Quick Links

The OpenNebula Team!

OpenNebula Cloud Announcement

The OpenNebula Team is proud to announce the dawn of the OpenNebula Cloud. Although this can be shortened to ONE Cloud, it is in fact two, although both of them are accesible using two interfaces: OCCI and EC2.

  • Dummy cloud. This cloud offers an interface to an OpenNebula instance configured using dummy drivers. This means that it will offer a seemingly infinite capacity to run VMs, but it actually won’t ever run any VM instance. This ‘dummy’ cloud is offered to test the OCCI and EC2 inte rfaces
  • Real cloud. The OpenNebula instance that supports this clouds has access to physical server, and will offer the possibility of configure virtual networks, launching real VMs and access them using public IPs. This ‘real’ cloud VMs will have a limited capacity and is not meant to provide VMs on demand for personal uses, but rather to test OpenNebula cloud functionality.

The aim of these clouds is to allow for interface testing and foster the creation of an ecosystem built on top of OpenNebula clouds.

More information on configuration of the clients and usage of the two clouds can be found here.

onecloud

Tino Vázquez

OpenNebula 1.4 Beta 2, Released!

The OpenNebula team is happy to announce the second beta release of OpenNebula 1.4. This Beta 2 is aimed at testers, community members and cloud enthusiasts in order to identify bugs and regressions, so that 1.4 can fully replace OpenNebula 1.2 deployments.

After nearly three months has passed since the feature freeze for OpenNebula 1.4, the OpenNebula team has been working hard on polishing the new features, and solving bugs. While there could be some issues that need to be fixed before the stable release, OpenNebula 1.4 beta 2 shapes up nicely and brings an important number of improvements and innovations in Cloud computing.

Highlights of OpenNebula 1.4 are…

  • EC2 Query API interface for building OpenNebula-based clouds
  • OCCI interface for building OpenNebula-based clouds
  • Support for the VMware Hypervisor family
  • Multiple user support and access-right control for Virtual Machines and Virtual Networks
  • Advance contextualization support to integrate VM packs and implement multi-component services
  • Easy integration with your data-center services and procedures with a new hook system
  • Support block devices as VM images.
  • Many bug fixes, and scalability and performance improvements in several components of the OpenNebula system
  • A whole new set of documentation pages, guides and examples

Quick Links

The OpenNebula Team!

OpenNebula at CCA09

The innovations provided by the OpenNebula open-source toolkit for cloud computing have been presented at CCA09 (Cloud Computing and its Application 2009) in Chicago. The presentation includes a description of the novel functionality  that has been incorporated into release 1.4 to address the technology challenges from the business use cases in the RESERVOIR project, and the ecosystem that is evolving around the OpenNebula open-source community.

IMGP3268-1

Ignacio Martin Llorente

OpenNebula Implements the OGF Open Cloud Computing Interface Draft Specification

Last Friday, the OpenNebula project announced the implementation of the OGF OCCI draft specification.  The release, that will be part of OpenNebula 1.4,  includes a server implementation, clients command for using the service and enabling access to the full functionality of the OCCI interface, and several supporting documents. The last version of this open source toolkit for cloud computing, available for download in beta release, also brings libvirt, EC2 Query API, and a powerful CLI, and all of them can be used on the same OpenNebula instance, so users can use their favorite interface. In fact, OpenNebula brings support to develop other Cloud interfaces. Moreover all those interfaces can be used on any of the virtualization technologies supported, Xen, KVM and VMware.

The Open Grid Forum (OGF) Open Cloud Computing Interface  (OCCI) Working Group was officially launched in April 2009 to deliver an interface specification for managing cloud infrastructure services, also known as Infrastructure as a Service or IaaS. This specification is being driven by the requirements in several use cases. The document Requirements and Use Cases for a Cloud API records the needs of IaaS Cloud computing managers and administrators in the form of Use Cases.

