OpenNebula Addons: A New Way to Contribute

The OpenNebula Project is happy to announce OpenNebula Addons, a new way to contribute to OpenNebula!. An OpenNebula Addon is an open source, production-ready software extension designed to extend the functionality of OpenNebula, but can not be included in OpenNebula distributions because of license conflicts.  OpenNebula is released under Apache 2.0 license.

The OpenNebula project does endorse these extensions and supports them through the user mailing list. Moreover, the project ensures its full compatibility with current and upcoming releases of OpenNebula. This will allow us to offer new state-of-the-art functionality from companies and organizations that for any reason can not release the software under the Apache license. Participation in OpenNebula Addons requires the contributors to allocate resources to maintain, improve and support the Addon.

In few hours we are announcing the first contributions to OpenNebula Addons, we will keep you updated, so stay tuned!

The OpenNebula Project

OpenNebula in RESERVOIR Cloud Stack Release

RESERVOIR, flagship of European projects in cloud computing technology coordinated by IBM, has just announced the release of its cloud stack featuring Claudia Service Manager (Telefonica’s tool for automatic management of service scalability), OpenNebula Cloud Toolkit and security services for cloud federation. The RESERVOIR Cloud Stack supports the delivery of services on an on-demand basis, across countries, at competitive costs and without requiring a large capital investment in infrastructure. RESERVOIR enables the migration of resources across distributed administrative domains, maximizing resource exploitation, and minimizing costs to the end-user with guaranteed quality of service.  RESERVOIR defines an open federated infrastructure cloud architecture and delivers a framework of open source components you can download from the RESERVOIR website and integrate to build your own open source cloud infrastructure.

Ignacio M. Llorente

OpenNebula 2.0 RC1, ready for testing!

Today, the OpenNebula team has released a candidate (RC) of what is to become OpenNebula 2.0. This means that the team is now officially in bug fixing mode, and the repository has been set to feature freeze. Please also note that OpenNebula 2.0 RC 1 is targeted at testers and is not recommended for production environments.

With respect to the previous Beta Release (1.9.80), OpenNebula 2.0 RC1 solves most of the bugs identified during the testing phase and features a new set of decoupled actions from the drivers. This means that with OpenNebula 2.0 it is even easier to tune the operations performed upon specific actions (e.g. shutdown, create, cancel). Also this reduces the number of connections to the cluster nodes so you should also experiment performance improvements in some areas.

We really appreciate the work of the community testing the previous release and giving feedback about issues and bugs. Thank you for helping making a better OpenNebula 2.0!

The OpenNebula Team.

Relevant Links

OpenNebula in EU Initiative to Build a Multi-site Cloud

BonFIRE is a 8,5-million-Euro EU-funded initiative (EU grant agreement 257386) funded by the 7th FWP (Seventh Framework Programme) under the Future Internet Experimental Facility and Experimentally-driven Research (ICT-2009.1.6) area, aimed at designing, building and operating a multi-site cloud facility to support applications, services and systems research targeting the Internet of Services community within the Future Internet.

BonFIRE will operate a Cloud facility based on an Infrastructure as a Service delivery model with guidelines, policies and best practices for experimentation. BonFIRE will adopt a federated multi-platform approach providing interconnection and interoperation between novel service and networking testbeds. The platform will offer advanced services and tools for services research including cloud federation, virtual machine management, service modelling, service lifecycle management, service level agreements, quality of service monitoring and analytics.

The BonFIRE project brings together a consortium of world leading industrial and academic organisations in cloud computing to deliver a robust, reliable and sustainable facility for large scale experimentally-driven cloud research. Multinational companies (ATOS, HP, SAP), renowned universities and super computing centres (DSA-Research@UCM, EPCC, HLRS Stuttgart, IBBT, TUB), research centres (IT Innovation, FhG Fokus, INRIA, i2CAT) and technology analysts (451 Group) provide the complimentary expertise and infrastructure resources necessary to accelerate the research and development within the Internet of Services community.

