OpenNebula Technology Days – Wrap Up

The first edition of the OpenNebula Technology Days, kindly hosted by C12G Labs, took place this week in Madrid. It featured an extensive tutorial on how to install, configure and use OpenNebula to build Private, Hybrid and Public clouds. It included a last session covering advanced topics such as how to extend OpenNebula easily due to its flexible architecture, isolating your virtual networks using ebtables, etc.

The event was attended by several partners that actively use OpenNebula as their core toolkit to build clouds. Attendees included people from the following organizations: ATOS, Stuttgart University, IBBT, I2CAT, CNRS, TCD, GRNET, SIXSQ, Telefonica I+D, SURFNET, ESA, Franunhofer FOKUS, NICE, EPCC and IT Innovation. All in all, it turned out to be a successful and very formative event.

More information on the agenda and links to the slides used in the OpenNebula Technology Days can be found here.

Tino Vázquez

OpenNebula Technology Days – Summer 2010

The first edition of the OpenNebula Technology Days will take place in C12G Labs Headquarters in Madrid on the 20th and 21th of July. This first community event includes a tutorial on building clouds with OpenNebula and a technical workshop to present the new features and integration capabilities in the upcoming version. Attendance to the event is by invitation only. A representation of advanced users of the technology, featured projects in the community and C12G partners have been invited, trying to limit the number of participants to 25 in order to ensure an effective event.
Due to the very high demand, new similar events will be organized in the next months. Please send us an email to events@opennebula.org if you want to participate.

OpenNebula in the EU Initiative to Integrate Cloud with Grid

Researchers from a collaboration of six European organisations have attracted funding worth €2.3million to develop a new Internet-based software project called StratusLab. The two year project, headed up by Project Coordinator Dr Charles Loomis from CNRS, was launched in Paris on the 14th of June 2010. It aims to enhance distributed computing infrastructures, such as the European Grid Infrastructure (EGI), that allow research and higher education institutes from around the world to pool computing resources.

Funded through the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7), the two year project aims to successfully integrate ‘cloud computing’ technologies into ‘grid’ infrastructures. Grids link computers and data that are scattered across the globe to work together for common goals, whilst cloud computing makes software platforms or virtual servers available as a service over the Internet, usually on a commercial basis, and provides a way for organisations to access computing capacity without investing directly in new infrastructure. Behind cloud services are data centres that typically house large numbers of processors and vast data storage systems. Linking grid and cloud technologies will result in major benefits for European academic research and is part of the European Commission strategy to develop European computing infrastructures.

StratusLab will integrate, distribute and maintain a sustainable open-source cloud distributionto bring cloud to existing and new grid sites. The StratusLab toolkit will be composed of existing cutting edge open source software, and the innovative service and cloud management technologies developed in the project. The StratusLab toolkit will integrate OpenNebula, the leading open-source toolkit for cloud computing. OpenNebula is a cloud management tool that is widely used in several grid and HPC sites.

Speaking about the project, Project Coordinator Dr Charles Loomis said: “Computer grids are used by thousands of researchers in many scientific fields. For example, the data from the Large Hadron Collider’s experiments, the world’s largest and highest-energy particle accelerator situated at CERN in Switzerland, are distributed via an international grid infrastructure to be processed at institutes around Europe and the world. The StratusLab toolkit will make the grid easier to manage and will allow grids to tap into commercial cloud services to meet peak demands. Later it will allow organisations that already provide a grid service to offer a cloud service to academic users, whilst retaining the many benefits of the grid approach.”

The StratusLab project will bring several benefits to the distributed computing infrastructure ecosystem including simplified management, added flexibility, increased maintainability, quality, energy efficiency and resilience of computing sites. It will benefit a wide variety of users from scientists, who can use the systems to run scientific analyses, to system administrators and hardware technicians, who are responsible for running grid services and maintaining the hardware and infrastructure at various resource centres.

The StratusLab project brings together six organisations, all key players with recognised leadership, proven expertise, experience and skills in grid and cloud computing. This collaboration presents a balanced combination of academic, research and industrial institutes with complementary capabilities. The participating organisations include the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), France; the DSA-Research Group at Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain; the Greek Research and Technology Network S.A., Greece; SixSq Sárl, Switzerland; Telefonica Investigacion y Desarrollo, Spain, and Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.

About the StratusLab Project

The StratusLab project consists of numerous collaborators from six European research institutions. A website can be accessed via the following address: www.stratuslab.eu. The project is partially funded by the European Commission through the Grant Agreement RI-261552.

