OpenNebula Newsletter – December 2012

Here’s our monthly newsletter with the main news from the last month, including what you can expect in the coming months. We are very proud of our toddler (OpenNebula) arriving at the mature age of five years. Congrats!

Technology

The OpenNebula team is setting the engine to full throttle for the upcoming 4.0 version. There is a set of new cool features that will ensure that the best functionality is present in your favorite cloud management platform. This release is focused on usability, an important effort is being made to ensure that the user experience is as smooth and productive as possible.

On of the mains efforts is focused on giving a facelift to the Sunstone GUI, with a complete revamp of the user dialogs, as well as new options like embedded SSH connections to the virtual machines. Moreover, the command line interface is also undergoing several changes to make them easier to use.

The OpenNebula daemon and the orbiting components are also being scrutinized to produce better logging, so the user and the cloud admin can figure out what is going on in their virtual and physical infrastructure. This will be used as well to offer an audit trail feature.

Another important feature that will be introduced in the upcoming 4.0 release is the ability to create disk snapshots, which comes in very handy for the day to day service management. Other number of improvements are on the oven, like the ability to handle RBD block devices.

It is worth mentioning the new methods to try out OpenNebula, like the Sandboxes with OpenNebula 3.8 preinstalled (for VirtualBox, KVM and VMware  ESX, and an upcoming Amazon EC2 AMI), and the ongoing effort to develop simple how-to guides.

C12G Labs released OpenNebula 3.8 Pro, the enterprise edition of its widely-deployed open-source management solution for enterprise data center virtualization and private cloud computing. OpenNebulaPro integrates the most recent stable version of OpenNebula (3.8) with bugfixes, performance, and scalability patches developed by the community and by C12G for its customers and partners. OpenNebula 3.8 (codename Twin Jet), released one month ago, enhances its AWS and OCCI API implementations and provides a tighter integration with VMware and KVM.

C12G also released the first stable release of the OpenNebulaApps, a suite of tools for users and administrators of OpenNebula to simplify and optimize cloud application management. OpenNebulaApps provides a service management layer on top of OpenNebula by configuring the software stack in the applications, managing multi-tiered applications, providing configurable services from a catalog, and building your own private market to distribute applications across several OpenNebula instances. Cloud applications consist of complex software stacks, OpenNebulaApps helps to manage their life-cycle and contributes to significantly reduce the time needed to build, distribute, and deploy cloud applications.

Community

New contributions form this month from our vibrant community includes a new post explaining how to use OpenNebula and ZFS. Also, folks at SZTAKI have contributed an amazing patch to provide full iSCSI support, we would like to send a big two thumps up to them for this. Same people at SZTAKI have contributed a new appliance to the OpenNebula Marketplace as well as ATA-over-Ethernet drivers. We would like to highlight the talk given by Giovanni Toraldo in the Develer workshop.

We know that there are a high number of infrastructures being cloudify thanks to the use of OpenNebula, but we want to devote some lines to this rural school pilot program for its aim, it closeness and philosophy.

OpenNebula ecosystem keeps growing, we want to give a special mention to Hedera and its great service manager Kanopya. Also, we want to mention the release of new version (0.88) of CLUES,  an energy management system for High Performance Computing (HPC) Clusters and Cloud infrastructures.

It is worth mentioning that, as part of FOSDEM (one of the most important european events in the open source arena), the OSS Cloud IaaS projects (OpenNebula, Eucalyptus, OpenStack, CloudStack) are organizing a Cloud devroom. This Cloud devroom, will be an excellent opportunity to promote your solutions with OpenNebula, share your experiences operating/building/designing a Cloud with OpenNebula at your company or institution,  meet some of the OpenNebula developers, and discuss with others about OSS Cloud technologies.

Outreach

This past month a number of events were participated by OpenNebula members:

During the following months, members of the OpenNebula team will be speaking in the following events:
  • FOSDEM 2013, Brussels, Belgium, February 2 and 3, 2013

If you will be attending any of these events and want to meet with a member of the OpenNebula team, drop us a line at contact@opennebula.org. Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Events page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

OpenNebula Newsletter – November 2012

Here’s our monthly newsletter with the main news from the last month, including what you can expect in the coming months.

