v.5.8 Release Candidate is available!

OpenNebula v.5.8 “Edge” is just about ready!  The Release Candidate is now available for download, which includes several bug fixes.

A huge thanks goes out to the User Community, as several of the bug fixes were found and brought to our attention by you!

For the latest details about what you can expect from v.5.8 Edge, read about it below:

Relevant Links

Alongside the OpenNebula 5.8 Beta 2 release, we are also publishing the 5.7.80 beta contextualization packages for the guest operating systems running in the virtual machines. Follow the download pages with the detailed release notes for Linux (and FreeBSD) and Windows. Packages are compatible with OpenNebula versions between 4.6 and 5.8 Beta 2.

You should use these packages if you want to try the very new features of OpenNebula 5.8 Beta. Namely, the LXD hypervisor or multiple managed IP addresses on a single vNIC. Naturally, there are also small fixes and improvements for the users of current stable OpenNebula versions.

With this beta version, we are excited to announce initial support for the FreeBSD guests! It’s now possible to run the FreeBSD virtual machines in the OpenNebula cloud and configure the network, SSH keys, user password, run custom start scripts, or report back via OneGate based on the provided contextualization parameters – most of the things you are used to from the supported Linux distributions. Moreover, we tried to reuse as much as possible from the current Linux contextualization code base. FreeBSD specific contextualization scripts are limited only to the network configuration. The rest of the scripts were adapted to play nicely in both worlds.

For a quick start, we are providing beta KVM images on our Marketplace for FreeBSD 11.2 and FreeBSD 12.0 with preinstalled beta contextualization packages. You can easily import these appliances into your OpenNebula and give it a try.

Please open a GitHub issue to report your bugs or feature requests!

 

ONE Service Appliances in the Marketplace

A short time ago we made a quick introduction to one of our recent efforts in OpenNebula – ONE service appliances. In particular, the CMS platform WordPress. It was just a short announcement in the forum to let you know that we started to expand the OpenNebula’s Marketplace. If you missed this news, you can take a quick look here: Release of WordPress 5.0 appliance

This new endeavor is not just about a preinstalled software package where every new installation/instantiation requires configuration – either by hand or via ansible/saltstack/chef/puppet or another automation tool of your choice. That would be too easy (for us) and not of much use for you. Eventually you may do some reconfiguration anyway to meet your needs, but we tried to make the appliance deployment as automated and straightforward for you as possible. For example, some appliances support username, password and email (where it makes sense) as a contextualization – you can deploy multiple of these appliances at once and each with its own credentials. But we don’t stop there. Even if you decide to not provide any contextualization at all, the appliance will still not have any passwords or sensitive security information baked inside the image. Every time you instantiate a ONE service appliance, it will first configure itself and generate a new set of credentials, tokens and similar, as needed.

For more general information about ONE service appliances, visit the documentation.

The aforementioned announcement serves as a sneak peak and we promised to give you more info about it and more appliances to play with. Let us first take a deeper look at the WordPress appliance. After that we will cover another new appliance – GitLab, the popular CI/CD platform for developers!

WordPress – Let’s write some blog!

We will now create yet another blog. All the necessary steps are in the documentation so you just need to follow the Quick Start first, but don’t leave the contextualization parameters empty. Instead, fill up the bootstrapping variables and save your time by avoiding the need to go through the setup wizard.

Bootstrapped WordPress:

Running WordPress

 

GitLab – It’s time to develop!

GitLab is definitively one of the most popular CI/CD tools these days and we are happy to include it in our marketplace. Again, all the necessary steps are described in the documentation – follow the Quick Start and before you instantiate, fill up the bootstrapping variables. If you fail to do so, GitLab will greet you with the prompt for password setup.

Bootstrapped GitLab:

GitLab login screen

 

This concludes our introduction to the first batch of ONE service appliances. Stay tuned for the next addition!

Do you have a tip for some other great service? Let us know what you think in the comment section!

Our newsletter contains the highlights of the OpenNebula project and its Community throughout the month.

Technology

We rang in the New year, and then we were right back at it, working on finalising some of the last details for the upcoming release of OpenNebula v.5.8 “Edge”.  From a technology perspective, a great majority of code contributions this month are tied to this release – one that is putting a spotlight on reducing latency and bringing cloud capabilities to the edge.

We released the beta-version of v.5.8.  Hopefully, at least some of you have been able to download it and test it out. You will see:

Keep your eyes peeled for the stable release…it’s coming very soon.

Community

Big thanks to Interactive Network and EuroCloud Germany for hosting what will be our first OpenNebula TechDay of 2019  It is scheduled for February 14, 2019 in Frankfurt, Germany  Remember, these are FREE events – don’t miss the chance to get hands-on training, to learn from others’ insight and experiences, and to network with your peers in the industry.

This month we also posted a Call for Translations for our v.5.8 release, and the User Community has been chipping in to help translate the Sunstone GUI into the 42 languages we have outlined.  But we still need your help! Keep translating! 

Outreach

This is the time of year when our Events calendar for 2019 begins to materialise.  In addition to our first TechDay, you’ll have seen that our OpenNebula Conference 2019 will be held on October 21-22, 2019 in Barcelona, Spain.  Start making plans, and take advantage of “Very Early Bird” prices.

And we thank LINBIT for becoming our First Platinum Sponsor!

We are finalising the remainder of our OpenNebula TechDay schedule.  For now, expect to join us in:

  • Frankfurt
  • Barcelona
  • Vienna
  • Sofia
  • Boston

And as always, don’t forget to join our Developers’ Forum. Here you can learn about the latest talking points, what types of issues people are having, and how to resolve them!

Stay connected!

As part of OpenNebula v.5.8 “Edge”, we have designed a new method for self-provisioning virtual networks. OpenNebula already has two ways for creating virtual networks:

  • Just create it from scratch.
  • Reserve a slice of an existing virtual network.

Typically the virtual networks are created by the cloud administrators and the end user just makes reservations from those virtual networks. However, this method does not allow the end user to make changes at a logic level like changes to IP ranges, the DNS server, etc.

Now, with the new virtual network template, an end user will be able to do just that. The cloud administrator will be able to create a virtual network template with all the required physical attributes, like the driver (VN_MAD), the bridge, the VLAN_ID (it can be set to be automatically generated), etc. and can still use the restricted attributes to manage the end users’ control. Yet in the end, the end user will be able to create a virtual network by means of the template.

For example, the administrator could create a virtual network like this:

cat template.txt
  NAME="vn_template"
  VN_MAD=bridge
  BRIDGE=virbr0
  AUTOMATIC_VLAN_ID=yes
$ onevntemplate create template.txt
  ID: 3
$ onevntemplate show 3
   TEMPLATE 3 INFORMATION
   ID             : 3
   NAME           : vn_template
   USER           : oneadmin
   GROUP          : oneadmin
   LOCK           : None
   REGISTER TIME  : 11/29 14:12:01

   PERMISSIONS                                                 
   OWNER          : um-
   GROUP          : ---
   OTHER          : ---

   TEMPLATE CONTENTS
   AUTOMATIC_VLAN_ID="yes"
   BRIDGE="virbr0"
   VN_MAD="bridge"

And make it available for all end users:

$ onevntemplate chmod 3 604
$ onevntemplate show 3
   …
   PERMISSIONS                                                        
   OWNER          : um-
   GROUP          : ---
   OTHER          : u--
   …

Once the virtual network template is created and ready to use, the end user will be able to create customized virtual networks.

During the instantiation the user can create a new address range:

You can go to the “Virtual Networks” section and check that the virtual network is already there:

 

Test out this new feature – it’s available now in our v.5.8 beta version – and let us know if you have any suggestions!

Version 5.8 will bring cloud capabilities to the Edge

As you will have seen in our recent post, we have released a beta version of the upcoming “v.5.8 Edge”, where in addition to extending and enhancing some of the recent functionalities of “v.5.6 Blue Flash”, we are bringing to the market a collection of new capabilities that are focused on extending cloud computing to the Edge.  The ever-growing discussion around “connected data” and “IoT” is transforming the computing and infrastructure needs of organisations. The conversation is shifting away from centralised cloud infrastructure, and refocusing toward bringing the computing power closer to the users, with a concerted effort to reduce latency. The Clouds are quickly drifting to the Edge.

Historically, with OpenNebula, we have continued to remain at the forefront of cloud computing offerings, with a close eye on the needs of the User Community, while evolving along with the rapidly developing technology.  Now with v.5.8, OpenNebula will be taking a huge step toward moving to the forefront, and bringing remarkable value that will stand out from the rest.

