v.5.8 Release Candidate is available!

OpenNebula v.5.8 “Edge” is just about ready!  The Release Candidate is now available for download, which includes several bug fixes.

A huge thanks goes out to the User Community, as several of the bug fixes were found and brought to our attention by you!

For the latest details about what you can expect from v.5.8 Edge, read about it below:

Relevant Links

ONE Service Appliances in the Marketplace

A short time ago we made a quick introduction to one of our recent efforts in OpenNebula – ONE service appliances. In particular, the CMS platform WordPress. It was just a short announcement in the forum to let you know that we started to expand the OpenNebula’s Marketplace. If you missed this news, you can take a quick look here: Release of WordPress 5.0 appliance

This new endeavor is not just about a preinstalled software package where every new installation/instantiation requires configuration – either by hand or via ansible/saltstack/chef/puppet or another automation tool of your choice. That would be too easy (for us) and not of much use for you. Eventually you may do some reconfiguration anyway to meet your needs, but we tried to make the appliance deployment as automated and straightforward for you as possible. For example, some appliances support username, password and email (where it makes sense) as a contextualization – you can deploy multiple of these appliances at once and each with its own credentials. But we don’t stop there. Even if you decide to not provide any contextualization at all, the appliance will still not have any passwords or sensitive security information baked inside the image. Every time you instantiate a ONE service appliance, it will first configure itself and generate a new set of credentials, tokens and similar, as needed.

For more general information about ONE service appliances, visit the documentation.

The aforementioned announcement serves as a sneak peak and we promised to give you more info about it and more appliances to play with. Let us first take a deeper look at the WordPress appliance. After that we will cover another new appliance – GitLab, the popular CI/CD platform for developers!

WordPress – Let’s write some blog!

We will now create yet another blog. All the necessary steps are in the documentation so you just need to follow the Quick Start first, but don’t leave the contextualization parameters empty. Instead, fill up the bootstrapping variables and save your time by avoiding the need to go through the setup wizard.

Bootstrapped WordPress:

Running WordPress

 

GitLab – It’s time to develop!

GitLab is definitively one of the most popular CI/CD tools these days and we are happy to include it in our marketplace. Again, all the necessary steps are described in the documentation – follow the Quick Start and before you instantiate, fill up the bootstrapping variables. If you fail to do so, GitLab will greet you with the prompt for password setup.

Bootstrapped GitLab:

GitLab login screen

 

This concludes our introduction to the first batch of ONE service appliances. Stay tuned for the next addition!

Do you have a tip for some other great service? Let us know what you think in the comment section!

As part of OpenNebula v.5.8 “Edge”, we have designed a new method for self-provisioning virtual networks. OpenNebula already has two ways for creating virtual networks:

  • Just create it from scratch.
  • Reserve a slice of an existing virtual network.

Typically the virtual networks are created by the cloud administrators and the end user just makes reservations from those virtual networks. However, this method does not allow the end user to make changes at a logic level like changes to IP ranges, the DNS server, etc.

Now, with the new virtual network template, an end user will be able to do just that. The cloud administrator will be able to create a virtual network template with all the required physical attributes, like the driver (VN_MAD), the bridge, the VLAN_ID (it can be set to be automatically generated), etc. and can still use the restricted attributes to manage the end users’ control. Yet in the end, the end user will be able to create a virtual network by means of the template.

For example, the administrator could create a virtual network like this:

cat template.txt
  NAME="vn_template"
  VN_MAD=bridge
  BRIDGE=virbr0
  AUTOMATIC_VLAN_ID=yes
$ onevntemplate create template.txt
  ID: 3
$ onevntemplate show 3
   TEMPLATE 3 INFORMATION
   ID             : 3
   NAME           : vn_template
   USER           : oneadmin
   GROUP          : oneadmin
   LOCK           : None
   REGISTER TIME  : 11/29 14:12:01

   PERMISSIONS                                                 
   OWNER          : um-
   GROUP          : ---
   OTHER          : ---

   TEMPLATE CONTENTS
   AUTOMATIC_VLAN_ID="yes"
   BRIDGE="virbr0"
   VN_MAD="bridge"

And make it available for all end users:

$ onevntemplate chmod 3 604
$ onevntemplate show 3
   …
   PERMISSIONS                                                        
   OWNER          : um-
   GROUP          : ---
   OTHER          : u--
   …

Once the virtual network template is created and ready to use, the end user will be able to create customized virtual networks.

During the instantiation the user can create a new address range:

You can go to the “Virtual Networks” section and check that the virtual network is already there:

 

Test out this new feature – it’s available now in our v.5.8 beta version – and let us know if you have any suggestions!

We are very proud to announce that LINBIT will be our first Platinum Sponsor for the OpenNebulaConf 2019 in Barcelona, on October 21-22, 2019.