In the last days there has been an intensive discussion on the topic of IaaS Cloud interfaces. There are now three main players in the arena, the Amazon EC2 API, supported by the most well-known cloud computing provider, the VMware vCloud API, supported by the leader in virtualization and submitted to DMTF, and the OGF OCCI API, being defined by an open community in the Open Grid Forum. OpenNebula now implements two of them, EC2 and OCCI, and there is interest in the OpenNebula community in implementing the third interface, vCloud (after all, OpenNebula 1.4 supports VMware). However, the interest of OpenNebula as open-source community is not only to implement an interface specification controlled by a company, but also to contribute to its definition by providing feedback and playing an active role in subsequent versions. In this sense, OCCI-WG is the only open standard sanctioned by a standards body.

While some existing open-source technologies are just implementations of commercial products and interfaces, others open-source technologies such as OpenNebula, are powerful tools for innovation. A Cloud technology should not only be the implementation of an interface, standardized or not. OpenNebula, as technology being developed in the context of RESERVOIR European flagship project in cloud computing, provides many unique capabilities for the scalable and efficient management of the data center infrastructure. Those are the real differentiation in the cloud and virtualization market.

Ignacio Martin Llorente

Haizea 1.0 Beta 1 now available

A new version of the Haizea Lease Manager was released a few days ago and is available for download at http://haizea.cs.uchicago.edu/

Haizea can be used as a drop-in replacement for OpenNebula‘s scheduling daemon, providing OpenNebula with more advanced scheduling capabilities such as advance reservations and queueing of requests when there are no resources available. The latest version of Haizea is the first of two betas on the road to Haizea 1.0. This beta includes several major new features:

  • Support for pluggable scheduling policies: Whereas previous versions of Haizea used hardcoded scheduling policies (e.g., to determine whether a lease could be accepted, whether it should be preempted, etc.), this version allows users to choose between different policies, or to write their own custom policies that they can “plug into” Haizea. Writing a custom policy only requires writing a Python module implementing a set of methods described in the Haizea documentation.
  • Support for heterogeneous resources and arbitrary resource types: Previous versions of Haizea required that each lease be composed of homogeneous nodes (i.e., all the VMs in a lease had to request the same amount of resources), and only supported five resource types (CPU, Memory, Disk, Inbound network and Outbound network). This version supports leases with heterogeneous resource requirements and allows users to define arbitrary resource types that can then be requested by leases.
  • New LWF (Lease Workload Format): Leases are now described using a new XML format that, unlike the previous LWF, supports specification of heterogeneous nodes and arbitrary resource types.
  • OpenNebula 1.4 support: The OpenNebula enactment module has been updated to support OpenNebula 1.4. The new enactment module uses OpenNebula’s XML-RPC API, instead of accessing the OpenNebula database directly.
  • More unit tests: Besides the existing trace-based unit tests (which run simple tracefiles with Haizea), new unit tests have been written to make sure that Haizea’s core data structures, like the slot table and the resource mapper, are working correctly.
  • Pydoc documentation: Most of Haizea’s modules are now fully documented using Pydoc. A browsable HTML version is provided on the Haizea website for developers who want to write their own custom policies.
  • New project management site: The PhoenixForge site where Haizea is hosted has recently migrated to a Redmine site (from the previous Trac-based Dr.Project site). This new site provides a much better web interface and several other project management features.

Please note that the current version is still a beta, and not suitable for use in production environments. Its main purpose is to get feedback from the community so, if you encounter any bugs or there’s any particular feature you’re interested in, please don’t hesitate to let us know on the Haizea mailing list: https://mailman.cs.uchicago.edu/mailman/listinfo/haizea

OpenNebula Tarantula Stable version 1.2.1

The OpenNebula team is pleased to announce a new Stable version (1.2.1) of the OpenNebula Tarantula (1.2.x) series that is available for download under the terms of the Apache License, Version 2.0. This maintenance release is intended to fix bugs that were either fixed in the development version (1.3.x) or just relevant to the 1.2 release. It aims to provide an even more robust, reliable and scalable version of OpenNebula for efficient management of virtual infrastructures, to be used in production environments.

Relevant Links

The OpenNebula Team

OpenNebula Supports the Amazon EC2 Query API on VMware-based Cloud Infrastructures

This is the first post I am writing to illustrate the main novelties of the new version of the OpenNebula Virtual Infrastructure Manager. OpenNebula is an open-source toolkit for building Public, Private and Hybrid Cloud infrastructures based on Xen, KVM and VMware virtualization platforms. OpenNebula v1.4 is available in beta release, incorporating bleeding edge technologies and innovations in many areas of virtual infrastructure management and Cloud Computing.

