It’s been a few weeks now since the 2018 OpenNebula Conference in Amsterdam.  It was great to see so many members of the User Community, enthusiastic to learn and share insights around OpenNebula and the current technology landscape.  We give a huge thanks to the great lineup of speakers who presented, as well as to the sponsoring organizations that helped to make the conference a success!

Here are the materials from the conference, available for you to review at your leisure:

Take some time to review the material, think about how it may help with your environment or your proposed solution, and reach back out to the community if you have questions or suggestions. We’d love your feedback!

Additionally, you will have seen our recent 2019 OpenNebula TechDay “Call for Hosts”.
Think about hosting one of your own!

Stay connected!

We are opening the Call for Hosts for the OpenNebula TechDays in 2019!

Why don’t you host an OpenNebula TechDay of your own?

The OpenNebula Cloud TechDays are day-long educational and networking events to learn about OpenNebula.  Join our technical experts from OpenNebula Systems for a one-day, hands-on workshop on cloud installation and operation.  You’ll get a comprehensive overview of OpenNebula and will be equipped with the skills and insight to take back to your company and implement right away.

OpenNebula TechDays started in March 2014 and we’ve already celebrated over 30 different TechDays in the Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, United States, Romania, Czech Republic, France, Canada, Malaysia, Bulgaria, Germany and Ireland. They have been hosted by organizations like:

  • BestBuy
  • Telefonica
  • BIT.nl
  • Transunion
  • Hitachi
  • Microsoft
  • BlackBerry
  • Harvard University
  • Netways
  • and many others

Think about hosting a Cloud TechDay – we would love to work with you.  We only require that you provide a room with enough capacity for the attendees and some essential materials (WiFi, projector, etc…).

Go to the  TechDay Guidelines and Registration Form

The deadline for this call is December 11, 2018.  We look forward to hearing from you!

At OpenNebula Systems, we are working on an upcoming feature with the specific aim to simplify the management of VM templates that can be deployed on multiple clusters. When a VM template refers to disk images on datastores shared across different clusters, the VM template can be allocated in any of them. This also requires that the clusters share the network dependencies of the VM template, which may not always be the desired design.

In order to overcome this problem, this feature will implement an automatic selection process for the virtual networks of a VM template. The actual virtual network used by the VM will be selected among those available in the selected cluster using a similar algorithm to the one used to select system datastores or hosts. In this way, the very same VM template will be deployable on multiple clusters without requiring shared networks or any modification.

Quick Video: VM Templates – Automatic Network selection

Anticipated Changes on the CLI and XML-RPC API

The VM template includes a list of network interface controllers (NIC) attached to a virtual network. The definition of the NIC has been extended to include a new selection mode (automatic).

To create a new VM from CLI you can type a command like this:

onevm create --name <name> --cpu <cpu> --memory <memory> --nic auto

This command will create a VM with this NIC:

<NIC>
<NETWORK_MODE><![CDATA[auto]]></NETWORK_MODE>
<NIC_ID><![CDATA[0]]></NIC_ID>
</NIC>

The network selection mode is set by the new attribute NETWORK_MODE, which can be set to either MANUAL (current selection method) or AUTO. The new attribute is optional, and if not changed, it defaults to MANUAL. This way, existing templates do not need to be upgraded as the current interface is preserved.

The API call one.vm.deploy will accept a new template document as an extra parameter. And this new parameter will include the selected networks for those NICs using the automatic selection process.

Version

VM template

one.template.instantiate

one.vm.deploy

Current

NIC = [

 NETWORK = pub

]

NIC = [

AR_ID = 0,

BRIDGE = br0,

CLUSTER_ID = 3,

IP = 10.0.0.4,

NETWORK = pub

NETWORK_ID = 2,

NIC_ID = 3,

SECURITY_GROUPS = 0,

TARGET = one-6-7-0,

VN_MAD = bridge

]

NIC = [

AR_ID = 0,

BRIDGE = br0,

CLUSTER_ID = 3,

IP = 10.0.0.4,

NETWORK = pub

NETWORK_ID = 2,

NIC_ID = 3,

SECURITY_GROUPS = 0,

TARGET = one-6-7-0,

VN_MAD = bridge

]

New Feature

NIC = [

 NETWORK_MODE = auto

]

NIC = [

 NIC_ID = 3,

 NETWORK_MODE = auto

]

Sunstone

From the Template section, we can define the NICs we want set to AUTO and those we do not.