Technology

OpenNebula 3.8 Twin Jet has just been released, check out the release notes for release highlights and a summary of the new features incorporated in OpenNebula 3.8.

OpenNebula 3.8 enhances the integration with VMware and KVM, which are the most widely used hypervisors in OpenNebula clouds, and with heterogeneous infrastructures using multiple hypervisors. Twin Jet features an improved storage VMware interface with native support for VMFS and integration with cgroups and SPICE on KVM deployments. This new version seamlessly integrates with the new Virtual Router in the OpenNebula marketplace to provide L3 services based on the OpenNebula virtual networks.

Twin Jet also enhances the EC2 Query API server, which now provides a complete implementation of the Elastic Block Store (EBS) and keypairs, along with other minor enhancements to be more compliant with the Amazon EC2 specification. The OCCI cloud API now brings new actions and hotplugging functionality.

An effort was also carried out to come closer to the popular linux distributions, the new packages for  3.8 distributed by the OpenNebula team for each supported distribution will be the same as the packages contained in the linux distros.

One of the changes introduced in OpenNebula 3.8 is the new contextualization packages The new version comes with some changes that we hope will make people creating images happier.

There is also worth emphasizing the aspects that makes OpenNebula the platform of choice for the enterprise cloud. In a nutshell: it is a production ready software, easily integrated with third party tools and with unique features the management of enterprise clouds.

Community

An interesting study was published by C12G Labs, resulting from a survey among 820 users with a running OpenNebula cloud. The results state that  43% of the deployments are in industry and 17% in research centers, KVM at 42% and VMware at 27% are the dominant hypervisors, and Ubuntu at 31% and CentOS at 26% are the most widely used linux distributions for OpenNebula clouds.

As member of the OpenNebula community, China Mobile has posted their work on how does it take to deploy 100 virtual machines using a single instance of OpenNebula, and the answer is less than 5 minutes! The post is very interesting since it shows the configuration that China Mobile has set in their OpenNebula cloud to achieve this very nice results.

Another awesome contribution to the OpenNebula ecosystem was described by Research in Motion, giving a detailed description of the features and architecture of Carina. The Carina project was motivated by the need to speed up the deployment of services onto the OpenNebula private cloud at RIM,  it is a successful attempt to standardize the process for automating multi-VM deployments and setting auto-scaling and availability management policies in the cloud.

We want to give a big two thumbs up to our community for their amazing contributions to OpenNebula 3.8. We can highlight contributions by China Mobile, Research in Motion, Atos, FermiLab, CentOS and many others. OpenNebula’s Development Portal provides more details about the specific contributions. We would also like to thank all the people that have contributed translations for Self-Service and Sunstone, as well as to Bill Campbell, the author of the nifty integration of OpenNebula and Ceph, with a set of TM/DS/VMM scripts. Moreover, kudos to SZTAKI LPDS for the enhancement in the iSCSI drivers, focused to achieve higher reliability and stability while working with iscsi datastores with TGT server.

Outreach

There’s been a lot of coverage in the media of OpenNebula. We’ve created a page to keep track of the OpenNebula apparitions in the press. This month, OpenNebula was featured in the following publications:

This past month a number of events were participated by OpenNebula members:

During the upcoming month, members of the OpenNebula team will be speaking in the following events:

  • LinuxCon Europe 2012, Barcelona, Spain, November 5-7, 2012
  • BeLUG, Berlin Linux User Group, Berlin, Germany, November 28th, 2012.

If you will be attending any of these events and want to meet with a member of the OpenNebula team, drop us a line at contact@opennebula.org. Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Events page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

The new C12G training program is also relevant for OpenNebula users and administrators, covering OpenNebula public and private training classes. The courses span across 3 days, and cover the fundamentals of the OpenNebula cloud manager platform.

Also this month, C12G Labs disclosed the OpenNebula Jumpstart packages, designed to help new customers springboard their productivity, speed time to deployment, and reduce business and technical risks through professional assistance with initial set-up, configuration, support and knowledge transfer.

OpenNebula Newsletter – October 2012

OpenNebula 3.8 is getting prepared, the team is finishing the testing procedure and the beta release is just a few days away. Here’s our monthly newsletter with the main news from the last month, including what you can expect in the coming months.

Technology

The OpenNebula team is very busy with the next major release, OpenNebula 3.8. We expect to throw a beta release into the wild in a few days, followed by the final release about  halfway through the month.

This release will come with several improvements in the VMware drivers, including the ability to handle VMFS volumes, opening a broad number of possible scenarios storage-wise. Important improvements are also being made in the EC2 interface, with the inclusion of  key-pairs and EBS volume handling; the OCCI interface, with new actions and hotplugging functionality and the KVM hypervisor, with control groups (cgroups) integration. Also, there are new actions for the core lifecycle VM management, with the ability to perform Power on and Power off over VMs. CLI improvements were also develop, as well as SPICE support through Sunstone.

An effort was also carried out to come closer to the popular linux distributions, the new packages for  3.8 distributed by the OpenNebula team for each supported distribution will be the same as the packages contained in the linux distros.

Community

Our user base is growing at a healthy pace. Our more relevant users and contributors have reached us with valuable testimonials, expressing their opinion of OpenNebula and the reasons of their choice over other cloud manager platforms. These testimonials include opinions by industry and research leaders, including China Mobile, Dell, IBM, Logica, FermiLab, CERN, European Space Agency and SARA.

Research in Motion (RIM) have published an open-source component, Carina, that allows to automatically deploy, scale and manage the availability of multi-VM application clusters according to policies such as time of day, load-based, service priority, failure events, or custom metrics.

We want to give a big thumbs up to our community for the translation efforts. Sunstone and Self-service are available in 8 different languages, and more are underway, making a total of 17!.

The demo cloud offered to try out OpenNebula has reached 2,000 users. You may want to register for an account to try out OpenNebula Sunstone, OCCI and EC2.

Outreach

An interesting post have been written in GigaOM about the role OpenNebula plays in cloud computing innovation. Since we started the OpenNebula project in 2005, we have helped many organizations develop value by building innovative cloud services and solutions to meet their user and customer needs in new ways or to meet new market needs.

This past month a number of events were participated by OpenNebula members:

During the upcoming months, members of the OpenNebula team will be speaking in the following event:

Also, Netways will be offering a workshop on OpenNEbula during November:

If you will be attending any of these events and want to meet with a member of the OpenNebula team, drop us a line at contact@opennebula.org. Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Events page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

OpenNebula Newsletter – September 2012

The summer is passing by, and the OpenNebula team is working full speed on the next major release, OpenNebula 3.8. Here’s our monthly newsletter with the main news from the last month, including what you can expect in the coming months.

Technology

The OpenNebula team has been busy with the next major release, OpenNebula 3.8. We expect a Release Candidate to be available in mid-September, followed by the final release towards the end of the month.

This release will focus on improvements on the public cloud interfaces, with new functionality being exposed through OCCI and Amazon EC2, like for instance hotplugging available in the former, and EBS volumes in the latter. VMware support will also get a forward push, with VMFS datastore support, possible even through iSCSI.

Community

During this last month, a new version (v0.5) of rOCCI was released. This Ruby OCCI Server is compatible with an OpenNebula backend, given a version of OpenNebula major or equal to 3.2. Also, a new great and very useful tutorial by cloud.b.lab on Creating a Windows XP VM using OpenNebula 3.6.0 in Ubuntu 12.04 with iSCSI datastore has been released.

We are pleased to see how our list of featured users keeps growing: Payoda, Cerit-CS, BAIDU, RJMetrics, RUR, MIMOS … Welcome on board!

Outreach

This past month a number of events were participated by OpenNebula members:

  • FrOSCon, Bonn, Germany, August 25-26, 2012.
  • CloudOpen 2012, Linux Foundation, San Diego, USA, August 29-31, 2012.

During this month, members of the OpenNebula team will be participating in the following event:

  • BeLUG, Berlin Linux User Group, Berlin, Germany, September 26th, 2012.

