This post is about a simple tool called miniONE, which allows you to easily install OpenNebula on a single host from the freshly deployed system to the ready-to-use OpenNebula installation just by a single command.

Let’s say that you just want to check out how OpenNebula looks like when starting evaluation or you want to see if something particular is done in v5.6. This might be the case when you can use miniONE.

So, just get it:

$ wget https://github.com/OpenNebula/minione/raw/v5.6.0/minione

and run it:

$ sudo bash minione

At first, there needs to be some checks done. You can see all of them by running with –verbose.

$ sudo bash minione --verbose

### Checks & detection
Checking distribution and version [CentOS 7] OK
Checking cpu virtualization capabilities OK
Check free disk space OK
Using local interface [ens3] OK
Checking directories from previous installation OK
Checking user from previous installation OK
Checking sshd service is running OK
Checking bridge-utils are installed SKIP will try to install
Checking minionebr interface is not present OK
Check given VN 172.16.100.0/24 is not routed OK
Checking SELinux OK
Checking for present ssh key SKIP
Generating ssh keypair in /root/.ssh/id_rsa OK
Checking presence of the market app: "CentOS 7 - KVM" OK

Mainly you need to run it on a supported system — Centos 7 and recently Ubuntus so far. Then, you need CPU capable to perform virtualization, some free space to allocate the images and virtual machines itself, etc.

It may happen that you hit some non critical check to fail

### Checks & detection
Checking directories from previous installation FAILED

But you might try to force it using -f.

$ sudo bash minione -f

### Checks & detection
Checking directories from previous installation IGNORED will be deleted

Once you get through that, you may start the installation.

### Main deployment steps:
Purge previous installation
Configure bridge minionebr with IP 172.16.100.1/24
Enable NAT over ens3
Using ssh public key /root/.ssh/id_rsa.pub
Install OpenNebula version 5.6

Do you agree? [yes/no]:

### Installation
Install bridge-utils OK
Creating bridge interface minionebr OK
Restarting network OK
Enabling ipv4 forward OK
Configuring nat using iptables OK
Saving iptables changes OK
Installing DNSMasq OK
Starting DNSMasq OK
Configuring repositories OK
Installing epel OK
Installing OpenNebula packages OK
Installing ruby gems OK
Installing OpenNebula node packages OK

### Configuration
Switching onegate endpoint in oned.conf OK
Switching scheduler interval to 10sec OK
Setting initial password for current user and oneadmin OK
Starting opennebula services OK
Checking OpenNebula is working OK
Disabling ssh from virtual network OK
Adding localhost ssh key to known_hosts OK
Testing ssh connection to localhost OK
Add ssh key to oneadmin user OK
Updating datastores, TM_MAD=qcow2, SHARED=yes OK
Creating host OK
Creating virtual network OK
Exporting [CentOS 7 – KVM] from marketplace to local datastore OK
Updating template OK

What is happening? Apart from the installation itself, which simply adds the repositories and installs the OpenNebula packages, some configuration changes must be done. Above all, the networking needs be prepared to somehow allow you to connect to the virtual machines later.

For that purpose the bridge interface is created with dedicated network segment and NAT is configured on the installing host. Also, DNS server (DNSMasq) is started for the virtual machines.

miniONE comes with default parameter values for most cases. See them all in the Help:

$ bash minione --help
-h --help                           List of supported arguments
--version [5.6]                     Specify OpenNebula version
-f --force                          Skip non-fatal validation errors
                                    (e.g., traces of existing inst.)
-v --verbose                        Be verbose
--yes                               Don't ask
--password [random generated]       Initial password for oneadmin
--ssh-pubkey [~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub]    User ssh public key
--bridge-interface [minionebr]      Bridge interface for private networking
--nat-interface [first net device]  Interface to configure for NAT
--vnet-address [172.16.100.0]       Virtual Network address
--vnet-netmask [255.255.255.0]      Virtual Network netmask
--vnet-gateway [172.16.100.1]       Virtual Network gateway (i.e. bridge IP)
--vnet-ar-ip-start [172.16.100.1]   Virtual Network AR start IP
--vnet-ar-ip-count [100]            Virtual Network AR size
--marketapp-name [CentOS 7 - KVM]   Name of Marketplace appliance to import
--vm-password [opennebula]          Root password for virtual machine 

Before the installation finishes, it also bootstraps the OpenNebula to be ready to use. At first it enables KVM hypervisor on localhost and downloads one appliance from the market place. So, once that is complete, you may easily login using the printed credentials:

### Report
OpenNebula 5.6 was installed
Sunstone (the webui) is runninng on:
  http://192.168.100.101:9869/
Use following to login:
  user: oneadmin
  password: o6ARsMAdGe

And that’s it! It won’t take us to Mars, but it might be handy, nonetheless.