Also, we can change a NIC from the Instantiate section.

You can learn how to derive your own network selection policies in the Scheduler guide.

The plan is for this capability to be included in the upcoming version 5.8, and we will likely backport it to version 5.6.x, as well.  If you have any questions or feedback, send us your input – either on our Developers’ Forum or leave a comment below.

 

OpenNebula allows the management of hybrid environments, offering end-users a self-service portal to consume resources from both VMware-based infrastructures and KVM based ones in a transparent way to the user.

In order to smooth the way of migrating workloads to and from KVM to VMware, OpenNebula is working on an awesome feature for its next release (5.8, and probably backported to 5.6.x).

Here’s a quick review of the complete flow of a translation from vmdk to qcow2:

Export image to OpenNebula Marketplace

Suppose you have an vmdk image and you want to use it in KVM. At this point, we can have different situations.

  • We have the image in vmdk datastore. We would need to upload the image to a marketplace.
  • We want to use an image provided by OpenNebula marketplace. In this case, we have to do nothing.

Import to vmdk

Now we know what image we want to use so, we have to download the image to the datastore where we want to store the image. Once the image is downloaded, we are ready to use it!

Add it to a VM Template

Every image downloaded from a MarketPlace, OpenNebula creates a template in order to use it easily when the destination is vcenter, if not we have to create a template with the image. Now we can update the template with hosts, more images, network etc.

Implementation

From an implementation perspective:

  • Every time we download an image, it is downloaded to the frontend.
  • Then, it is converted to the proper type with the “qemu-img convert” command.
  • Finally, OpenNebula will copy the image to the datastore.

From vmdk to qcow2:  We only take into account that we have to set the bus driver.

From qcow2 to vmdk:  Here the limitation is when we convert an image to vmdk, we lose the contextualization. What we have to do is install VMware tools.

Let’s walk through an example

Imagine that we have a qcow2 image within the OpenNebula MarketPlace and we want to use it in vCenter.

1.)  We select the image:

2.)  Check that the image has qcow2/raw image, then click on the download button.

3.)  Now, we select the vcenter destination datastore.

4.)  As we are going to export the image to a vcenter datastore, we should have a void template in order to attach the new image.

5.)  Now we are ready to instantiate the template and we will see the vm in vcenter.

6.)  And now, we have VNC working.

As I mentioned, the plan is for this capability to be included in the upcoming version 5.8, and we will likely backport it to version 5.6.x, as well.  If you have any questions or feedback, send us your input – either on our Developers’ Forum or leave a comment below.

Our newsletter contains the highlights of the OpenNebula project and its Community throughout the month.

Technology

This month the team released vOneCloud version 3.2.1, which is based on OpenNebula 5.6.1, and as such, it includes all the bug fixes and functionalities introduced in 5.6.1

A few examples include:

  • Order of elements in list API calls can be selected (ascending or descending).
  • XMLRPC calls can report the client IP and PORT.
  • New quotas for VMS allow you to configure limits for VMs “running”.
  • The Virtual Machines that are associated to a Virtual Router have all actions allowed except nic-attach/dettach.

For more details of what is included in vOneCloud 3.2.1, check the Release Notes.

There are several other items “in the oven”, getting ready for release.  Here are a few:

  • We’ve been working on making Virtual Network self-provisioning easier, by allowing end-users to create their own networks from pre-defined network templates.
  • We are making continued progress on the LXD drivers, and getting them in shape for version 5.8.
  • Very soon vCenter users will be able to download any appliance from the Marketplace. OpenNebula datastore drivers will take care of any image conversion required.
  • Lastly, King has “Funded a Feature” through our FaF program – this one allowing Virtual Machines to define automatic network selection for their NICs. The scheduler will pick the best Virtual Network at deployment time. This will simplify the VM Template management, as it will reduce the overall number of templates needed.