If you will be attending any of these events and want to meet with a member of the OpenNebula team, drop us a line at contact@opennebula.org.

Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Events page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

OpenNebula Newsletter – August 2012

Here’s our monthly newsletter with the main news from the last month, including what you can expect in the coming months.

Technology

This month biggest milestone was the release of the latest stable version of OpenNebula 3.6 Lagoon. This release is focused on stabilizing the features introduced in OpenNebula 3.4, improving the performance of some existing features, and adding new features for virtualization management and integration with the new OpenNebula Marketplace. This release was received with substantial coverage by the specialized press, like GigaOM, HPCintheCloud and the Linux Foundation.

Also, the Pro version of OpenNebula 3.6 was released shortly after by C12G Labs, certified by the testing processes which delivered several bugfixes that were patched over the community version. OpenNebulaPro is provided under open-source license to customers and partners on an annual subscription basis through the OpenNebula.pro Support Portal. The subscription model brings several additional benefits in terms of long term multi-year support, integration and production support with professional SLAs, regular maintenance releases, product influence, and privacy and security guarantee, and all at a competitive cost without high upfront fees.

Additionally, a set of packages were developed to aid in the contextualization of guest images by OpenNebula, smoothing the process of preparing images to be used in an OpenNebula cloud. Installing these packages on a guest linux instance (there are packages for the main linux distros) will ensure that the guest are prepared to use the information passed through the OpenNebula contextualization mechanism.

The OpenNebula Marketplace is growing at a good pace, with newly added images like the Virtual Router which can automatically configure a wide variety of networking services. Moreover, a screencast was made available showing how easy is to import an appliance from the Marketplace to your local infrastructure using Sunstone.

And last, but not least, a set of administration scripts for OpenNebula, based on the command line interface, was published to aid cloud admins in common, daily tasks.

Community

A very busy month in the OpenNebula community, with the highlight of China Mobile’s post describing their Big Cloud cloud computing software stack, and how and why they chose OpenNebula as their core component to distributedly manage VMs. We are thrilled about our upcoming collaboration with China Mobile to accommodate their requirements, having them declared their willingness to contribute back in order to improve OpenNebula.

Another good piece of community contribution was performed by Shankhadeep Shome in his blog post about an OpenNebula numa-aware VM balancer using cgroup scheduling. This work comes from his experience implementing a virtual Hadoop cluster using OpenNebula, which is exactly the sort of feedback we love to hear about.

A great contribution was added by AGH University of Science and Technology, with a new set of drivers for OpenVZ, one of the providers of the container-based virtualization for Linux. This broadens the already wide selection of hypervisors supported by OpenNebula ecosystem components.

And we also have a new ecosystem component! The Contrail Virtual Execution Platform. Moreover, cloud.b.labs continues with his series of rather good tutorials, this one explaining how to create windows server 2008 VMs in clustered node machines.

Outreach

This past month a number of events were participated by OpenNebula members:

During this summer, members of the OpenNebula team will be participating in several Cloud events:

  • CloudOpen 2012, Linux Foundation, San Diego, USA, August 29-31, 2012
  • FrOSCon 7, Bonn, Germany, August 25-26, 2012

If you will be attending any of these events and want to meet with a member of the OpenNebula team, drop us a line at contact@opennebula.org.

Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Events page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

OpenNebula Newsletter – July 2012

Here’s our monthly newsletter with the main news from the last month, including what you can expect in the coming months.

Technology

It’s been a very exciting (and busy) month for the OpenNebula team with the release of the OpenNebula 3.6 beta, and several related goodies. OpenNebula 3.6 features a new hotplug mechanism for disk volumes that supports attaching either volatile volumes or existing images to a running VM. We have also re-written the Quota and Accounting tools from scratch. Quota and Accounting are now included in the OpenNebula core, which enhances their integration with the existing authorization and authentication mechanisms and other related tools (e.g. Sunstone).