It’s been a few weeks now since the 2018 OpenNebula Conference in Amsterdam.  It was great to see so many members of the User Community, enthusiastic to learn and share insights around OpenNebula and the current technology landscape.  We give a huge thanks to the great lineup of speakers who presented, as well as to the sponsoring organizations that helped to make the conference a success!

Here are the materials from the conference, available for you to review at your leisure:

Take some time to review the material, think about how it may help with your environment or your proposed solution, and reach back out to the community if you have questions or suggestions. We’d love your feedback!

Additionally, you will have seen our recent 2019 OpenNebula TechDay “Call for Hosts”.
Think about hosting one of your own!

Stay connected!

This upcoming November 5-8, VMworld 2018 will be held in Barcelona. This is a must-attend event where anyone with an interest in virtualization and cloud computing will be in attendance, networking with industry experts. The OpenNebula team will be there in Barcelona, ready to showcase OpenNebula’s integration with VMware Cloud on AWS, as well as, the new features of both OpenNebula 5.6 and vOneCloud 3.2.1.

Join us in Barcelona, make sure to register, and don’t forget to stop by our booth, E422. We can provide a live-demo of how a VMware-based infrastructure can be easily turned into a cloud, with a fully-functional self-service portal – all in the matter of minutes! At the same time, we will be available to answer any questions you may have, and discuss ongoing developments. We hope to see you there!

We’ve seen over the last several years the explosive value brought to the market of cloud computing, and the ever-growing shift toward establishing centralized data centers to support all scales of business processing. The cloud infrastructure of today has provided an extremely effective and economical platform for flexing with the persistent need for increased storage and computing for businesses. With the rapid growth of data, comes the corresponding growth for the need to process that data. Up until now, the modern paradigm has been to have the swift and agile ability to grow one’s data center to handle that growing need for processing power. Virtualized Data Centers and Cloud infrastructures have been foundational tools.

However, with the Internet of Things (IoT) and the forthcoming explosion of “everything connected”, we are seeing that the centralized Cloud infrastructure, on its own, will not be a silver bullet. These mobile devices, which ironically enough, we continue to call “phones”, continue to evolve, providing an ever-growing range of capabilities and a burgeoning power to compute and process. Homes, offices, public buildings, and automobiles are now collecting and generating huge amounts of data, which as we walk by with our phones, or drive by in our automobiles, we’ll have the need and expectation for a much more complete, and almost inherent, interaction. And this is where the current cloud model falls short.

As this explosion of connected data and IoT grows, and interactions between things need to almost mimic human-nature, the basic paradigm shifts from a need to scale, to a need for speed. The importance of latency in these types of “connected” interactions becomes paramount. And here is where we see bringing cloud capabilities closer to the consumer – closer to “the Edge” – as a developing model.

At OpenNebula Systems, we’ve focused, over the last decade, to bring a simple, yet flexible and comprehensive, Virtual Data Center and Cloud Management solution to the market – in OpenNebula. And as the demands have developed, and user needs have changed, we have continued to innovate.  Within the last month, we have released the first version of a prototype solution with cloud disaggregation capabilities. This is the first step in our focus to integrate edge computing, while ultimately maintaining an integrated experience of cloud orchestration and resource management.

With this prototype, we have carried out a simple, but illustrative, use case, demonstrating the value that can be achieved by being able to “disaggregate” one’s cloud infrastructure – (for now, we have introduced support for both Packet and AWS EC2 bare-metal containers) – and bringing it closer to the user.

We assumed that a fictitious company, ACME Corporation, was located in Sacramento, California, where we instantiated an OpenNebula node, to emulate an on-premise private cloud for the company. The case here begins with ACME realizing that it is getting a lot of system traffic, not only within the California region, but also from users in France. And with OpenNebula and the newly introduced Host Provisioning capabilities, ACME Corporation can now:

  • deploy new physical hosts on selected bare-metal cloud providers
  • install and configure them as KVM hypervisors
  • and add them into existing OpenNebula clusters as an independent host.

all within minutes.

