Our newsletter contains the highlights of the OpenNebula project and its Community throughout the month.

Technology

We rang in the New year, and then we were right back at it, working on finalising some of the last details for the upcoming release of OpenNebula v.5.8 “Edge”.  From a technology perspective, a great majority of code contributions this month are tied to this release – one that is putting a spotlight on reducing latency and bringing cloud capabilities to the edge.

We released the beta-version of v.5.8.  Hopefully, at least some of you have been able to download it and test it out. You will see:

Keep your eyes peeled for the stable release…it’s coming very soon.

Community

Big thanks to Interactive Network and EuroCloud Germany for hosting what will be our first OpenNebula TechDay of 2019  It is scheduled for February 14, 2019 in Frankfurt, Germany  Remember, these are FREE events – don’t miss the chance to get hands-on training, to learn from others’ insight and experiences, and to network with your peers in the industry.

This month we also posted a Call for Translations for our v.5.8 release, and the User Community has been chipping in to help translate the Sunstone GUI into the 42 languages we have outlined.  But we still need your help! Keep translating! 

Outreach

This is the time of year when our Events calendar for 2019 begins to materialise.  In addition to our first TechDay, you’ll have seen that our OpenNebula Conference 2019 will be held on October 21-22, 2019 in Barcelona, Spain.  Start making plans, and take advantage of “Very Early Bird” prices.

And we thank LINBIT for becoming our First Platinum Sponsor!

We are finalising the remainder of our OpenNebula TechDay schedule.  For now, expect to join us in:

  • Frankfurt
  • Barcelona
  • Vienna
  • Sofia
  • Boston

And as always, don’t forget to join our Developers’ Forum. Here you can learn about the latest talking points, what types of issues people are having, and how to resolve them!

Stay connected!

We are very proud to announce that LINBIT will be our first Platinum Sponsor for the OpenNebulaConf 2019 in Barcelona, on October 21-22, 2019.

Make sure to join us, along with LINBIT, in Barcelona for a great event.  The “Very Early Bird” registration is open. There are great opportunities to participate. Check out http://2019.opennebulaconf.com/ for more details.

If you would like to join LINBIT as a sponsor, please check out the details.

About LINBIT

We keep Linux systems up and running. As the developers of DRBD® software (http://docs.linbit.com/), LINBIT has led the way in high availability since 2001. DRBD has been included in the Linux kernel since version 2.6.33 (2009), has been deployed on all major Linux distributions.

With LINBIT SDS the company creates a high performing Software-Defined Storage (SDS) solution using Linux OS for shared block storage which integrates with the relevant cloud and virtualization systems. LINBIT SDS turns common-off-the-shelf hardware into blazingly fast, reliable block storage. DRBD is integrated into OpenStack, OpenNebula, Docker Kubernetes and Proxmox.

LINSTOR is an Open Source management tool designed to manage block storage devices for large Linux server clusters. Its primary use-case is currently to provide persistent Linux block storage for Kubernetes, OpenStack, OpenNebula and OpenShift environments.

At the OpenNebulaConf 2019 we want show a Linstor demo with OpenNebula including the newest features, for example:

  • Auto-placement policies as LINSTOR objects
  • bcache & deduplication
  • REST-API & GUI

…and many more!

We are proud to sponsor the OpenNebula Conference again, because we believe strongly in open source and its great community.

Version 5.8 will bring cloud capabilities to the Edge

As you will have seen in our recent post, we have released a beta version of the upcoming “v.5.8 Edge”, where in addition to extending and enhancing some of the recent functionalities of “v.5.6 Blue Flash”, we are bringing to the market a collection of new capabilities that are focused on extending cloud computing to the Edge.  The ever-growing discussion around “connected data” and “IoT” is transforming the computing and infrastructure needs of organisations. The conversation is shifting away from centralised cloud infrastructure, and refocusing toward bringing the computing power closer to the users, with a concerted effort to reduce latency. The Clouds are quickly drifting to the Edge.

Historically, with OpenNebula, we have continued to remain at the forefront of cloud computing offerings, with a close eye on the needs of the User Community, while evolving along with the rapidly developing technology.  Now with v.5.8, OpenNebula will be taking a huge step toward moving to the forefront, and bringing remarkable value that will stand out from the rest.

As referenced earlier in our beta-release announcement, v.5.8 Edge will be “something to behold”!  Allow me to remind you why:

  • You will see complete, native support for LXD containers – allowing for the same capabilities as running on VM’s, but without the overhead that comes with running a separate kernel and simulating all the hardware.  You now have more options for your infrastructure.
  • Without having to change the nature of your workload, you will be able to quickly expand your cloud and build remote clusters using bare metal providers.  This feature is key in being able to build Distributed Data Centers along the edge of your expanding cloud.
  • As you build your edge environments, where hosts may be diverse, with different network configurations, the OpenNebula Scheduler will now allow for Automatic NIC selection.
  • v.5.8 Edge will offer broad Scalability Improvements – across pool management, monitoring, and the GUI – to ensure that orchestrating your edge cloud remains simple and effective.