OpenNebula will provide the EU FP7 project with a powerful technoloy to build IaaS clouds supporting the cloud management functionality, the integration capabilities and the scalability and reliability to run large-scale experiments for future internet research. This news consolidates OpenNebula’s position at the cutting edge of cloud computing technology worldwide, following two recent announcements of its participation in the EU’s StratusLab project, aimed at bringing cloud and virtualization to grid computing, and its participation in the EU’s 4CaaSt project, aimed at building the PaaS cloud of the future.

OpenNebula is the leading and most advanced framework for cloud computing, with excellent performance and scalability to manage tens of thousands of VMs. OpenNebula is the result of many years of research and development in efficient and scalable management of virtual machines on large-scale distributed infrastructures. Its innovative features have been developed to address the requirements of business use cases from leading companies in the context of flagship European projects in cloud computing. OpenNebula is being used as an open platform for innovation in several international projects to research the challenges that arise in cloud management, and also as production-ready tool in both academia and industry to manage clouds.

Ignacio M. Llorente

C12G Announces Free Evaluation – Low-cost Entry Programs

C12G Labs has just announced new Support Services Programs to entry into private cloud computing for organizations that want, firstly, to evaluate the suitability and performance of OpenNebula Enterprise Edition in their environments and, secondly, to have a production-ready cloud up and running quickly and with a minimal upfront investment. More details at C12G’s Blog.

C12G is the primary private sponsor for the OpenNebula open-source Project, providing a variety of resources, including development, maintenance and infrastructure.

C12G Labs

Cloud Interoperability and Portability with OpenNebula

OpenNebula 2.0 emphasizes interoperability and portability, providing cloud users and administrators with choice across most popular cloud interfaces, hypervisors and public clouds for hybrid cloud computing deployments, and with a flexible software that can be installed in any hardware and software combination. The functionality provided by the new version of OpenNebula and the components in its quickly growing ecosystem enable:

Because two data centers are not the same, building a cloud computing infrastructure requires the integration and orchestration of the underlying existing IT systems, services and processes. OpenNebula enables interoperability and portability, recognizing that our users have data-centers composed of different hardware and software components for security, virtualization, storage, and networking. Its open, architecture, interfaces and components provide the flexibility and extensibility that many enterprise IT shops need for internal cloud adoption. You only have to chose the right design and configuration in your Cloud architecture depending on your existing IT architecture and the execution requirements of your service workload.

Ignacio M. Llorente

OpenNebula in EU Initiative for PaaS Cloud of the Future

4CaaSt is a 15-million-Euro EU-funded initiative (EU grant agreement 258862) funded by the 7th FWP (Seventh Framework Programme) under the Internet of Services, Software & virtualisation (ICT-2009.1.2) area, aimed at creating an advanced PaaS Cloud platform which supports the optimized and elastic hosting of Internet-scale multi-tier applications. 4CaaSt embeds all the necessary features, easing programming of rich applications and enabling the creation of a true business ecosystem where applications coming from different providers can be tailored to different users, mashed up and traded together.

The 4CaaSt project brings together a consortium of Europe’s leading experts in cloud computing, including UPM, 2nd Quadrant Limited, BonitaSoft, Bull SAS, Telefónica Investigación y Desarrollo, Ericsson GMBH, FlexiScale, France Telecom, Universitat St Gallen, ICCS/NTUA, Nokia Siemens Networks, SAP AG, Telecom Italia, UCM (DSA-Research), Universitaet Stuutgart, UvT-EISS, and ZIB. OpenNebula will provide the EU FP7 project with a powerful technoloy to build IaaS clouds supporting automatic scaling of resources to run the business use-case scenarios in real world conditions.  This news consolidates OpenNebula’s position at the cutting edge of cloud computing technology worldwide, following an announcement two months ago of its adoption in the EU’s StratusLab project, aimed at bringing cloud and virtualization to grid computing.