Community

Across the OpenNebula User Community, we continue to see interesting and important conversation and discussion.

Leboncoin posted a thorough overview on their own blog of their infrastructure needs – including High Availability and Production stability – along with details on how their choice of using OpenNebula has helped them to successfully build and manage their own IaaS environment.  Take a moment to read the article.

“[The] OpenNebula community is also particularly active and new features are coming out regularly.”

Nodeweaver posted that they have an update being prepared to allow for single-click deployment of their Terraformer VM which integrates Ansible and Terraform to manage OpenNebula resources.  Along with this, in the near future, expect to see the VM available for use in the OpenNebula Marketplace.

LINBIT has been working on a new storage driver that integrates LINSTOR with OpenNebula. Some of the features are:

  • Deploy disk images to storage nodes automatically, or on selected nodes.
  • Attach images to hosts over the network.
  • Easy deployment of highly available images.
  • Allows live migration of VMs, even using the ssh system datastore transfer manager

LINBIT will be leading the effort to create this as an OpenNebula Add-On, so “keep your eyes peeled”.

Though more generic, here’s a quick reference to an interesting article about the ongoing transformation of Data Centers.

And lastly, as we communicated late in September, OpenNebula released an initial prototype, (with source code and packages available at the OpenNebula GitHub), for Host Provisioning.  We continue to develop this set of capabilities. In the meantime, we published a Blog post reviewing a practical exercise we carried out using this Host Provisioning feature to demonstrate its value as the case for Edge Computing continues to grow.

Outreach

October is a long month, and we have been busy, but mostly with our sights set on November! We’ve put in a great amount of planning into this year’s OpenNebula Conference 2018, which is scheduled for November 12-13 in Amsterdam.  We have a great agenda of speakers lined up, with Hands-on tutorials, and plenty of opportunity to network, share, and discuss with experts and practitioners in the cloud community.  We look forward to seeing many of you in Amsterdam. For those who cannot attend, we will be providing updates, presentation documents, and videos from the #OpenNebulaConf.

In addition, OpenNebula will be attending the VMworld Europe Conference in Barcelona from November 5-8.  We’ll be there ready to showcase OpenNebula’s integration with VMware Cloud on AWS, along with the new features of both OpenNebula 5.6 and vOneCloud 3.2.1.  Be sure to swing by booth #E422!

Soon enough, 2019 will be here.  Start thinking about hosting an OpenNebula TechDay!

We’ll see you in November! Stay Connected!

This upcoming November 5-8, VMworld 2018 will be held in Barcelona. This is a must-attend event where anyone with an interest in virtualization and cloud computing will be in attendance, networking with industry experts. The OpenNebula team will be there in Barcelona, ready to showcase OpenNebula’s integration with VMware Cloud on AWS, as well as, the new features of both OpenNebula 5.6 and vOneCloud 3.2.1.

Join us in Barcelona, make sure to register, and don’t forget to stop by our booth, E422. We can provide a live-demo of how a VMware-based infrastructure can be easily turned into a cloud, with a fully-functional self-service portal – all in the matter of minutes! At the same time, we will be available to answer any questions you may have, and discuss ongoing developments. We hope to see you there!

We’ve seen over the last several years the explosive value brought to the market of cloud computing, and the ever-growing shift toward establishing centralized data centers to support all scales of business processing. The cloud infrastructure of today has provided an extremely effective and economical platform for flexing with the persistent need for increased storage and computing for businesses. With the rapid growth of data, comes the corresponding growth for the need to process that data. Up until now, the modern paradigm has been to have the swift and agile ability to grow one’s data center to handle that growing need for processing power. Virtualized Data Centers and Cloud infrastructures have been foundational tools.

However, with the Internet of Things (IoT) and the forthcoming explosion of “everything connected”, we are seeing that the centralized Cloud infrastructure, on its own, will not be a silver bullet. These mobile devices, which ironically enough, we continue to call “phones”, continue to evolve, providing an ever-growing range of capabilities and a burgeoning power to compute and process. Homes, offices, public buildings, and automobiles are now collecting and generating huge amounts of data, which as we walk by with our phones, or drive by in our automobiles, we’ll have the need and expectation for a much more complete, and almost inherent, interaction. And this is where the current cloud model falls short.