In terms of Host Provisioning, for this exercise, we utilized bare-metal containers from Packet.  Here we deployed and configured two separate edge nodes – one in Los Angeles, California, and the other in Marseilles, France.

Edge Node / Location Deployment time Configuration time
Node 1 – Los Angeles, CA 5 minutes 3 minutes
Node 2 – Marseilles, France 5 minutes 7 minutes

Essentially, within a period of 8 minutes and 12 minutes, respectively, we were able to deploy and install two physical hosts on a physical, bare-metal container, and configure each of them as KVM hypervisors.

Then, the next step was to deploy a Virtual Machine.  In this case, we utilized Alpine Linux virtual router appliances with a physical size of 71 MiB. (Deployment time takes into account the total time between the deploy order and the VM entering running state, without taking into account the initial image transfer time, which is required only the first time the VM is deployed on a new location.)

Edge Node / Location Deployment time Image transfer time
Node 1 – Los Angeles, CA 1 seconds 3 seconds
Node 2 – Marseilles, France 9 seconds 15 seconds

So, within a matter of a few minutes, ACME Corporation was able to deploy two separate virtual nodes – all controlled within the single, centrally-managed OpenNebula private cloud. And here is where the “rubber meets the road”. We then measured the latency across the nodes:

We measured latencies for the following situations to demonstrate the centralized cloud use case:

Use Case Infrastructure arrangement Latency
User in Los Angeles, CA Between the user and the on-premise cloud (node in Sacramento, CA) 12 milliseconds
User in Marseille, France Between the user and the on-premise cloud (node in Sacramento, CA) 174 milliseconds

We then measured latencies for the following disaggregated cloud infrastructure:

Use Case Infrastructure arrangement Latency
User in Los Angeles, CA Between the user and the edge (node in Los Angeles, CA) 9 milliseconds
User in Marseille, France Between the user and the edge (node in Marseille, France) 10 milliseconds
User in Paris, France Between the user and the edge (node in Marseille, France) 12 milliseconds

The result it simple. By utilizing OpenNebula’s capability to easily provision a separate, fully functional node on a bare-metal container, such as Packet, that is geographically closer to the end-user, one can achieve a significant improvement in latency. In this case, ACME Corporation was able to reduce the latency for the user in France from 174 milliseconds to 10 milliseconds. And in the world with increased focus on connected data, gaming, and IoT, this will be more and more critical.

While this OpenNebula Host Provisioning prototype is an initial step in our focused development in Edge Computing and Disaggregated Clouds, OpenNebula Systems is also heavily involved in building out similar capability in its collaboration with the telecommunications giant, Telefónica, and their Central Office Re-architected as a Datacenter (CORD) initiative, called “OnLife”.  Read here for additional details about Telefónica’s “OnLife” initiative.

Stay connected with developments at OpenNebula Systems. Don’t forget to join our Newsletter, or reach out to me directly (mabdou@opennebula.systems) for any questions or suggestions. We maintain and nurture a strong Community of Users, and we’d love to hear your feedback and insight.

Recently, we have shared with you our vision with the disaggregated cloud approach in the blog post A Sneak Preview of the Upcoming Features for Cloud Disaggregation.  Today we are very happy to announce the initial release of the Host Provision prototype, which provides the capability to deploy new physical hosts on selected bare-metal cloud providers, to install and configure them as KVM hypervisors, and to add them into existing OpenNebula clusters as an independent host.

Everything included in a single run of the new command “oneprovision”!

For the initial release, we support the Packet Host and Amazon EC2 (i3.metal instance type) bare-metal providers. The tool is distributed as an operating system package for RHEL/CentOS 7, Debian 9, Ubuntu 16.04 and 18.04, or the source code archive. The package should be installed on your OpenNebula front-end and used under the privileges of user oneadmin.

Source code and packages are ready to download from our GitHub repository.

Detailed documentation which covers how to install, use or customize the tooling is available here.

Last, but not least – it’s all open source!

We would love to hear all your comments, suggestions or help with the problems you may experience.  Please use our community forum to get in touch with us.