OpenNebula is the leading and most advanced framework for cloud computing, with excellent performance and scalability to manage tens of thousands of VMs. OpenNebula is the result of many years of research and development in efficient and scalable management of virtual machines on large-scale distributed infrastructures. Its innovative features have been developed to address the requirements of business use cases from leading companies in the context of flagship European projects in cloud computing. OpenNebula is being used as an open platform for innovation in several international projects to research the challenges that arise in cloud management, and also as production-ready tool in both academia and industry to manage clouds.

OpenNebula 2.0 Beta1 out for testing!

The OpenNebula team has released the first beta version of what is to become OpenNebula 2.0 next September. OpenNebula 2.0 Beta 1 is targeted at testers and users that would like to peep at what’s coming to their clouds!. OpenNebula 2.0 beta includes a significant amount of changes and new features in many areas, bringing the most flexible, scalable and feature rich Cloud Toolkit to the Free Software community. OpenNebula 2.0 is the result of a close collaboration with our user community to address their scalability, flexibility and security requirements in large-scale production systems.

This new release will break compatibility with OpenNebula 1.4 (at DB and API levels), therefore we’ve decided to follow a larger release cycle to make a smooth transition period, and also to stabilize API‘s and internal data models for the new components.

What is new in OpenNebula 2.0 Beta1

  • Image Repository. The Image Repository allows users to easily specify disk images from a catalog without worrying about low-level disk configuration attributes or block device mapping. Also, image access control is applied to the images registered in the repository, hence simplifying multi-user environments and image sharing. The traditional method of specifying VM disks is also fully supported. More info…
  • MySQL support. OpenNebula can work now with MySQL or Sqlite DBs backends. The new MySQL support brings important performance and scalability improvements compared to the Sqlite implementation. MySQL is the recommended option for large-scale clouds. More info…
  • Scalability Improvements. Several components of OpenNebula have been tuned to work with tens of thousands of VMs, including the redesign of the scheduler and adjustments to the monitoring modules.
  • Cluster support. Physical hosts can now be grouped in logical clusters, so after a cluster is defined it can be then used to set the placement of a VM. More info…
  • Authorization & Authentication Drivers. The authorization and authentication processes in OpenNebula have been totally redesigned. Now they can be handled natively by the OpenNebula core, offering the same functionality as OpenNebula 1.4. Alternatively, the A&A processes can be handled by an external component that can be integrated with any A&A system or user maps (e.g. LDAP, Kerberos…). As an example OpenNebula 2.0 features a quota based authorization module and user authentication based on RSA keys. More info…
  • Virtual Networking Improvements. OpenNebula 2.0 lets you define generic attributes associated to a a Virtual Network (e.g. gateway, dns servers…) that can then be included in the context of a VM. This will let you easily configure VMs with multiple NICs. Additionally Virtual Networks can now be defined as public, and thus shared among multiple users.
  • Improved EC2 support. The EC2 Query server can now be used with the EC2 ecosystem, supported third party applications include ElasticFox or EucaTools. More info…
  • Java Bindings for the OpenNebula Cloud API (OCA) OpenNebula 2.0 includes JAVA bindings that wraps the XMLRPC interface methods exposed by the core. More info…

Relevant Links


OpenNebula at the D-Grid Resource Center Ruhr

The D-Grid Resource Center Ruhr (DGRZR) was established in 2008 at Dortmund University of Technology as part of the German Grid initiative D-Grid. In contrast to other resources, DGRZR used virtualization technologies from the start and still runs all Grid middleware, batch system and management services in virtual machines. In 2010, DGRZR was extended by the installation of OpenNebula as its Compute Cloud middleware to manage our virtual machines as a private cloud.