Keep an eye out for updates surrounding the v.5.8 release, as well as, upcoming posts delving into more detail about some of its new capabilities.  And we urge you to get your hands on the beta-version to kick the tires! Let us know what you think!

 

OpenNebula 5.8 beta (Edge) is the fifth major release of the OpenNebula 5 series. A significant effort has been applied in this release to enhance features introduced in 5.6 Blue Flash, while keeping an eye in implementing those features demanded most by the community. A major highlight of Edge is its focus to support computing on the Edge, bringing the processing power of VMs closer to the consumers to reduce latency. In this regards, Edge comes with the following major features:

  • Support for LXD. This enables low resource container orchestration. LXD containers are ideal to run on low consumption devices closer to the customers.
  • Automatic NIC selection. This enhancement of the OpenNebula scheduler will alleviate the burden of VM/container Template management in edge environments where the remote hosts can be potentially heterogeneous, with different network configurations.
  • Distributed Data Centers. This feature is key for the edge cloud. OpenNebula now offers the ability to use bare metal providers to build remote clusters in a breeze, without needing to change the workload nature. We are confident that this is a killer feature that sets OpenNebula apart from the direct competitors in the space.
  • Scalability improvements. Orchestrating an edge cloud will be demanding in terms of the number of VMs, containers and hypervisors to manage. OpenNebula 5.8 brings to the table a myriad of improvements to the monitoring, pool management and GUI, to deliver a smooth user experience in large scale environments.

This OpenNebula release is named after the edges of nebulas. Nebulas are diffuse objects, and their edges can be considered vacuum. However, they are very thick, so they appear to be dense. This is the aim of OpenNebula 5.8, to provide computing power on a wide geographic surface to offer services closer to customers, building a cloud managed from a single portal over very thin infrastructure. There’s an Edge Nebula on the Freelancer videogame.

The OpenNebula team is now transitioning to “bug-fixing mode”. Note that this is a beta release aimed at testers and developers to try the new features, and send a more than welcomed feedback for the final release. Also note that being a beta, there is no migration path from the previous stable version (5.6.1) nor a migration path to the final stable version (5.8.0). A list of open issues can be found in the GitHub development portal.

Relevant Links

It’s been a few weeks now since the 2018 OpenNebula Conference in Amsterdam.  It was great to see so many members of the User Community, enthusiastic to learn and share insights around OpenNebula and the current technology landscape.  We give a huge thanks to the great lineup of speakers who presented, as well as to the sponsoring organizations that helped to make the conference a success!

Here are the materials from the conference, available for you to review at your leisure:

Take some time to review the material, think about how it may help with your environment or your proposed solution, and reach back out to the community if you have questions or suggestions. We’d love your feedback!

Additionally, you will have seen our recent 2019 OpenNebula TechDay “Call for Hosts”.
Think about hosting one of your own!

Stay connected!

We are opening the Call for Hosts for the OpenNebula TechDays in 2019!

Why don’t you host an OpenNebula TechDay of your own?

The OpenNebula Cloud TechDays are day-long educational and networking events to learn about OpenNebula.  Join our technical experts from OpenNebula Systems for a one-day, hands-on workshop on cloud installation and operation.  You’ll get a comprehensive overview of OpenNebula and will be equipped with the skills and insight to take back to your company and implement right away.

OpenNebula TechDays started in March 2014 and we’ve already celebrated over 30 different TechDays in the Netherlands, Belgium, Spain, United States, Romania, Czech Republic, France, Canada, Malaysia, Bulgaria, Germany and Ireland. They have been hosted by organizations like:

  • BestBuy
  • Telefonica
  • BIT.nl
  • Transunion
  • Hitachi
  • Microsoft
  • BlackBerry
  • Harvard University
  • Netways
  • and many others

Think about hosting a Cloud TechDay – we would love to work with you.  We only require that you provide a room with enough capacity for the attendees and some essential materials (WiFi, projector, etc…).

Go to the  TechDay Guidelines and Registration Form

The deadline for this call is December 11, 2018.  We look forward to hearing from you!

At OpenNebula Systems, we are working on an upcoming feature with the specific aim to simplify the management of VM templates that can be deployed on multiple clusters. When a VM template refers to disk images on datastores shared across different clusters, the VM template can be allocated in any of them. This also requires that the clusters share the network dependencies of the VM template, which may not always be the desired design.