About OpenNebula

OpenNebula is the most advanced open-source toolkit for building private, public and hybrid clouds, offering unique features for cloud management and providing the integration capabilities that many enterprise IT shops need for internal cloud. OpenNebula is the result of many years of research and development in efficient and scalable management of virtual machines on large-scale distributed infrastructures. The technology has been designed to address the requirements of business use cases from leading companies in the context of flagship international projects in cloud computing. For more info: http://www.OpenNebula.org

About European Union Framework Programme 7

The Seventh Framework Programme (FP7) bundles all research-related EU initiatives together under a common roof playing a crucial role in reaching the goals of growth, competitiveness and employment. The framework programme runs a number of programmes under the headings Cooperation, Ideas, People and Capacities. All specific programmes work together to promote and encourage the creation of European poles of scientific excellence. More information on FP7 can be obtained from http://cordis.europa.eu/fp7/home_en.html.

OpenNebula Documentation in PDF

C12G Labs is happy to announce that the OpenNebula guides are now available in PDF format from the OpenNebula Ecosystem. The following guides are available:

  • Private Cloud Computing with OpenNebula 1.4
  • Public Cloud Computing with OpenNebula 1.4
  • Hybrid Cloud Computing with OpenNebula 1.4
  • OpenNebula 1.4 Reference Guide

OpenNebula users can benefit from these guides, since they can take advantage of having all the information bundled in well organized and easily accessible guides, which are very suitable for offline reference and for printing.

Building Hybrid Clouds with OpenNebula and Deltacloud

OpenNebula has just released a Deltacloud adaptor to build Hybrid Clouds. A Hybrid Cloud is an extension of a Private Cloud to combine local resources with resources from one or several remote Cloud providers. The remote provider could be a commercial Cloud service or a partner private infrastructure running a different OpenNebula instance. Hybrid Cloud computing functionality enables the building of cloudbursting and cloud federation scenarios.

OpenNebula provides support for building Hybrid Clouds with Amazon EC2 and ElasticHost, and now with this new adaptor OpenNebula leverages RedHat Deltacloud to access any major public cloud, such as GoGrid, Rackspace, Terremark or RimuHosting and Private clouds running OpenNebula or RHEV-M.

A single OpenNebula management instance can be used to combine local infrastructure with multiple remote clouds, so building a highly scalable hosting environments. OpenNebula provides support for building any type of Cloud architecture thanks to its support for most popular interfaces (VMware vCloud, Amazon EC2 and OGF OCCI) on more used hypervisor (Xen, KVM, and VMware) and now with on-demand acess to any major public cloud.

Ignacio M. Llorente

OpenNebula Implements vCloud Express API

OpenNebula has contributed to its ecosystem a new Cloud Service to access OpenNebula clouds through the vCloud Express API.  The OpenNebula vCloud Service is a web service that enables you to launch and manage virtual machines in your OpenNebula installation through the vCloud Express API. The vCloud web service is implemented upon the new OpenNebula Cloud API (OCA) layer that exposes the full capabilities of an OpenNebula private cloud; and Sinatra, a widely used light web framework. The vCloud Express API in which this implementation is based, is the one specified by Terremark. This API consists of a subset of standard vCloud API calls that have been customized for a Terremark installation as well as Terremark-specific API calls. The new vCloud service has been tested to work with the vCloud drivers of libcloud and Red Hat deltacloud.

With this new cloud service, OpenNebula implements most common Cloud interfaces: Amazon EC2 Query, OGF OCCI and VMware vCloud. Besides theses interfaces, OpenNebula also brings libvirt and a powerful CLI, and all of them can be used on the same OpenNebula instance, so users can use their favorite interface. Moreover all those interfaces can be used on any of the virtualization technologies supported, Xen, KVM and VMware. These unique features confirm OpenNebula as the leading open-source technology for cloud computing, and demonstrate its adaptability and extensibility capabilities that many enterprise IT shops need for internal cloud adoption.

Ignacio M. Llorente

Building your Open-Source Cloud in Four Steps

C12G has just contributed to the OpenNebula Ecosystem its OpenNebula Express installer under GPL open-source license. This installer eases the installation and deployment of OpenNebula clouds. In few minutes you will get a fully operational cloud from a cluster with a a clean install of the operating system. This is the fastest track to cloud computing, enabling any organization to have an enterprise-grade cloud in four steps.