At present, the resource center is not only a production site of D-Grid, but also of NGI-DE (National Grid Initiative-Deutschland). Additionally it will be used as prototype for the integration of an EC2-compatible Compute Cloud middleware as a new pillar in the D-Grid software stack. After successful integration, DGRZR will act as public cloud resource and allow D-Grid members to deploy their virtual appliances.
The following diagram summarizes the DGRZR architecture:

OpenNebula at D-Grid Resource Center Ruhr

OpenNebula at D-Grid Resource Center Ruhr

Physical resources:

DGRZR consists of 256 HP blade servers with eight CPU cores (2048 cores in total) and 16 Gigabyte RAM each. The disk space per server is about 150 Gigabytes. 50% of this space is reserved for virtual machine images. The operating system on the physical servers is SUSE Enterprise Linux (SLES) 10 Service Pack 3 and will be changed to SLES 11 in the near future. We provide our D-Grid users with roughly 100 terabytes of central storage, mainly for home directories, experiment software and for the dCache Grid Storage Element. In 2009, the mass storage was upgraded by adding 25 terabyte of HP Scalable File Share 3.1 (a Lustre-like file system) and is currently migrated to version 3.2. 250 of the  256 blade servers will typically be running virtual worker nodes. The remaining servers run virtual machines for  the Grid middleware services (gLite, Globus Toolkit and UNICORE), the batch system server, and other management services.

Networking:

The network configuration of the resource center is static and assumes a fixed mapping from the MAC of the virtual machine to its public IP address. For each available node type (worker nodes, Grid middleware services and management services) a separate virtual LAN exists and DNS names for the possible leases have been setup in advance in the central DNS servers of the university.

Image repository and distribution:

The repository consists of images for the worker nodes based on Scientific Linux 4.8 and 5.4, UNICORE and also Globus Toolkit services. We will soon be working on creating of images for the gLite services.

The master images that are cloned to the physical servers are located on a NFS server and are kept up to date manually. The initial creation of such images (including installation and configuration of Grid services) is currently done manually, but will be replaced in near future by automated workflows. The distribution of those images to the physical servers happens on demand and uses the OpenNebula SSH transfer mechanism. Currently we have no need for pre-staging virtual machine images to the physical servers, but we may add this using scp-wave.

The migration of virtual machines has been tested in conjunction with SFS 3.1, but production usage has been postponed until the completion of the file system upgrade.

OpenNebula:

The version currently used is an OpenNebula  1.4 GIT snapshot from March 2010. Due to some problems of SLES10 with Xen (e. g. “tap:aio” not really working) modifications to the snapshot were made. In addition to this, we setup the OpenNebula Management Console and use it as a graphical user interface.

The SQLite3 database back-end performs well for the limited number of virtual machines we are running, but with the upgrade to OpenNebula 1.6 we will migrate to a MySQL back-end to prepare for an extension of our cloud to other clusters. Using Haizea as lease manager seems out of scope at the moment. With the upcoming integration of this resource as D-Grid IaaS resource, scheduler features like advanced reservations are mandatory.

Stefan Freitag (Robotics Research Institute, TU Dortmund)
Florian Feldhaus (ITMC, TU Dortmund)

OpenNebula Technology Days – Wrap Up

The first edition of the OpenNebula Technology Days, kindly hosted by C12G Labs, took place this week in Madrid. It featured an extensive tutorial on how to install, configure and use OpenNebula to build Private, Hybrid and Public clouds. It included a last session covering advanced topics such as how to extend OpenNebula easily due to its flexible architecture, isolating your virtual networks using ebtables, etc.

The event was attended by several partners that actively use OpenNebula as their core toolkit to build clouds. Attendees included people from the following organizations: ATOS, Stuttgart University, IBBT, I2CAT, CNRS, TCD, GRNET, SIXSQ, Telefonica I+D, SURFNET, ESA, Franunhofer FOKUS, NICE, EPCC and IT Innovation. All in all, it turned out to be a successful and very formative event.

More information on the agenda and links to the slides used in the OpenNebula Technology Days can be found here.

Tino Vázquez