Hello OpenNebula Community.

I want to take a brief moment to introduce myself, as I have recently joined the OpenNebula project and I will be working very closely with you.  My name is Michael Abdou, and I am the new Community and Customer Success Manager at OpenNebula. I am extremely thrilled and eager to join this Community, and to have the opportunity to help foster a dynamic and collaborative environment, and to be a part of this effort to bring value and innovation to the marketplace.  I have worked most of my career in the United States for a Fortune 100 Insurance company in the IT Delivery space. I initially started out as a BI developer, and later moved into the management track, leading various teams across Development, Analysis, and Quality Assurance. In the last few years, a lot of my focus began to shift from the “conventional, mainstream” technologies and delivery to a more courageous eye on the innovative and emerging technologies – in my case, helping to make the transition to Big Data architecture, as well as developing Platform as a Service (PaaS) solutions.

A main focus of my job here at OpenNebula will be to help foster an environment of pride and passion about our project, to make sure that everyone has a practical and convenient channel to contribute, to promote and cultivate our spirit of collaboration, and to keep our focus on the growth and success of the OpenNebula project always within sight.  I am here to support you, the Community, and to make sure we all have an exceptional user experience. What I ask of you is that you continue to be curious and open-minded. Share your experiences and insights. In the long run, this will only help our Community to grow. If you have any questions, concerns, or suggestions, please always feel free to reach out to me.

I really look forward to working together with you.

Best regards,
Michael


OpenNebula Conf 2018 is getting closer and we would like to announce NTS Netzwerk Telekom Service AG as new Platinum Sponsor.

If you want to participate in OpenNebulaConf and meet NTS and other OpenNebula users and partners, remember that early bird registration with 20% discount is available until September 15th. Also, if your company is interested in sponsoring OpenNebulaConf 2018 there are still slots.

About NTS Captain (Cloud Automation Platform)

In conventional IT departments, workload and complexity are constantly on the increase. However, the respective IT resources are not growing at the same pace. As a result, very often problems such as inefficiency, long waiting times, missing standards and a decentralized management occur. Our new product NTS Captain enables IT departments to present itself as an internal service provider and thus to deal with queries in a fast and efficient way.

With the help of NTS Captain, NTS customers are changing their IT organizations into agile internal infrastructure providers which deliver answers to new challenges such as DevOps. In this way, customer have a much tighter grip on their IT. NTS Captain is based on OpenNebula and can be integrated into the existing VMware environment as a self-service platform without any issues.

About NTS

No matter where you are on your way into the Cloud, NTS as a professional consultant will be able to make the right choice for your Cloud strategies! We gladly support you with our expertise when implementing Cloud strategies and we offer comprehensive advice along the entire value chain. We develop individual Cloud strategies and by using “Cloud methodology” synergies are created that make our customers more powerful; thanks to a versatile IT infrastructure on-premises in the private Cloud or in the public Cloud.

We are organizing a TechDay in Santa Clara, CA, on the 30th of August hosted by Hitachi Vantara.

 

 

 

This event is a great chance to meet and share knowledge among cloud enthusiasts.

As usual we will have an OpenNebula hands-on tutorial in the morning and some talks in the afternoon by cloud experts from Hitachi and OpenNebula Systems.

Due to the limited availability of seats, early registration is strongly recommended to ensure your participation.

See you in Santa Clara!

 

We are organizing a TechDay on the 26th of September in Frabkfurt in collaboration with our friends from LINBIT.

 

 

 

 

 

This event is a great chance to meet and share knowledge among cloud enthusiasts.

As usual we will have an OpenNebula hands-on tutorial in the morning and some talks in the afternoon by cloud experts from LINBIT, Mellanox, Canonical and 24th Technology.

Make sure you register soon as possible because the seats are almost gone!.

See you in Frankfurt!

 

We are glad to announce that our friends from LINBIT will organize the first OpenNebula TechDay in Frankfurt.

As usual in this TechDay you will be able to enjoy a full experience around cloud and open source projects. There will be talks and presentations from experienced people working with LINBIT and OpenNebula.

Yes! A 4 hour long Hands-on tutorial will be conducted by OpenNebula experts so that the attendees are able to see in action and manage their own private  cloud!

 

Check the following links for registration and agenda information: