OpenNebula 3.0 Sunstone Screencast

We have started creating a series of screencasts to illustrate the most improtant features of OpenNebula.

This first screencast demonstrates how easy it is to register new Images, create Templates, instantiate Virtual Machines from those Templates and accessing them through the embedded VNC.

In addition we’ll get an overview of Sunstone and it’s major features: the Dashboard, where you’ll see the current status of your cloud, the detailed information panel for each resource and the real-time update of resources and the Dashboard.

Enjoy the screencast!

OpenNebula Cloud Testbed Updated to 3.0

The OpenNebula Cloud offers a virtual computing environment accessible through two different remote cloud interfaces, OCCI and EC2, and through a web interface, OpenNebula Sunstone. These three mechanisms access the same infrastructure, i.e. resources created by any of the mentioned methods will be instantly available on the others. For instance, you can create a VM with the OCCI interface, monitor it with the EC2 interface, and shut it down using the OpenNebula Sunstone web interface.

This Cloud has been migrated to the last OpenNebula version, 3.0. If you have an account you can still use your old username and password. If not, request a new account and check out the new OpenNebula 3.0 features. These interfaces will show you the regular user view of the Cloud, but you will not be able to manage ACLs, hosts, groups nor users, since that will be delegated to the oneadmin group.

OpenNebula 3.0 (Codename Iris) Released!

OpenNebula 3.0 features the latest innovations in cloud computing for the deployment of cutting-edge enterprise-ready on-premise IaaS clouds.

The OpenNebula Project is proud to announce the third major release of its widely deployed OpenNebula Toolkit, a fully open-source enterprise-grade cloud computing tool for the complete and comprehensive management of clouds and virtualized data centers. OpenNebula 3.0 delivers availability, reliability, scalability, security and efficiency with a focus on allowing data centers to provide cloud services by leveraging their existing IT assets, instead of building a new system from the ground up, thus protecting existing investments and avoiding vendor lock-in.

Most of the new innovative features have been developed to fulfill the needs of leading IT organizations running production environments. OpenNebula is helping many organizations make the transition toward the next generation of cloud infrastructures by supporting multiple fully-isolated virtual data centers, advanced multi-tenancy with fine-grained access control, and multiple zones potentially hosted in different geographical locations.

This new release also brings important benefits to cloud users and administrators with a greatly improved SunStone GUI that provides easy access to all the new features in 3.0 and a new oZones GUI to manage zones and virtual data centers. Other features included in this release include new authentication methods with usage quotas, a VM template repository, a new monitoring and accounting service, and a new network subsystem with support for Open vSwitch and 802.1Q tagging.

“This new version has matured thanks to our large user base and the expertise gained since we released the first version of OpenNebula more than three years ago”, said Ignacio M. Llorente, Director of the OpenNebula Project. “We really appreciate the valuable support, software contributions, and feedback from our active and engaged community”.

With more than 5,000 downloads per month, OpenNebula is being used by thousands of organizations to build large-scale production clouds.

“The third major release of OpenNebula brings the latest innovations in cloud computing. There is no cloud manager offering similar levels of flexibility, performance, control, and availability”, said Ruben S. Montero, Chief Architect of the OpenNebula open-source project.

Relevant Links

OpenNebula Adds Hyper-V Support

We are really excited to announce that we are working with Microsoft on cloud computing innovation utilizing the Windows Server Hyper-V hypervisor. Microsoft is providing support and technical guidance to OpenNebula open-source project to add and maintain Hyper-V on the list of officially supported hypervisors. Hyper-V adoption is rising fast and its support to build OpenNebula clouds is highly demanded by our community. The results of this collaboration will be incorporated into the OpenNebula distribution and so available freely to the public.

We started the work in July and are planning to have a first prototype of the integration in mid October. The new components will be released under the Apache license as a new OpenNebula ecosystem project. In order to provide the greater flexibility, the integration will support both variants of Hyper-V, namely in Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1. Disk images will be managed using a shared storage server (e.g. SAN) and standard POSIX calls from the OpenNebula server. OpenNebula will additionally leverage the networking management functionality provided by Hyper-V. The integration will not require the installation of new services in the nodes, making quite simple and rapid to build an OpenNebula cloud on existing Hyper-V deployments.

This collaboration consolidates OpenNebula’s position as a fully open-source interoperable and innovative solution for the management of virtualized data centers to enable private, public and hybrid clouds. OpenNebula interoperability makes cloud an evolution by offering common cloud standards and interfaces, leveraging existing IT infrastructure, protecting existing investments, and avoiding vendor lock-in. OpenNebula is used by many research projects as a powerful tool for innovation and interoperability, and by thousands of organizations to build large-scale production clouds using KVM, Xen and VMware. Microsoft’s Windows Server with Hyper-V platform is growing in the enterprise space and this collaboration with Microsoft will extend the list of supported hypervisors to include Hyper-V to give customers a great choice of enterprise ready virtualization platforms.

This is excellent news for the community!. You can visit the Openness@Microsoft blog for additional information. Stay tuned, the first release will be available in few weeks.

OpenNebula 3.0 Release Candidate 1

23rd September 2011. The OpenNebula project announces the availability of OpenNebula 3.0 RC1(2.9.90), the first release candidate of OpenNebula 3 toolkit. This release is consider feature complete and will be further stabilized with fixes for important and critical bugs, the team continues in its bug fixing mode.

As noted early, this release cycle is being a bit larger than previous ones, the source tree is almost in release shape. There are some gaps in the documentation that will be filled by the final release. You should expect a final release at the end of the month. Please note that OpenNebula 3.0 RC is not suitable for production environments. We recommend those currently running 3.0 Beta1 or 3.0 Beta2 to upgrade.

The OpenNebula team wants also to thank all the feedback received for the previous beta releases. Keep testing!

What’s new in OpenNebula 3.0

OpenNebula 3.0 comes with a lot of new features: ACLs , Zones, Virtual Data Centers, new network models among others. Please take a look to OpenNebula 3.0 release notes for more information.

What’s new in OpenNebula 3.0 RC1

This RC release includes many bug fixes, and stabilizes the OpenNebula 3.0 code base. It also include some new features:
  • New authentication methods for Sunstone. Sunstone can be used now with x509 certificates.
  • New authentication methods EC2 and OCCI. The EC2 and OCCI interfaces can be used with x509 certificates now.
  • Access Control for VM deployment. Users can not bypass the scheduler by default (i.e. onevm deploy is not available to all users), it can be configured through an ACL, though.
  • OpenNebula Zones and Virtual Data Centers. A couple of new feautes have been added to easily manage the physical hosts assigned to a VDC. Now you can add/delete hosts, and force sharing of physical hosts among VDCs.This functionality is available through the CLI, but it will be exposed in the Ozones GUI for 3.0 Final.

Migrating from OpenNebula 3.0 Beta

As for OpenNebula 3.0 the internal database uses versioning. Upgrading from OpenNebula 3.0 Beta1 needs to follow the standard upgrade procedure described in the documentation.

Migrating from OpenNebula 2.x

There has been a bump in the major version number of OpenNebula. There are three main areas that need attention when upgrading your installation (if you are an OpenNebula 2.x user):
  • Database, The DB schema has re-design from scratch, to ease the transition you should use the ”onedb” tool to automatically upgrade your system.
  • User Interface, There are minor changes in the CLI and user interface. The most notably ones are that now you can reuse names, and that images and networks can not be referenced by name, use NETWORK_ID and IMAGE_ID instead.
  • API, New methods have been included for the new features. Also there are a few changes in the current xml-rpc methods.
For a complete set of changes to migrate from a 2.x installation please refer to the new Compatibility Guide. You should also read this document if you are an OpenNebula 2.x user.

OpenNebula 3.0 Beta2 Released!

8th September 2011. The OpenNebula project announces the availability of OpenNebula 3.0Beta2 (2.9.85), the second preview of the upcoming OpenNebula 3 toolkit. OpenNebula 3 introduces many new components and features for cloud management. With this release, the code base of OpenNebula 3 is feature freeze and the team will concentrate its efforts on polishing and bug fixing.

The release cycle of OpenNebula 3.0 is being a bit larger than previous ones as expected. However the source tree is stabilizing fast, you should expect a final release at the end of the month. Please note that OpenNebula 3.0 Beta 2 is not suitable for production environments. We recommend those currently running 3.0 Beta, released last July, to upgrade.

The OpenNebula team wants also to thank all the feedback received for the previous beta release. Keep testing!