In order to overcome this problem, this feature will implement an automatic selection process for the virtual networks of a VM template. The actual virtual network used by the VM will be selected among those available in the selected cluster using a similar algorithm to the one used to select system datastores or hosts. In this way, the very same VM template will be deployable on multiple clusters without requiring shared networks or any modification.

Quick Video: VM Templates – Automatic Network selection

Anticipated Changes on the CLI and XML-RPC API

The VM template includes a list of network interface controllers (NIC) attached to a virtual network. The definition of the NIC has been extended to include a new selection mode (automatic).

To create a new VM from CLI you can type a command like this:

onevm create --name <name> --cpu <cpu> --memory <memory> --nic auto

This command will create a VM with this NIC:

<NIC>
<NETWORK_MODE><![CDATA[auto]]></NETWORK_MODE>
<NIC_ID><![CDATA[0]]></NIC_ID>
</NIC>

The network selection mode is set by the new attribute NETWORK_MODE, which can be set to either MANUAL (current selection method) or AUTO. The new attribute is optional, and if not changed, it defaults to MANUAL. This way, existing templates do not need to be upgraded as the current interface is preserved.

The API call one.vm.deploy will accept a new template document as an extra parameter. And this new parameter will include the selected networks for those NICs using the automatic selection process.

Version

VM template

one.template.instantiate

one.vm.deploy

Current

NIC = [

 NETWORK = pub

]

NIC = [

AR_ID = 0,

BRIDGE = br0,

CLUSTER_ID = 3,

IP = 10.0.0.4,

NETWORK = pub

NETWORK_ID = 2,

NIC_ID = 3,

SECURITY_GROUPS = 0,

TARGET = one-6-7-0,

VN_MAD = bridge

]

NIC = [

AR_ID = 0,

BRIDGE = br0,

CLUSTER_ID = 3,

IP = 10.0.0.4,

NETWORK = pub

NETWORK_ID = 2,

NIC_ID = 3,

SECURITY_GROUPS = 0,

TARGET = one-6-7-0,

VN_MAD = bridge

]

New Feature

NIC = [

 NETWORK_MODE = auto

]

NIC = [

 NIC_ID = 3,

 NETWORK_MODE = auto

]

Sunstone

From the Template section, we can define the NICs we want set to AUTO and those we do not.

Also, we can change a NIC from the Instantiate section.

You can learn how to derive your own network selection policies in the Scheduler guide.

The plan is for this capability to be included in the upcoming version 5.8, and we will likely backport it to version 5.6.x, as well.  If you have any questions or feedback, send us your input – either on our Developers’ Forum or leave a comment below.

 

OpenNebula allows the management of hybrid environments, offering end-users a self-service portal to consume resources from both VMware-based infrastructures and KVM based ones in a transparent way to the user.

In order to smooth the way of migrating workloads to and from KVM to VMware, OpenNebula is working on an awesome feature for its next release (5.8, and probably backported to 5.6.x).

Here’s a quick review of the complete flow of a translation from vmdk to qcow2:

Export image to OpenNebula Marketplace

Suppose you have an vmdk image and you want to use it in KVM. At this point, we can have different situations.

  • We have the image in vmdk datastore. We would need to upload the image to a marketplace.
  • We want to use an image provided by OpenNebula marketplace. In this case, we have to do nothing.

Import to vmdk

Now we know what image we want to use so, we have to download the image to the datastore where we want to store the image. Once the image is downloaded, we are ready to use it!

Add it to a VM Template

Every image downloaded from a MarketPlace, OpenNebula creates a template in order to use it easily when the destination is vcenter, if not we have to create a template with the image. Now we can update the template with hosts, more images, network etc.

Implementation

From an implementation perspective:

  • Every time we download an image, it is downloaded to the frontend.
  • Then, it is converted to the proper type with the “qemu-img convert” command.
  • Finally, OpenNebula will copy the image to the datastore.

From vmdk to qcow2:  We only take into account that we have to set the bus driver.

From qcow2 to vmdk:  Here the limitation is when we convert an image to vmdk, we lose the contextualization. What we have to do is install VMware tools.

Let’s walk through an example

Imagine that we have a qcow2 image within the OpenNebula MarketPlace and we want to use it in vCenter.

1.)  We select the image:

2.)  Check that the image has qcow2/raw image, then click on the download button.

3.)  Now, we select the vcenter destination datastore.

4.)  As we are going to export the image to a vcenter datastore, we should have a void template in order to attach the new image.

5.)  Now we are ready to instantiate the template and we will see the vm in vcenter.

6.)  And now, we have VNC working.