OpenNebula 3.6 also features improvements in other systems, especially in Sunstone’s interface with the redesign of several tabs. Make sure you check out all the screenshots we published recently on our blog. If you want to try it out, just head over to the OpenNebula Demo Cloud, which we recently updated to OpenNebula 3.6 Beta.

Stay tuned for the stable release of OpenNebula 3.6: it is scheduled for July 9th.

We also announced a first public beta of the new OpenNebula Marketplace, an online catalog where individuals and organizations can quickly distribute and deploy virtual appliances ready-to-run on OpenNebula clouds. Any user of an OpenNebula cloud can find and deploy virtual appliances in a single click. The OpenNebula marketplace is also of interest to software developer looking to quickly distribute a new appliance, making it available to all OpenNebula deployments worldwide.

In this first beta, users could only download existing appliances from the public catalog and access specific information of the appliance configuration. A few days ago, we released a new version that allows users can easily post and share their own appliances. OpenNebula 3.6 is fully integrated with the new OpenNebula Marketplace. Any user of an OpenNebula cloud can very easily find and deploy virtual appliances through familiar tools like the Sunstone GUI or the OpenNebula CLI.

Finally, after releasing a Sandbox Appliance for VMware, we recently did the same with KVM. We also published some interesting articles on OpenNebula for large scale deployments and why OpenNebula is the solution for private cloud computing.

Community

Earlier this month, we heard how FutureGrid, a testbed providing users with grid, cloud, and high performance computing infrastructures, uses OpenNebula for image management in Cloud/HPC environments.

Three current European Union projects, SCI-BUS, SHIWA and EDGI, have organized a Summer School revolving around Cloud and Grid computing. A whole day is devoted to cloud computing where students are trained on how to build and use cloud systems. For this day, the organizers selected OpenNebula because of its widespread use in European projects.

We have a new contribution to the OpenNebula ecosystem: one-ovz-driver, a driver that adds support for OpenVZ as a hypervisor in OpenNebula. Thanks to Dariusz Chrząścik, Marta Ryłko, Radosław Morytko, and Marcin Jarząb at Akademia Górniczo-Hutnicza for this contribution!

Our list of featured users keeps growing, and we recently added several new users, such as Dell, Liberologico, Impetus, OnGrid

Finally, one of the benefits of having a truly international community is that several users have been able to contribute partial and complete translations of OpenNebula’s user-facing interfaces. We recently started using Transifex to help us manage these translations, and we have launched a call for translations. The existing translations can be updated and new translations submitted through our project site at Transifex. The process is very simple: just create a Transifex account (or login with using your Twitter, LinkedIn, Google or Facebook account) and you’ll be able to translate individual strings from English to your native language.

Outreach

This summer, members of the OpenNebula team will be participating in several Cloud events:

If you will be attending any of these events and want to meet with a member of the OpenNebula team, drop us a line at contact@opennebula.org

This last month, we participated in several cloud events, including Clouds for Europe: From Cloud-friendly to Cloud-Active, and Matchmaking in the Cloud. Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Outreach page. We have also have a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

OpenNebula Newsletter – June 2012

Here’s our monthly newsletter with the main news from the last month, including what you can expect in the coming months.

Technology

Shortly after the release of OpenNebula 3.4, C12G Labs announced the release of OpenNebulaPro 3.4. OpenNebulaPro is provided under open-source license to customers and partners on an annual subscription basis through the OpenNebula.pro Support Portal. The subscription model brings several additional benefits in terms of long term multi-year support, integration and production support with professional SLAs, regular maintenance releases, product influence, and privacy and security guarantee, and all at a competitive cost without high upfront fees.

Speaking of OpenNebula 3.4, we also published a screencast showing you how to bootstrap this new version, and how to create a VM from scratch.

We also published a blog post explaining why it makes sense to use OpenNebula on your existing VMWare infrastructure. C12G Labs also released an OpenNebula Sandbox for VMware to quickly deploy an OpenNebula cloud for testing, development or integration. These Cloud Sanboxes will be useful when setting up pilot clouds to quickly test a new feature without having to install and configure an OpenNebula front-end. It is therefore intended for testers, early adopters, developers and also integrators.

Community

We are really excited to announce that Giovanni Toraldo, an active member of the OpenNebula community, has just published a book on OpenNebula. The book has been published by Packt Publishing and it provides a practical step-by-step guide for newcomers. You can purchase the book, in both eBook and print format, on the book’s website.

OpenNebula’s openSUSE maintainer, Robert Schweikert, finished upgrading the packages to the latest OpenNebula 3.4.1 version. He has also contributed some KIWI examples and the openSUSE install guide has been updated to reflect the latest changes.

Outreach

Ignacio M. Llorente, Director of OpenNebula, gave an invited talk at the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Division – NASA Ames on the 24th of May about cloud computing architecture with OpenNebula, with special focus on cloud deployments for High Performance Computing environments. Follow the link for the slides from the presentation, and thanks to everyone at NASA who gave us such great feedback!

OpenNebula also participated the the LinuxTag conference, which took place from the 23rd to the 26th of May in Berlin, Germany. LinuxTag is one of the leading open source conferences in Europe and we had the chance to introduce OpenNebula to the public, explaining most of its features for cloud providers, integrators, and cloud consumers.

While at LinuxTag, we also had a chance to introduce OpenNebula at RootCamp Berlin. RootCamp Berlin is a bar-camp in which several participants meet and agree to hold presentations on several topics of their choice. This was the first edition of the RootCamp, and it ran under the wing of the LinuxTag 2012.

C12G Labs has recently started a series of Webinars focused on different aspects and possible deployments achieved by OpenNebula. Most of these Webinars are by invitation only, but C12G will also offer Webinars open to the general public, the first one will be taking place on June 7th.

Members of the OpenNebula project will be participating in Matchmaking in the Cloud on June 7 and 8, 2012, in Paris.

Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Outreach page. We have also have a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

OpenNebula Newsletter – May 2012

Here’s our monthly newsletter with the main news from the last month, including what you can expect in the coming months.

Technology

The big news this month is the release of the OpenNebula 3.4 (including a maintenance release, OpenNebula 3.4.1). This release is focused on extending the storage capabilities of OpenNebula, including support for multiple datastores. The use of multiple datastores provides extreme flexibility in planning the storage backend and important performance benefits, such as balancing I/O operations between storage servers, defining different SLA and QoS policies for different VM types or users, or easily scaling the cloud storage.

OpenNebula 3.4 also features improvements in other systems, especially in the core with the support of logic resource pools, the EC2 API with the support of elastic IPs, the Sunstone and Self-service portals with new cool features, and the EC2 hybrid cloud driver that now supports EC2 features like tags, security groups or VPCs.

As usual, the OpenNebula community has played an active role in shaping this release, and OpenNebula 3.4 includes contributions from Akamai, Research in Motion, Logica, Terradue 2.0, CloudWeavers, Clemson University, and Vilnius University.

And now that OpenNebula 3.4 is out, we have updated our public cloud to 3.4.

But that’s not all! We will be releasing our first sprint of the 3.6 release cycle soon, including more community contributions, such as the resched command contributed by Research in Motion.

Community

We are happy to announce that the upcoming Ubuntu 12.04 LTS (Precise Pangolin) will feature OpenNebula 3.2.1. We would like to thank Damien Raude-Morvan for maintaining the Debian package and Fabrice Coutadeur for helping us with the sync request, and the friendly people from #ubuntu-devel in Freenode for helping us out every time we asked. Fedora 17 Beta “Beefy Miracle” was also recently released with OpenNebula.

We have a new contribution to the OpenNebula ecosystem: Onenox, an extension of the OpenFlow controller NOX so that it can be called directly by the econe server of OpenNebula. Advanced network services can be enabled by onenox by pushing new rules set onto the Open vSwitch of a cloud infrastructure. Onenox is used to implement the well known Amazon services Elastic IP and security groups.

Rutgers University is building a solar-powered data center that will use an energy-aware version of OpenNebula called GreenNebula.

A team in Engineering (partially funded by Venus-C) have released a tool, ovf4one, which provides an OCCI interface that accepts OVF and provisions resources through the OpenNebula OCA interface.