While previous versions concentrated on functionality for Private and Hybrid Cloud computing, this new version incorporates a new service to expose Cloud interfaces to Private or Hybrid Cloud deployments, so providing partners or external users with access to the private infrastructure, for example to sell  overcapacity. The new version brings a new framework to easily develop Cloud interfaces, and implements as example a subset of the Amazon EC2 Query API. The OpenNebula EC2 Query is a web service that enables users to launch and manage virtual machines in an OpenNebula installation through the Amazon EC2 Query Interface. In this way, besides the Openebula CLI or the new libvirt interface, users can use any EC2 Query tool or utility to access your Private Cloud.

The OpenNebula team is also developing the RESERVOIR Cloud interface and is planning to develop the OGF OCCI API. Moreover, as it is stated in its Ecosystem page, the team will also collaborate with IaaS Cloud providers interested in an open-source implementation of their Cloud interface to foster adoption of their Cloud services.

Other new interesting feature is the support for VMware. The VMware Infrastructure API provides a complete set of language-neutral interfaces to the VMware virtual infrastructure management framework. By targeting the VMware Infrastructure API, the OpenNebula VMware adaptors are able to manage various flavors of VMware hypervisors: ESXi, ESX and VMware Server.

The combination of both innovations allows the creation of a Cloud infrastructure based on VMware that can be interfaced using Amazon EC2 Query API. I will cover more unique features and capabilities in upcoming posts.

Ignacio Martín Llorente

OpenNebula 1.4 Beta 1 codename Hourglass out for testing!

The OpenNebula team is proud to announce the availability of OpenNebula 1.4 Beta1 Hourglass (1.3.80), this is the first preview of next stable release of the OpenNebula Virtual Infrastructure Manager.

OpenNebula focuses on incorporating bleeding edge technologies and innovations in many areas of virtual infrastructure management and Cloud Computing. OpenNebula 1.4 aims to be the swiss-army knife of Cloud Computing, letting you deploy any type of Cloud. The OpenNebula team has been set now to bug fixing mode to provide a robust and stable OpenNebula 1.4.0 to your data centers.

Please note that OpenNebula 1.4 Beta 1 is not suitable for production settings. Its sole purpose is gathering feedback and testing new exciting features…

Highlights of OpenNebula 1.4 are..

  • EC2 Query API interface on top of OpenNebula, so you can turn your OpenNebula installation in a Public Cloud
  • Support for the VMware Hypervisor family
  • Multiple user support and access-right control for Virtual Machines and Virtual Networks
  • Advance contextualization support to integrate VM packs and implement multi-component services
  • A new OpenNebula Cloud API (OCA) to easily develop any cloud interface or cloud application
  • Easy integration with your data-center services and procedures with a new hook system
  • Many bug fixes, and scalability and performance improvements in several components of the OpenNebula system
  • A whole new set of documentation pages, guides and examples

The OpenNebula Team!

REFERENCES:

Libvirt 0.6.5 released… including a OpenNebula driver

Libvirt version 0.6.5 was released last week with a number of bug fixes and new features. The complete list of changes can be viewed at the libvirt web site. This new release includes an OpenNebula driver that provides a libvirt interface to an OpenNebula cluster.

What is it? OpenNebula is a Virtual Infrastructure Manager that controls Virtual Machines (VM) in a pool of distributed resources by orchestrating network, storage and virtualization technologies. The OpenNebula driver lets you manage your private cloud using a standard libvirt interface, including the API as well as the related tools (e.g. virsh) and VM description files.

Why a libvirt interface for your private cloud? Libvirt is evolving into a very rich and widely used interface to manage the virtualization capabilities of a server, including virtual network, storage and domain management. So, libvirt can be a very effective administration interface for a private cloud exposing a complete set of VM and physical node operations. In this way, libvirt + OpenNebula provides a powerful abstraction for your private cloud. More on interfaces for Private Clouds in this post…

Ruben S. Montero