As referenced earlier in our beta-release announcement, v.5.8 Edge will be “something to behold”!  Allow me to remind you why:

  • You will see complete, native support for LXD containers – allowing for the same capabilities as running on VM’s, but without the overhead that comes with running a separate kernel and simulating all the hardware.  You now have more options for your infrastructure.
  • Without having to change the nature of your workload, you will be able to quickly expand your cloud and build remote clusters using bare metal providers.  This feature is key in being able to build Distributed Data Centers along the edge of your expanding cloud.
  • As you build your edge environments, where hosts may be diverse, with different network configurations, the OpenNebula Scheduler will now allow for Automatic NIC selection.
  • v.5.8 Edge will offer broad Scalability Improvements – across pool management, monitoring, and the GUI – to ensure that orchestrating your edge cloud remains simple and effective.

Keep an eye out for updates surrounding the v.5.8 release, as well as, upcoming posts delving into more detail about some of its new capabilities.  And we urge you to get your hands on the beta-version to kick the tires! Let us know what you think!

 

OpenNebula 5.8 beta (Edge) is the fifth major release of the OpenNebula 5 series. A significant effort has been applied in this release to enhance features introduced in 5.6 Blue Flash, while keeping an eye in implementing those features demanded most by the community. A major highlight of Edge is its focus to support computing on the Edge, bringing the processing power of VMs closer to the consumers to reduce latency. In this regards, Edge comes with the following major features:

  • Support for LXD. This enables low resource container orchestration. LXD containers are ideal to run on low consumption devices closer to the customers.
  • Automatic NIC selection. This enhancement of the OpenNebula scheduler will alleviate the burden of VM/container Template management in edge environments where the remote hosts can be potentially heterogeneous, with different network configurations.
  • Distributed Data Centers. This feature is key for the edge cloud. OpenNebula now offers the ability to use bare metal providers to build remote clusters in a breeze, without needing to change the workload nature. We are confident that this is a killer feature that sets OpenNebula apart from the direct competitors in the space.
  • Scalability improvements. Orchestrating an edge cloud will be demanding in terms of the number of VMs, containers and hypervisors to manage. OpenNebula 5.8 brings to the table a myriad of improvements to the monitoring, pool management and GUI, to deliver a smooth user experience in large scale environments.

This OpenNebula release is named after the edges of nebulas. Nebulas are diffuse objects, and their edges can be considered vacuum. However, they are very thick, so they appear to be dense. This is the aim of OpenNebula 5.8, to provide computing power on a wide geographic surface to offer services closer to customers, building a cloud managed from a single portal over very thin infrastructure. There’s an Edge Nebula on the Freelancer videogame.

The OpenNebula team is now transitioning to “bug-fixing mode”. Note that this is a beta release aimed at testers and developers to try the new features, and send a more than welcomed feedback for the final release. Also note that being a beta, there is no migration path from the previous stable version (5.6.1) nor a migration path to the final stable version (5.8.0). A list of open issues can be found in the GitHub development portal.

Relevant Links

OpenNebula v.5.8 is close…

We are launching a “Call for Translations” as we prepare the release of OpenNebula v.5.8.  Any help that you can provide in helping to translate for our Sunstone GUI would be of enormous value – and it is very easy to do!

You can translate “one string at a time”.

Existing translations can be updated and new translations submitted through our project site at Transifex:

https://www.transifex.com/opennebula/one/

The “Call for Translations” will end on January 28, 2019.  And translated languages reaching a good level of completion will be included in the official v.5.8 release.

We appreciate your collaboration!!

This post is about a simple tool called miniONE, which allows you to easily install OpenNebula on a single host from the freshly deployed system to the ready-to-use OpenNebula installation just by a single command.

Let’s say that you just want to check out how OpenNebula looks like when starting evaluation or you want to see if something particular is done in v5.6. This might be the case when you can use miniONE.

So, just get it:

$ wget https://github.com/OpenNebula/minione/raw/v5.6.0/minione

and run it:

$ sudo bash minione

At first, there needs to be some checks done. You can see all of them by running with –verbose.