We recently received new language contributions for OpenNebula Self-Service, our end-user web interface: fr_FR and fr_CA. As happy as we we were to receive these contributions, it was too late to include them in the official OpenNebula 3.4 release.

The cloud-b-lab blog continues to publish some excellent tutorials on OpenNebula, including a recent one on installing OpenNebula 3.4 and VMware ESX 4.1.

Outreach

This month, we gave an intensive tutorial on basic and advance usage and configuration of OpenNebula 3.2.1 at the Open Source Datacenter Conference (OSDC 2012) in Nuremberg, Germany, on the 25th and 26th of April 2012. Make sure to check out our blog post of the event, including slides.

OpenNebula will be holding a presentation on the LinuxTag Conference 2012, which will take place from the 23rd to the 26th of May in Berlin, Germany. The presentation is on Wednesday 23rd, at 11:00 in the London room.

Our Project Director (Ignacio M. Llorente) will participate at OSBC 2012 in San Francisco the 21 and 22 of May and will spend the rest of the week in the Bay Area attending some meetings and giving talks in several locations like NASA Ames. Send us an email to contact@opennebula.org if you are interested in meeting with Ignacio.

Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Outreach page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

OpenNebula Newsletter – April 2012

Here’s our monthly newsletter with the main news from the last month, including what you can expect in the coming months.

Technology

The big news this month is the release of the OpenNebula 3.4 beta. This release is focused on extending the storage capabilities of OpenNebula, including support for multiple datastores. The use of multiple datastores provides extreme flexibility in planning the storage backend and important performance benefits, such as balancing I/O operations between storage servers, defining different SLA and QoS policies for different VM types or users, or easily scaling the cloud storage.

OpenNebula 3.4 also features improvements in other systems, especially in the core with the support of logic resource pools, the EC2 API with the support of elastic IPs, the Sunstone and Self-service portals with new cool features, and the EC2 hybrid cloud driver that now supports EC2 features like tags, security groups or VPCs.

As usual, the OpenNebula community has played an active role in shaping this release, and OpenNebula 3.4 includes contributions from Research in Motion, Logica, Terradue 2.0, CloudWeavers, Clemson University, and Vilnius University.

The final release of OpenNebula 3.4 is scheduled for Wednesday, April 11.

Community

Three new components were contributed to the OpenNebula ecosystem:

  • The Cluster Energy Saving system (CLUES): An energy management system for High Performance Computing (HPC) Clusters and Cloud infrastructures that supports integration with OpenNebula. The main function of the system is to power off internal cluster nodes when they are not being used, and conversely to power them on when they are needed. This component was contributed by the Grupo de Grid y Computación de Altas Prestaciones at the Universidad Politécnica de Valencia.
  • A stable version of the Hyper-V drivers for OpenNebula. This latest release includes new features, such as direct connection to Windows Servers nodes without requiring a proxy machine, improvement of CDROM contextualization mechanism, and support for SCSI hard disks. These new components have been developed with the support of Microsoft.
  • Green Cloud Scheduler: A scheduler that consolidates the virtual machines in the cloud such that as few servers as possible are used to run the current workload while the unused servers are shut down. This component was contributed by the Distributed Systems Research Laboratory of the Technical University of Cluj-Napoca.

Sebastien Goasguen’s team at Clemson University has worked on adding support for EC2-like Elastic IPs and Security Groups to OpenNebula. You can read more about it, including pointers to their code, in this blog post.

Qingye Jiang published a really interesting analysis of several open source cloud communities, including OpenNebula.

Finally, the cloud-b-lab blog has been publishing several tutorials on OpenNebula, including tutorials on VMWare, Windows XP, and Hadoop.

Outreach

We will be giving an intensive tutorial on basic and advance usage and configuration of the new OpenNebula 3.2.1 at the Open Source Datacenter Conference (OSDC 2012) to take place in Nuremberg, Germany, on the 25th and 26th of April 2012. Preregistration for the workshop is needed.

Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Outreach page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.

OpenNebula Newsletter – March 2012

Here’s our monthly newsletter with the main news from the last month, including what you can expect in the coming months.