As I mentioned, the plan is for this capability to be included in the upcoming version 5.8, and we will likely backport it to version 5.6.x, as well.  If you have any questions or feedback, send us your input – either on our Developers’ Forum or leave a comment below.

Our newsletter contains the highlights of the OpenNebula project and its Community throughout the month.

Technology

This month the team released vOneCloud version 3.2.1, which is based on OpenNebula 5.6.1, and as such, it includes all the bug fixes and functionalities introduced in 5.6.1

A few examples include:

  • Order of elements in list API calls can be selected (ascending or descending).
  • XMLRPC calls can report the client IP and PORT.
  • New quotas for VMS allow you to configure limits for VMs “running”.
  • The Virtual Machines that are associated to a Virtual Router have all actions allowed except nic-attach/dettach.

For more details of what is included in vOneCloud 3.2.1, check the Release Notes.

There are several other items “in the oven”, getting ready for release.  Here are a few:

  • We’ve been working on making Virtual Network self-provisioning easier, by allowing end-users to create their own networks from pre-defined network templates.
  • We are making continued progress on the LXD drivers, and getting them in shape for version 5.8.
  • Very soon vCenter users will be able to download any appliance from the Marketplace. OpenNebula datastore drivers will take care of any image conversion required.
  • Lastly, King has “Funded a Feature” through our FaF program – this one allowing Virtual Machines to define automatic network selection for their NICs. The scheduler will pick the best Virtual Network at deployment time. This will simplify the VM Template management, as it will reduce the overall number of templates needed.

Community

Across the OpenNebula User Community, we continue to see interesting and important conversation and discussion.

Leboncoin posted a thorough overview on their own blog of their infrastructure needs – including High Availability and Production stability – along with details on how their choice of using OpenNebula has helped them to successfully build and manage their own IaaS environment.  Take a moment to read the article.

“[The] OpenNebula community is also particularly active and new features are coming out regularly.”

Nodeweaver posted that they have an update being prepared to allow for single-click deployment of their Terraformer VM which integrates Ansible and Terraform to manage OpenNebula resources.  Along with this, in the near future, expect to see the VM available for use in the OpenNebula Marketplace.

LINBIT has been working on a new storage driver that integrates LINSTOR with OpenNebula. Some of the features are:

  • Deploy disk images to storage nodes automatically, or on selected nodes.
  • Attach images to hosts over the network.
  • Easy deployment of highly available images.
  • Allows live migration of VMs, even using the ssh system datastore transfer manager

LINBIT will be leading the effort to create this as an OpenNebula Add-On, so “keep your eyes peeled”.

Though more generic, here’s a quick reference to an interesting article about the ongoing transformation of Data Centers.

And lastly, as we communicated late in September, OpenNebula released an initial prototype, (with source code and packages available at the OpenNebula GitHub), for Host Provisioning.  We continue to develop this set of capabilities. In the meantime, we published a Blog post reviewing a practical exercise we carried out using this Host Provisioning feature to demonstrate its value as the case for Edge Computing continues to grow.

Outreach

October is a long month, and we have been busy, but mostly with our sights set on November! We’ve put in a great amount of planning into this year’s OpenNebula Conference 2018, which is scheduled for November 12-13 in Amsterdam.  We have a great agenda of speakers lined up, with Hands-on tutorials, and plenty of opportunity to network, share, and discuss with experts and practitioners in the cloud community.  We look forward to seeing many of you in Amsterdam. For those who cannot attend, we will be providing updates, presentation documents, and videos from the #OpenNebulaConf.

In addition, OpenNebula will be attending the VMworld Europe Conference in Barcelona from November 5-8.  We’ll be there ready to showcase OpenNebula’s integration with VMware Cloud on AWS, along with the new features of both OpenNebula 5.6 and vOneCloud 3.2.1.  Be sure to swing by booth #E422!

Soon enough, 2019 will be here.  Start thinking about hosting an OpenNebula TechDay!

We’ll see you in November! Stay Connected!

This upcoming November 5-8, VMworld 2018 will be held in Barcelona. This is a must-attend event where anyone with an interest in virtualization and cloud computing will be in attendance, networking with industry experts. The OpenNebula team will be there in Barcelona, ready to showcase OpenNebula’s integration with VMware Cloud on AWS, as well as, the new features of both OpenNebula 5.6 and vOneCloud 3.2.1.

Join us in Barcelona, make sure to register, and don’t forget to stop by our booth, E422. We can provide a live-demo of how a VMware-based infrastructure can be easily turned into a cloud, with a fully-functional self-service portal – all in the matter of minutes! At the same time, we will be available to answer any questions you may have, and discuss ongoing developments. We hope to see you there!