Make sure to join us, along with LINBIT, in Barcelona for a great event.  The “Very Early Bird” registration is open. There are great opportunities to participate. Check out http://2019.opennebulaconf.com/ for more details.

If you would like to join LINBIT as a sponsor, please check out the details.

About LINBIT

We keep Linux systems up and running. As the developers of DRBD® software (http://docs.linbit.com/), LINBIT has led the way in high availability since 2001. DRBD has been included in the Linux kernel since version 2.6.33 (2009), has been deployed on all major Linux distributions.

With LINBIT SDS the company creates a high performing Software-Defined Storage (SDS) solution using Linux OS for shared block storage which integrates with the relevant cloud and virtualization systems. LINBIT SDS turns common-off-the-shelf hardware into blazingly fast, reliable block storage. DRBD is integrated into OpenStack, OpenNebula, Docker Kubernetes and Proxmox.

LINSTOR is an Open Source management tool designed to manage block storage devices for large Linux server clusters. Its primary use-case is currently to provide persistent Linux block storage for Kubernetes, OpenStack, OpenNebula and OpenShift environments.

At the OpenNebulaConf 2019 we want show a Linstor demo with OpenNebula including the newest features, for example:

  • Auto-placement policies as LINSTOR objects
  • bcache & deduplication
  • REST-API & GUI

…and many more!

We are proud to sponsor the OpenNebula Conference again, because we believe strongly in open source and its great community.

We are very excited to announce that the eighth edition of our OpenNebula Conference will be held in Barcelona, Spain on October 21-22, 2019.

Plan ahead, and make some space on your calendars, as Barcelona is beautiful in October, and our OpenNebulaConf is an annual event worth attending. This is an entirely educational and networking event, with the focus of sharing keen insight on OpenNebula and the evolving technology landscape, creating conversation around innovations and user experiences, and providing a platform for valuable knowledge sharing! It also includes Hands-on training sessions!

Join us in Barcelona for a great event!  Whether you are exploring the market for a private cloud solution, or you are already an avid user of OpenNebula, this conference offers plenty for you.

And if you’d like the opportunity for your organization to connect with our active User Community – help us sponsor the event!! Check out the details.

We hope to see you in Barcelona!

OpenNebula 5.8 beta (Edge) is the fifth major release of the OpenNebula 5 series. A significant effort has been applied in this release to enhance features introduced in 5.6 Blue Flash, while keeping an eye in implementing those features demanded most by the community. A major highlight of Edge is its focus to support computing on the Edge, bringing the processing power of VMs closer to the consumers to reduce latency. In this regards, Edge comes with the following major features:

  • Support for LXD. This enables low resource container orchestration. LXD containers are ideal to run on low consumption devices closer to the customers.
  • Automatic NIC selection. This enhancement of the OpenNebula scheduler will alleviate the burden of VM/container Template management in edge environments where the remote hosts can be potentially heterogeneous, with different network configurations.
  • Distributed Data Centers. This feature is key for the edge cloud. OpenNebula now offers the ability to use bare metal providers to build remote clusters in a breeze, without needing to change the workload nature. We are confident that this is a killer feature that sets OpenNebula apart from the direct competitors in the space.
  • Scalability improvements. Orchestrating an edge cloud will be demanding in terms of the number of VMs, containers and hypervisors to manage. OpenNebula 5.8 brings to the table a myriad of improvements to the monitoring, pool management and GUI, to deliver a smooth user experience in large scale environments.

This OpenNebula release is named after the edges of nebulas. Nebulas are diffuse objects, and their edges can be considered vacuum. However, they are very thick, so they appear to be dense. This is the aim of OpenNebula 5.8, to provide computing power on a wide geographic surface to offer services closer to customers, building a cloud managed from a single portal over very thin infrastructure. There’s an Edge Nebula on the Freelancer videogame.

The OpenNebula team is now transitioning to “bug-fixing mode”. Note that this is a beta release aimed at testers and developers to try the new features, and send a more than welcomed feedback for the final release. Also note that being a beta, there is no migration path from the previous stable version (5.6.1) nor a migration path to the final stable version (5.8.0). A list of open issues can be found in the GitHub development portal.

Relevant Links

We want to let you know that OpenNebula Systems has just announced the availability of vOneCloud version 3.2.1.

vOneCloud 3.2.1 is based in OpenNebula 5.6.1 and as such it includes all the bug fixes and functionalities introduced in 5.6.1: OpenNebula 5.6.1 Release Notes.

vOneCloud 3.2.1 is a maintenance release with the following minor improvements:

  • Order of elements in list API calls can be selected (ascending or descending).
  • XMLRPC calls can report the client IP and PORT.
  • New quotas for VMS allow you to configure limits for VMs “running”.
  • The Virtual Machines that are associated to a Virtual Router have all actions allowed except nic-attach/dettach.