As this explosion of connected data and IoT grows, and interactions between things need to almost mimic human-nature, the basic paradigm shifts from a need to scale, to a need for speed. The importance of latency in these types of “connected” interactions becomes paramount. And here is where we see bringing cloud capabilities closer to the consumer – closer to “the Edge” – as a developing model.

At OpenNebula Systems, we’ve focused, over the last decade, to bring a simple, yet flexible and comprehensive, Virtual Data Center and Cloud Management solution to the market – in OpenNebula. And as the demands have developed, and user needs have changed, we have continued to innovate.  Within the last month, we have released the first version of a prototype solution with cloud disaggregation capabilities. This is the first step in our focus to integrate edge computing, while ultimately maintaining an integrated experience of cloud orchestration and resource management.

With this prototype, we have carried out a simple, but illustrative, use case, demonstrating the value that can be achieved by being able to “disaggregate” one’s cloud infrastructure – (for now, we have introduced support for both Packet and AWS EC2 bare-metal containers) – and bringing it closer to the user.

We assumed that a fictitious company, ACME Corporation, was located in Sacramento, California, where we instantiated an OpenNebula node, to emulate an on-premise private cloud for the company. The case here begins with ACME realizing that it is getting a lot of system traffic, not only within the California region, but also from users in France. And with OpenNebula and the newly introduced Host Provisioning capabilities, ACME Corporation can now:

  • deploy new physical hosts on selected bare-metal cloud providers
  • install and configure them as KVM hypervisors
  • and add them into existing OpenNebula clusters as an independent host.

all within minutes.

In terms of Host Provisioning, for this exercise, we utilized bare-metal containers from Packet.  Here we deployed and configured two separate edge nodes – one in Los Angeles, California, and the other in Marseilles, France.

Edge Node / Location Deployment time Configuration time
Node 1 – Los Angeles, CA 5 minutes 3 minutes
Node 2 – Marseilles, France 5 minutes 7 minutes

Essentially, within a period of 8 minutes and 12 minutes, respectively, we were able to deploy and install two physical hosts on a physical, bare-metal container, and configure each of them as KVM hypervisors.

Then, the next step was to deploy a Virtual Machine.  In this case, we utilized Alpine Linux virtual router appliances with a physical size of 71 MiB. (Deployment time takes into account the total time between the deploy order and the VM entering running state, without taking into account the initial image transfer time, which is required only the first time the VM is deployed on a new location.)

Edge Node / Location Deployment time Image transfer time
Node 1 – Los Angeles, CA 1 seconds 3 seconds
Node 2 – Marseilles, France 9 seconds 15 seconds

So, within a matter of a few minutes, ACME Corporation was able to deploy two separate virtual nodes – all controlled within the single, centrally-managed OpenNebula private cloud. And here is where the “rubber meets the road”. We then measured the latency across the nodes:

We measured latencies for the following situations to demonstrate the centralized cloud use case:

Use Case Infrastructure arrangement Latency
User in Los Angeles, CA Between the user and the on-premise cloud (node in Sacramento, CA) 12 milliseconds
User in Marseille, France Between the user and the on-premise cloud (node in Sacramento, CA) 174 milliseconds

We then measured latencies for the following disaggregated cloud infrastructure:

Use Case Infrastructure arrangement Latency
User in Los Angeles, CA Between the user and the edge (node in Los Angeles, CA) 9 milliseconds
User in Marseille, France Between the user and the edge (node in Marseille, France) 10 milliseconds
User in Paris, France Between the user and the edge (node in Marseille, France) 12 milliseconds

The result it simple. By utilizing OpenNebula’s capability to easily provision a separate, fully functional node on a bare-metal container, such as Packet, that is geographically closer to the end-user, one can achieve a significant improvement in latency. In this case, ACME Corporation was able to reduce the latency for the user in France from 174 milliseconds to 10 milliseconds. And in the world with increased focus on connected data, gaming, and IoT, this will be more and more critical.