What’s new in OpenNebula 3.0

OpenNebula 3.0 comes with a lot of new features: ACLs , Zones, Virtual Data Centers, new network models among others. Please take a look to OpenNebula 3.0 release notes for more information.

What’s new in OpenNebula 3.0 Beta 2

This beta release includes many bug fixes, and stabilizes the OpenNebula 3.0 code base. It also include some new features:
  • New authentication methods. Those deployments that require a robust and secure authentication system can use x509 certificates and SSH keys.
  • Quota support. The quota service has been moved to the new ACL system and extended to include storage space.
  • Sunstone. The OpenNebula management console has been extended to level its functionality with that of the CLI.

Migrating from OpenNebula 3.0 Beta

As for OpenNebula 3.0 the internal database uses versioning. Upgrading from OpenNebula 3.0 Beta1 needs to follow the standard upgrade procedure described in the documentation.

Migrating from OpenNebula 2.x

There has been a bump in the major version number of OpenNebula. There are three main areas that need attention when upgrading your installation (if you are an OpenNebula 2.x user):
  • Database, The DB schema has re-design from scratch, to ease the transition you should use the ”onedb” tool to automatically upgrade your system.
  • User Interface, There are minor changes in the CLI and user interface. The most notably ones are that now you can reuse names, and that images and networks can not be referenced by name, use NETWORK_ID and IMAGE_ID instead.
  • API, New methods have been included for the new features. Also there are a few changes in the current xml-rpc methods.
For a complete set of changes to migrate from a 2.x installation please refer to the new Compatibility Guide. You should also read this document if you are an OpenNebula 2.x user.

OpenNebula 3.0 Beta 1 Out for Testing!

OpenNebula, the open-source cloud project  managed by C12G Labs, is pleased to announce the availability of the first beta release of OpenNebula 3.0. This beta release is targeted at testers and users that would like to check the exciting new features that have been developed to meet the needs of our most demanding users. The third major release of OpenNebula brings the following unique key features in cloud computing management:

  • Multi-tenancy. New advanced group and user account management tools to create isolated compartments within the same cloud and a new powerful Access Control List authorization system to implement multiple sharing scenarios with role management and fine grain permission control.
  • Networking. A new easily adaptable and customizable networking system that supports Open vSwitch and VLAN tagging (IEEE 802.1Q) and enables the configuration of firewalls for VMs.
  • VM Management. A new component for the management of VM Templates that can now be stored, shared and instantiated multiple times without the need for storing the VM template files.
  • Accounting and Monitoring. A new component to generate accounting reports and to simplify the integration with billing tools.
  • VM Image Management. The VM Image Repository is now handled with its own manager component and a scriptable set of drivers to easily tune its operations.
  • SunStone Web Portal. An enhanced SunStone portal that now provides usage graphics and statistics with cloudwatch-like functionality, VNC support, and different system views for different roles. Moreover a new plugin support to easily extend SunStone with additional tabs to better integrate Cloud and VM management with each site’s own operations and tools.
  • Massively Scalable Multi-tier Architectures. The new OpenNebula Zones component (oZones) allows for the centralized management of multiple instances of OpenNebula (zones) that could be hosted in different geographical locations. Several of our users are running tens of thousands of VMs per zone.
  • Virtual Datacenters. Each OpenNebula Zone can be effectively shared through the Virtual Data Center (VDC) abstraction. A VDC is a set of virtual resources (images, VM templates, virtual networks and virtual machines) and users that use and control those virtual resources.

OpenNebula 3.0 uses a new database schema with a new tool to upgrade from previous OpenNebula versions. The new internal database schema greatly improves the flexibility of the code with no performance cost. There are lots of other minor features, like improvements in the libvirt driver to include additional parameters, or the ability to edit resource templates (hosts, images or VM templates). The final version of OpenNebula 3.0 will also bring new external authentication drivers (SSH, LDAP, and X509), an accounting CLI, and quota management.

We have incorporated these features based upon the great feedback we received from our ever-growing community. With this new release, OpenNebula continues to fulfill the promise of building a state-of-the-art open source toolkit that also addresses the scalability, flexibility and security requirements of large-scale production deployments. The OpenNebula project would like to thank the community for their effort and valuable contributions that made possible this release. OpenNebula is fully open-source technology  released under the Apache 2.0 license.