Also 3.2.1 features the following bugfixes:

  • User quotas error.
  • Migrate vCenter machines provide feedback to oned.
  • Fixed problem migrating vCenter machines to a cluster with a lot of ESX.
  • Improve feedback for ‘mode’ option in Sunstone server.
  • Accounting data does not display.
  • Spurios syntax help on onehost delete.
  • No way for hide Lock/Unlock button for VM in Sunstone view.
  • Update LDAP driver to use new escaping functionality (and issue).
  • Start script base64 enconding fails when using non utf8 characters.
  • Error when creating a vnet from Sunstone using advanced mode.
  • Restricted attributes not enforced on attach disk operation.
  • Improve the dialog when attach nic or instanciated vm in network tab.
  • VNC on ESXi can Break Firewall.
  • Slow monitoring of the live migrating VMs on destination host.
  • onehost sync should ignore vCenter hosts.
  • NIC Model is ignored on VM vCenter Template.
  • Unable to query VMs with non ASCII character.
  • vCenter unimported resources cache not working as expected.
  • Wild importation from vCenter host refactor.
  • Removing CD-ROM from vCenter imported template breaks the template.
  • Error with restricted attributes when instantiating a VM.
  • Onevcenter cli tool few improvements and examples added.
  • OPENNEBULA_MANAGED deleted when updating a VM Template.
  • Unable to update the Running Memory quota.
  • Monitoring VMs fails when there is not datastore associated.

Relevant Links

 

Recently, we have shared with you our vision with the disaggregated cloud approach in the blog post A Sneak Preview of the Upcoming Features for Cloud Disaggregation.  Today we are very happy to announce the initial release of the Host Provision prototype, which provides the capability to deploy new physical hosts on selected bare-metal cloud providers, to install and configure them as KVM hypervisors, and to add them into existing OpenNebula clusters as an independent host.

Everything included in a single run of the new command “oneprovision”!

For the initial release, we support the Packet Host and Amazon EC2 (i3.metal instance type) bare-metal providers. The tool is distributed as an operating system package for RHEL/CentOS 7, Debian 9, Ubuntu 16.04 and 18.04, or the source code archive. The package should be installed on your OpenNebula front-end and used under the privileges of user oneadmin.

Source code and packages are ready to download from our GitHub repository.

Detailed documentation which covers how to install, use or customize the tooling is available here.

Last, but not least – it’s all open source!

We would love to hear all your comments, suggestions or help with the problems you may experience.  Please use our community forum to get in touch with us.

The OpenNebula team is pleased to announce the availability of OpenNebula 5.4.6, a new maintenance release of the 5.4.x series.This version fixes multiple bugs and add some minor features, specially relevant the possibility to setting the CPU model to alleviate the performance penalties of Meltdown OS fixes.

Check the release notes for the complete set of changes.

Relevant Links

A year ago OpenNebula Systems published the VMware Cloud Reference Architecture, a blueprint to guide IT architects, consultants, administrators and field practitioners in the design and deployment of public and private clouds based on OpenNebula on top of VMware vCenter. This reference architecture is intended for organizations with existing VMware environments or expertise who want to limit changes to their underlying VMware infrastructure, but see benefits in a common provisioning layer via OpenNebula to control compute workloads and want to take a step toward liberating their stack from vendor lock-in.

Many things have changed since that document was published. This is a brief summary of what’s new and ready for you:

  • OpenNebula now allows to upload, clone and delete VMDK files.
  • VM importing workflow has been greatly improved through Sunstone, making it easier to import your existing workload into OpenNebula.
  • Resource pools defined in vCenter are supported by OpenNebula so available memory and CPU can be partitioned. When launching a VM from OpenNebula, a resource pool can be selected automatically or the user can choose one.
  • When a VM is instantiated from a VM Template, the datastore associated can be chosen. If DRS is enabled, then vCenter will pick the optimal Datastore to deploy the VM.
  • New disks can be hot-plugged and OpenNebula can be informed from erasing the VM disks if a shutdown or cancel operation is applied to a VM, so users won’t lose data accidentally.
  • Support for vCenter customization specifications, as a complementary alternative to contextualization.
  • Multi vCenter cluster can be now defined in a single VM Template definition.
  • Control how disks are managed in vCenter, through the KEEPS_DISKS_ON_DONE template variable which will help you to protect users data against accidental deletions.
  • Datastores in a Storage DRS can be used as individual datastores by OpenNebula.
  • A bandwidth limit per VM network interface can be applied. VM’s network usage information is now gathered from vCenter.
  • It’s possible to access the OneGate server from vCenter VMs since the onegate token is passed through to the VM.
  • And last but not least, cool features added to Sunstone: a smoother vCenter’s resource import, the Cloud View functionality has been extended, new tags for resources.

This blueprint has been created from the collective information and experiences from hundreds of users and cloud client engagements so your feedback is extremely valuable.

More features are continuously being added, OpenNebula is a project in constant evolution, so stay tuned and do not forget to send us your feedback!