While this OpenNebula Host Provisioning prototype is an initial step in our focused development in Edge Computing and Disaggregated Clouds, OpenNebula Systems is also heavily involved in building out similar capability in its collaboration with the telecommunications giant, Telefónica, and their Central Office Re-architected as a Datacenter (CORD) initiative, called “OnLife”.  Read here for additional details about Telefónica’s “OnLife” initiative.

Stay connected with developments at OpenNebula Systems. Don’t forget to join our Newsletter, or reach out to me directly (mabdou@opennebula.systems) for any questions or suggestions. We maintain and nurture a strong Community of Users, and we’d love to hear your feedback and insight.

We want to let you know that OpenNebula Systems has just announced the availability of vOneCloud version 3.2.1.

vOneCloud 3.2.1 is based in OpenNebula 5.6.1 and as such it includes all the bug fixes and functionalities introduced in 5.6.1: OpenNebula 5.6.1 Release Notes.

vOneCloud 3.2.1 is a maintenance release with the following minor improvements:

  • Order of elements in list API calls can be selected (ascending or descending).
  • XMLRPC calls can report the client IP and PORT.
  • New quotas for VMS allow you to configure limits for VMs “running”.
  • The Virtual Machines that are associated to a Virtual Router have all actions allowed except nic-attach/dettach.

Also 3.2.1 features the following bugfixes:

  • User quotas error.
  • Migrate vCenter machines provide feedback to oned.
  • Fixed problem migrating vCenter machines to a cluster with a lot of ESX.
  • Improve feedback for ‘mode’ option in Sunstone server.
  • Accounting data does not display.
  • Spurios syntax help on onehost delete.
  • No way for hide Lock/Unlock button for VM in Sunstone view.
  • Update LDAP driver to use new escaping functionality (and issue).
  • Start script base64 enconding fails when using non utf8 characters.
  • Error when creating a vnet from Sunstone using advanced mode.
  • Restricted attributes not enforced on attach disk operation.
  • Improve the dialog when attach nic or instanciated vm in network tab.
  • VNC on ESXi can Break Firewall.
  • Slow monitoring of the live migrating VMs on destination host.
  • onehost sync should ignore vCenter hosts.
  • NIC Model is ignored on VM vCenter Template.
  • Unable to query VMs with non ASCII character.
  • vCenter unimported resources cache not working as expected.
  • Wild importation from vCenter host refactor.
  • Removing CD-ROM from vCenter imported template breaks the template.
  • Error with restricted attributes when instantiating a VM.
  • Onevcenter cli tool few improvements and examples added.
  • OPENNEBULA_MANAGED deleted when updating a VM Template.
  • Unable to update the Running Memory quota.
  • Monitoring VMs fails when there is not datastore associated.

Relevant Links

 

Our monthly newsletter contains the major achievements of the OpenNebula project and its community during the month of September 2018.

Technology

This month the team released OpenNebula 5.6.1 – a new maintenance release of the 5.6 “Blue Flash” series, which addresses several bug fixes, as well as incorporating various feature enhancements.  A few examples include:

  • List subcommands use pagination when in an interactive shell.
  • Order of elements in list API calls can be selected.
  • XMLRPC calls report the client IP and PORT
  • New quotas for VMS allows to configure limits for running VMs “running”.
  • Update Host hook triggers to include all possible states.
  • ‘onezone set’ should allow temporary zone changes.
  • VMs associated to a Virtual Router now feature all lifecycle actions.

OpenNebula 5.6.1 is the first version which includes “Enterprise Add-ons”, which are extended capabilities available for customers of OpenNebula Systems with an active support subscription.

For more details of what is included in OpenNebula 5.6.1, check the Release Notes.

We also closed out the month with the Release of our Host Provisioning Prototype!  This is a project on which we have been working in order to bring additional flexibility and improved efficiency to data center configurations. And it’s just the first step in OpenNebula’s focus to support the deployment of Edge Computing environments.  You can review here the details surrounding this “oneProvision” prototype.