Relevant Links

OpenNebula Joins the Open Virtualization Alliance

C12G Labs has just announced that it has joined the Open Virtualization Alliance (OVA), a consortium committed to fostering the adoption of open virtualization technologies including Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM). The OpenNebula project is excited to join an interoperable ecosystem of components around KVM. These are also great news for the OpenNebula community where KVM is already a popular virtualization platform.

The mission of the Open Virtualization Alliance is to foster the adoption of KVM as an open virtualization alternative, accelerate the emergence of an ecosystem of third-party solutions around KVM, increase overall awareness and understanding of KVM, encourage interoperability, promote best practices and highlight examples of customer successes. The Open Virtualization Alliance today announced broad industry support and adoption with the addition of 65 new members to the consortium. Governing members of the Open Virtualization Alliance include  HP, IBM, Intel, and Red Hat.

An Overview of the New Features of OpenNebula 3.0

A couple of months have passed since the release of OpenNebula 2.2 (Cat’s Eye) and we have been quite active since then. The next release of OpenNebula is getting in shape fast and a significant amount of new features are already in the repository.

Let’s start reviewing the not-so-glamorous new features. One of the main themes for the next release is database refactoring. The new DB backend of OpenNebula features a schema free (document-oriented) implementation of the data model on top of a SQL DB. This will give us enough flexibility to easily extend the attributes and resources managed by OpenNebula at no performance cost. Also, the next release includes DB versioning and a tool to upgrade from previous versions of OpenNebula.

Another important area of work has been networking. We have evolved the network manager component to provide out-of-the-box integration with typical VLAN technologies. In particular, you’ll be able to choose from 802.1Q VLAN tagging, Open vSwitch and simple isolation based on ebtables filters. You’ll also be able to set up simple firewalling rules for each VM specifying black/white TCP/UDP port settings.

The next release will also feature important improvements in VM management. Virtual Machine templates can now be stored in OpenNebula so you can easily instantiate pre-defined configurations, and share them with other users. This new VM Template pool along with the existing Network and Image will give users and administrators a very flexible and simple way to define and instantiate virtual infrastructures.

We have also re-factored the Image Repository to adopt a pluggable architecture that can integrate any storage backend, with a filesystem-based repository provided in the next release. The Image Repository can be now further integrated with external catalogs. The next release will also showcase a preview of this hybrid cloud storage, that integrates Amazon S3 and OpenNebula, to download, contextualize and integrate S3 images in your local Image Repository.

Sunstone has also received some attention from the team, being extended to accommodate all the new features and some rough edges have been polished. We have also added support for plug-ins, enabling the easy customization of the control panel.  There is also a couple of new specific features for the interface: VNC access to VM instances through the web browser using noVNC; and graphical information about the health of your cloud.

And last but not least, the multi-tenancy support for OpenNebula has been considerably improved with the addition of groups and access control lists (ACLs). This will provide great flexibility to share resources among users and to define user roles. Grounded in this new functionality, you’ll be also able to experiment with the new Virtual Data Center (VDC) manager. Using a muti-tier architecture you’ll be able to aggregate multiple OpenNebula’s (zones) and define within them multiple, isolated VDCs.

Finally as you my have noticed from the title, there are so many new features (as well as changes in the database and internal API’s) that we have decided to upgrade the major versioning number of OpenNebula to 3. The changes in the public APIs are minimal and we expect that current applications will run without modifications on top of OpenNebula 3.0.

OpenNebula 3.0 also includes contributions from several members of our community, such as CERN, FermiLab, and Harvard University’s SEAS.

A beta version of OpenNebula 3.0 (codename Iris) will be ready for testing by the end of June and its stable release is scheduled on July 20th. As usual, OpenNebula releases are named after a Nebula. The Iris Nebula (NGC 7023, Caldwell 4) is a reflection nebula in the constellation of Cepheus.

We will appreciate your feedback on these new features. Thanks!

C12G/OpenNebula to Contribute to the European Cloud Strategy

C12G/OpenNebula will participate in the panel about Cloud Computing Fostering Innovation of the workshop Towards a Cloud Computing Strategy for Europe: Matching Supply and Demand organized by the European Commission to help identify the main elements of a European Cloud Strategy. This panel will discuss the opportunities presented by the cloud, interoperability and standards issues, and the potential for innovation. Other panelists are senior-management representatives of European companies, organizations and networks, and the European Parliament. The workshop is part of the 1st Digital Agenda Assembly.