OpenNebula can be adapted into any existing datacenter to build a private, public or hybrid cloud. Due to this flexibility, OpenNebula can be configured in many different ways, and at times, for new users, it might be challenging to read through the documentation to decide about the structure of their deployment. The aim of this innovative component is to provide a simple installer to deploy OpenNebula quickly and effortlessly.

Please visit the OpenNebula Express page in the OpenNebula Ecosystem for more information.

Ignacio M. Llorente

Deltacloud and Libcloud drivers for OpenNebula

A couple of months ago the OpenNebula open-source project established the OpenNebula Ecosystem in order to promote the different tools, extensions and plug-ins that are available to complement OpenNebula from a wide variety of projects, companies, and research centers. These ecosystem components enhance the functionality provided by the OpenNebula Cloud Toolkit or enable its integration with existing products, services and management tools in the virtualization, cloud and data center ecosystems. Recently two new components have been added to the catalog:

A team led by Sebastien Goasguen in Clemson University has also contributed a tool for transferring files to Unix machines on a cluster, this Python tool is able to transfer a 10GB file to 450 hosts in less than one hour. scp-wave tool is of great help when deploying virtualized services on very large-scale infrastructures.

In few weeks the project will announce new tools in the ecosystem, like the support for new cloud APIs (now OpenNebula already supports OCCI and EC2-Query).

Ignacio M. Llorente

Claudia, an open-source service manager integrated with OpenNebula

As part of its exploitation strategy, Telefónica I+D has decided to release as Open Source a number of components developed during its research on Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) Clouds.  These components will be integrated in the Claudia Platform that will offer a Service Management toolkit to deploy and control the scalability of service among a public or private IaaS Cloud. Telefónica I+D chooses MORFEO Project to release the software because it guarantees the access to the results of research beyond the end of the project.

These components will continue evolving and put into a “production” status by Telefónica I+D. Each component will be released with its own Open Source License (GPL, Apache, MPL, etc.). Telefónica I+D will also provide commercial support following a dual-license schema.

The Claudia Platform is aligned with the Morfeo’s Cloud Technologies Chapter vision of integrating a complete Open Source Stack for managing a IaaS Cloud. In this way, Claudia will be fully integrated with OpenNebula through the OCCI API as both are members of the chapter.

More details: http://claudia.morfeo-project.org/

Ignacio Martin Llorente

Haizea 1.0 now available

The first stable version of the Haizea Lease Manager was released a few days ago and is available for download at http://haizea.cs.uchicago.edu/

Haizea can be used as a drop-in replacement for OpenNebula’s scheduling daemon, providing OpenNebula with more advanced scheduling capabilities such as advance reservations and queueing of requests when there are no resources available.

Haizea 1.0 is compatible with the recently released OpenNebula 1.4 and, compared to the last major release of Haizea (Technology Preview 1.3 in February 2009), introduces many new features focused on:

  • Extensibility: A new modular scheduler design that makes it easier to choose between different scheduling policies, or to write custom policies that can be “plugged into” Haizea. Writing a custom policy only requires writing a Python module implementing a set of methods described in the Haizea documentation.
  • Stability: Many internal changes, including a larger number of unit tests, that make Haizea more stable.
  • Documentation: More documentation, including developer documentation for users interested in extending Haizea or writing custom scheduling algorithms or policies.

For a list of all the new features, take a look at the Haizea Changelog

Work on Haizea 1.2 is already under way, and will include the following features:

  • Support for leases with deadlines. Haizea will include deadline-driven scheduling algorithms such that, if a user specifies a deadline for a lease, Haizea will only accept if it can be scheduled before that deadline. Furthermore, preemptions (if allowed by the lease) will only be done if the deadline restriction is still met.
  • Lease negotiation. The lease lifecycle will be expanded to incorporate a negotiation phase before a lease is accepted. In this negotiation, it will be possible for Haizea to reply to a lease request with multiple possible leases which the user can accept or reject. The initial focus in this work will be on supporting lease pricing.
  • Lease pricing. Haizea will be able to price leases, based on pluggable pricing leases.

Since most of the work for 1.2 is driven by research efforts, the focus for the next couple of months is going to be mostly on the simulation side of Haizea. Nonetheless, improving the integration between Haizea and OpenNebula, particularly in regards to making Haizea more aware of unscheduled changes in the VMs (an issue that several users have brought to our attention), is still part of our long-term goals. However, we don’t anticipate we”ll be able to work on improving that part of Haizea until, at least, the summer. Nonetheless, if there are developers who would be interested in helping to improve the Haizea/OpenNebula integration (specially those who have a stake in this integration), please don’t hesitate to let us know, as we’d be happy to provide assistance.