We continue to move ahead with OpenNebula 5.8.  One of the key features that will be included in this upcoming version is OpenNebula’s support for managing LXD containers (Operating System-level Virtualization).  Some of the details and key benefits are outlined in this earlier post.

For vOneCloud, we are currently working on vOne 3.2.1, which will incorporate the same functionalities and advances which we included in our release of OpenNebula 5.6.1.

Lastly, our push for completeness and flexibility continues to grow as we focus on incorporating Python binding, (in addition to Ruby and Java) within OpenNebula.

Community

This section is where we, at OpenNebula, get most excited!  As we all continue to work and focus on bringing real value to the market through the OpenNebula platform, one of the key goals we maintain is to foster genuine interest and engagement amongst our Community.  So much of what are able to achieve depends on you, the OpenNebula users and contributors. So when we see involvement and commitment across the Community, we know that the OpenNebula project is bound for continued growth.

For example, check out this great blog contribution by Inoreader, outlining their step-by-step evolution from a Bare-Metal server architecture to completely virtualizing their infrastructure using OpenNebula and KVM for virtualization, along with StorPool for storage.

Simon Haly, the CEO of LizardFS published a brief about their collaboration with Nodeweaver to create a plugin “scale [your] OpenNebula cloud to Petabytes and beyond.” https://www.prurgent.com/2018-09-18/pressrelease447786.htm

Additionally, in a tweet earlier this month – both simple and direct – LINBIT highlighted the ease with which one can use the OpenNebula image driver,…and then posted a video demo.

The image driver for @opennebula makes #DRBD volumes easily to place VMs on.

Even beyond the direct impacts of our code, many contributors from the OpenNebula Community provided feedback and insight into a recent European Union publication on how to bring Standards and the Open Source community closer together.

And lastly, in the Community space, OpenNebula introduced Michael Abdou, their new Community and Customer Success Manager…read here.

Outreach

In the last week of September, we collaborated with LINBIT as they hosted an OpenNebula TechDay in Frankfurt, Germany!  In addition to offering a FREE Hands-on Tutorial of OpenNebula, we saw presentations and demos carried out by LINBIT, Mellanox, and Hystax.  Here you can check out how things fared at the Frankfurt TechDay.

Keep an eye out for upcoming TechDays, as we try to schedule these sessions periodically throughout the year, in various locations – all free of charge. Or even partner with us to host one of your own!!  OpenNebula TechDay info.

Don’t forget!  The OpenNebula Conference 2018 is right around the corner.  On November 12-13 we will be in Amsterdam, and there will be plenty of which you can take advantage!  From Hands-on Tutorials and Keynotes to Lightning Talks and Community discussions. Take a look at the agenda – plan on joining us in Amsterdam!  http://2018.opennebulaconf.com/

Join our Sponsor Program and be sure to maximize your benefits from the Conference.  The OpenNebula Conference 2018 is currently sponsored by StorPool, LINBIT and NTS as Platinum Sponsors and Virtual Cable SLU and ROOT as Silver Sponsors.  We would love to see you be a part of our team of sponsors!

One more item to put on your calendar is VMworld in Barcelona, on November 5-8, 2018.  We will be there with an exhibit for all things OpenNebula and vOneCloud.  Make sure to swing by booth E422!

More to come in October!!  Stay connected!

The OpenNebula team is pleased to announce the availability of OpenNebula 5.6.1, a new maintenance release of the 5.6 ‘Blue Flash’ series.This version fixes multiple bugs and add some minor features such as:

  • List subcommands use pagination when in an interactive shell.
  • Order of elements in list API calls can be selected.
  • XMLRPC calls report the client IP and PORT
  • New quotas for VMS allows to configure limits for running VMs “running”.
  • Update Host hook triggers to include all possible states.
  • ‘onezone set’ should allow temporary zone changes.
  • VMs associated to a Virtual Router now feature all lifecycle actions.

Check the release notes for the complete set of changes, including bugfixes.

OpenNebula 5.6.1 features the first release of the enterprise addons, available for customers of OpenNebula Systems with an active support subscription.

Relevant Links