Technology

Following our rapid release cycle, a pre-release of OpenNebula 3.4 is now available. This pre-release solves minor issues in several OpenNebula components and includes some new features, specially in Sunstone and in the cloud servers (EC2 and OCCI). For a more detailed list of changes, take a look at the release notes. The final release of OpenNebula 3.4 will feature multiple data-stores and several new back-ends for storage. Some of this is already in the repository although it has not been included in this pre-release. We will be releasing OpenNebula 3.4 Beta on the 16th of March… so stay tuned!

We released a new version of the OpenNebula drivers to build clouds on Microsoft Hyper-V. The main aim of this new release is to enhance the performance and scalability of the drivers and to simplify its deployment by leveraging technologies commonly available in Windows environments, like Windows Remote Management. This release also updates the drivers to work with the latest stable version of OpenNebula (3.2). You can find more technical details in the Hyper-V page of the OpenNebula ecosystem. The release of this new driver was announced in CloudScape IV and a final version of this drivers will be released in few weeks.

The OpenNebula driver in Deltacloud has been updated to interact with OpenNebula 3.x clouds. If you want to test it, we added a Howto to our wiki showing how to interact with OpenNebula using Deltacloud, and you can also test it with the OpenNebula Public Cloud.

We added some new documentation resources that may be of use to some of our users:

Community

The big news in the community this month was that OpenNebula will be part of the Helix Nebula partnership, a consortium of leading IT providers and three of Europe’s biggest research centres (CERN, EMBL and ESA) launching a European cloud computing platform to enable innovation for science and to create new commercial markets. In the science research area, OpenNebula is used by the leading supercomputing centers, research labs, and e-infrastructures to build and manage their own cloud computing systems.

During this month we also updated our list of contributors to include people from FermiLab, Harvard, Sandia Labs, CERN, IBM, Logica, Puppet, RIM, and many others (if your name is missing from the list, please contact us). We also added several companies and projects to our list of featured users: CITEC, LibreIT, Tokyo Institute of Technology, CloudWeavers, IBERGRID, MeghaCloud, NineLab, ISMB , RENKEI, BrainPowered… If you would like to be added to the list, please take a moment to fill out our OpenNebula User Survey

We have recently received an important contribution from Research in Motion: they have contributed new image/transfer drivers for qcow2 and multiple datastores, which will be part of the upcoming OpenNebula 3.4.

Fedora 17 Alpha has been released featuring OpenNebula 3.2.1 (thanks to Shawn Starr), and the OpenNebula package in Debian has been updated to 3.2.1 (thanks to Damien Raude-Morvan).

Valentin Bud organized a Cloud Computing and OpenNebula workshop in Timisoara, Romania, on February 16th. Valentin is hoping to organize more workshops like this so, if you live in Romania, make sure you follow his workshop Facebook page.

Finally, we would also like to point out that there was recently a very interesting thread in our user mailing list where the gurus of the of the community exchanged their experiences when using different storage subsystems: GlusterFS, GPFS, Lustre, MooseFS, XtreemFS…

Outreach

CloudScape IV was an opportunity to present how OpenNebula is helping to unleash the innovation of cloud computing and to see the wide adoption of OpenNebula in leading international projects working in cloud computing innovation and interoperability in the area of research infrastructures. Projects like VenusC, BonFIRE, EGI, or StratusLab presented their use of OpenNebula, and how its standard APIs are helping them to offer interoperability and portability to their consumers.

FOSDEM was a great opportunity to get feedback from the community, and to meet with the people behind the projects we collaborate with, Deltacloud, CompatibleOne, Xen Cloud Platform, ….

We will be giving an intensive tutorial on basic and advance usage and configuration of the new OpenNebula 3.2.1 at the Open Source Datacenter Conference (OSDC 2012) to take place in Nuremberg, Germany, on the 25th and 26th of April 2012. Preregistration for the workshop is needed.

Remember that you can see slides and resources from past events in our Outreach page. We have also created a Slideshare account where you can see the slides from some of our recent presentations.