$ sudo bash minione --verbose

### Checks & detection
Checking distribution and version [CentOS 7] OK
Checking cpu virtualization capabilities OK
Check free disk space OK
Using local interface [ens3] OK
Checking directories from previous installation OK
Checking user from previous installation OK
Checking sshd service is running OK
Checking bridge-utils are installed SKIP will try to install
Checking minionebr interface is not present OK
Check given VN 172.16.100.0/24 is not routed OK
Checking SELinux OK
Checking for present ssh key SKIP
Generating ssh keypair in /root/.ssh/id_rsa OK
Checking presence of the market app: "CentOS 7 - KVM" OK

Mainly you need to run it on a supported system — Centos 7 and recently Ubuntus so far. Then, you need CPU capable to perform virtualization, some free space to allocate the images and virtual machines itself, etc.

It may happen that you hit some non critical check to fail

### Checks & detection
Checking directories from previous installation FAILED

But you might try to force it using -f.

$ sudo bash minione -f

### Checks & detection
Checking directories from previous installation IGNORED will be deleted

Once you get through that, you may start the installation.

### Main deployment steps:
Purge previous installation
Configure bridge minionebr with IP 172.16.100.1/24
Enable NAT over ens3
Using ssh public key /root/.ssh/id_rsa.pub
Install OpenNebula version 5.6

Do you agree? [yes/no]:

### Installation
Install bridge-utils OK
Creating bridge interface minionebr OK
Restarting network OK
Enabling ipv4 forward OK
Configuring nat using iptables OK
Saving iptables changes OK
Installing DNSMasq OK
Starting DNSMasq OK
Configuring repositories OK
Installing epel OK
Installing OpenNebula packages OK
Installing ruby gems OK
Installing OpenNebula node packages OK

### Configuration
Switching onegate endpoint in oned.conf OK
Switching scheduler interval to 10sec OK
Setting initial password for current user and oneadmin OK
Starting opennebula services OK
Checking OpenNebula is working OK
Disabling ssh from virtual network OK
Adding localhost ssh key to known_hosts OK
Testing ssh connection to localhost OK
Add ssh key to oneadmin user OK
Updating datastores, TM_MAD=qcow2, SHARED=yes OK
Creating host OK
Creating virtual network OK
Exporting [CentOS 7 – KVM] from marketplace to local datastore OK
Updating template OK

What is happening? Apart from the installation itself, which simply adds the repositories and installs the OpenNebula packages, some configuration changes must be done. Above all, the networking needs be prepared to somehow allow you to connect to the virtual machines later.

For that purpose the bridge interface is created with dedicated network segment and NAT is configured on the installing host. Also, DNS server (DNSMasq) is started for the virtual machines.

miniONE comes with default parameter values for most cases. See them all in the Help:

$ bash minione --help
-h --help                           List of supported arguments
--version [5.6]                     Specify OpenNebula version
-f --force                          Skip non-fatal validation errors
                                    (e.g., traces of existing inst.)
-v --verbose                        Be verbose
--yes                               Don't ask
--password [random generated]       Initial password for oneadmin
--ssh-pubkey [~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub]    User ssh public key
--bridge-interface [minionebr]      Bridge interface for private networking
--nat-interface [first net device]  Interface to configure for NAT
--vnet-address [172.16.100.0]       Virtual Network address
--vnet-netmask [255.255.255.0]      Virtual Network netmask
--vnet-gateway [172.16.100.1]       Virtual Network gateway (i.e. bridge IP)
--vnet-ar-ip-start [172.16.100.1]   Virtual Network AR start IP
--vnet-ar-ip-count [100]            Virtual Network AR size
--marketapp-name [CentOS 7 - KVM]   Name of Marketplace appliance to import
--vm-password [opennebula]          Root password for virtual machine 

Before the installation finishes, it also bootstraps the OpenNebula to be ready to use. At first it enables KVM hypervisor on localhost and downloads one appliance from the market place. So, once that is complete, you may easily login using the printed credentials:

### Report
OpenNebula 5.6 was installed
Sunstone (the webui) is runninng on:
  http://192.168.100.101:9869/
Use following to login:
  user: oneadmin
  password: o6ARsMAdGe

And that’s it! It won’t take us to Mars, but it might be handy, nonetheless.

Just a few minutes of your time…

As we continue to focus on improvements of OpenNebula, we need direction from you, the User Community.

Please take a few minutes to fill out this OpenNebula Survey 2018 – to help us understand how you are using OpenNebula, and what you need going forward.  All information collected is confidential, and will not be shared.

Many, many thanks!